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2011-08-02TOWN OF DRYDE SPECIAL TOWN BOARD AWXTING August 2, 201 I Present. Supervisor Mary Ann Sumner, Cl Stcphtm Stelick, Cl Joseph Solomon, Cl Jason Leifer, Cl David Makar ghi Qted Officials; Sambi L. Avery, Town Clerk Jack Bush, Highwsy Superintendent Other Town Staff: Mahlon R. Perkins, Town Attorney Data Kwasnowski, Director of Planning Supv Sumner opened the board meeting at 7.05 p_rn, and board mcembers and guests participated in the pledge of allence, Supv Sumner thanked everyone for coming and expressing an interest in this issue. She said they have elected to dispense with citizens privilege tonight. The have accepted email comments up until about 0 minutes ago, Partly in recognition of the nearly 300 email comments received in the last six weeks, they are dispersing with citizens privilege tonight. This is a town board working meeting a?rd they will not be taking any comments, She said she would appreciate it if the public would refrain from expressions of pleasure or displeasure if possible, The Clarity Connect co =location hearing was rescheduled for August 3 1 at 7:00 p.m, At Perkins said the applicant should comply with the procedure requirements in the local law and submit a ruest in writing for the fee waiver request. That hearing will be on the .1st also. Supv Sumner asked khe board to consider the resolution clarifying the town's prohibition of natural gas exploration and extraction, Cl Leifer moved the resolution; it wa.s seconded by Cl Solomon, Atty Perkins said this resolution is essentially what +%^as distributed L n June_ There are some changes and a track changes version has been emailed to the board, Some changes simply involved reorganizing the "whereas' paragraphs so that like concepts and topics were grouped together. There is new leu -iguage regarding the headwaters of O asco and Cayuga. Lakes, the Susquehanna River, Sic Mile Creek Arid Fall Creek and the fact that they are all public drinking water sources, There is new language that talks about the Town's tormvA�ater Management, Erosion and Sediment Control Law and the local law to prohibit illicit discharges in connections to the MS4, There are other editorial changes and additions. There is mother new paragraph regarding critical environmental areas. There are changes in the paragraph regarding scientific paprsrz, reports and articles which are now in appendix 1. There are several new paragraphs. The paragraph regarding public comments is new and the comments are attached in appendix _ There are .no changes to the proposed text of the arnendrnernt, but some editorial changes were made to the Findings and Determination. In paragraph S of the Findiri.ga, the words 'surface water" were added, S) R review is necessary prior to adoption of the amendment. PqG I of M °0 s N 01 *8 5 -2 -11 ® Supv Sumner thanked Cl Stelick, Cl Leifer and Atty Perkins for coming in to help with this today. Supv Sumner said Tompkins County Planning review noted no impacts, and noted this is a clarification of existing zoning. Cl Leifer said this is a clarification of the existing law in the town. Prior to this the prohibition was based on the "catch all provision" that if it is not: specifically permitted, it is prohibited. This will remove any doubt that the activities associated with exploration and extraction are prohibited under our zoning. Supv Sumner said it is not permitted in any part. of the Town under current zoning. The pages of the resolution give the reasons why, and aside from the enormous amount of research they have been reviewing, the reasons existed years ago. Cl Leifer said the reasons are in the Comprehensive Plan. Supv Sumner said they are in the 1968 General Plan as well. Supv Sumner noted there are references in the Comprehensive Plan to protection of water. Cl Leifer said that based on what we know about the gas industry and what is predominately proposed by the industry for the Southern Tier, it is heavy industry, not the old style of wells. They are talking about high volume, slickwater hydrofracking. Supv Sumner said the sDGEIS now proposes that applicants be able to attest that their application complies with local regulations. That has not been true of gas well applications in the past, and that reaffirms that they will now be required to notify local municipalities and that was not the case in the past. Local authority will be respected. Cl Leifer said when we are referencing the water resources it is based on the studies we have for the aquifers that we know of and the map that was prepared on how the streams in the town feed into the larger bodies of water. Aquifer protection has been talked about for a long time and we should be receiving information about the boundaries of the aquifer shortly. The Conservation Board's recommendation for CFA's does not include the recharge areas, but that can be amended. The board reviewed the full environmental assessment form. Part 1 is not applicable because it is not a change. Supv Sumner and Cl Makar read aloud the detail in Part 1(D) Informational Details. Supv Sumner stated that part 2 of the SEAR contained all "no" answers. RESOLUTION # 125 (2011) - NEG SEQR DEC - ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT Cl Makar offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: WHEREAS, A. The proposed action involves consideration of the adoption of an amendment to • the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance, Page 2 of 16 TB 8-2-11 B. The proposed action is an Unlisted Action for which the Town Board of the Town ® of Dryden is the lead agency for the purposes of uncoordinated environmental review in connection with approval by the Town. C. The Town Board of the Town of Dryden, in performing the lead agency function for its independent and uncoordinated environmental review in accordance with Article 8 of the New York State Environmental Conservation Law - the State Environmental Quality Review Act "(SEQR), (i) thoroughly reviewed the Long Environmental Assessment Form (the "Long EAF "), Part I, and any and all other documents prepared and submitted with respect to this proposed action and its environmental review, (ii) thoroughly analyzed the potential relevant areas of environmental concern to determine if the proposed action may have a significant adverse impact on the environment, including the criteria identified in 6 NYCRR §617.7(c), and (iii) completed the Long EAF, Part Il; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS: 1. The Town Board of the Town of Dryden, based upon (i) its thorough review of the Long EAF, Part I, and any and all other documents prepared and submitted %vith respect to this proposed action and its environmental review, (ii) its thorough review of the potential relevant areas of environmental concern to determine if the proposed action may have a significant adverse impact on the environment, including the criteria identified in 6 NYCRR §617.7(c), and (iii) its completion of the Long EAF, Part II, including the findings noted thereon (which findings are incorporated herein as if set forth at length), hereby makes a negative determination of environmental significance ( "Negative Declaration") in accordance with SEQR for the above referenced proposed action, and determines that neither a full Environmental Assessment Form, nor an Environmental Impact Statement will be required, and 2. The Responsible Officer of the Town Board of the Town of Dryden is hereby authorized and directed to complete and sign as required the determination of significance, confirming the foregoing Negative Declaration, which fully completed and signed Long EAF and determination of significance shall be incorporated by reference in this Resolution. 2nd Cl Solomon Roll Call Vote Cl Stelick Yes CI Solomon Yes Supv Sumner Yes Cl Makar Yes Cl Leifer Yes Supv Sumner said she received an email from Cl Solomon after leaving for the meeting on the 20th stating that he supported the ban (he was unable to attend that meeting). Cl Leifer said the board is doing this to reaffirm the Comprehensive Plan of 2006 and 1968. The town has not ever contemplated heavy industry and the extraction and exploration of gas is unquestionably a heavy industry, with the amount of truck traffic, heavy equipment, the emissions from that equipment, the compressors, the amount of activity by people on the sites. It is something that had been considered in the prior adoption of the zoning. I think that a lot of the comments that have come in also go towards continuing the prohibition of heavy industry in the town and the zoning rewrite that's going on now, because that is also put together in support of the 2005 Comprehensive Plan. In the rewrite we are making use decisions and not regulating an industry, per se. These are land use decisions that have been considered over time, and in fact about two years ago when the issue started popping up to the town board. Since that time more and more information has come forth to the board members at different intervals, both from groups that support drilling and against. We 've had Page 3 of 16 TR 8 -2-I 1 opportunities through TCCOG to discuss different issues relative to the industry such as road use, water protection and the social impacts the industry has had in Bradford County, PA. The Town Attorney attended several gas drilling CLE meetings. Meetings have been held at the Association of Towns conferences. For the last three years they've been discussing the issue at various levels of intensity. And many attorneys have looked at it from all sides of the issue through the development of road protection ordinances and Delta has finally delivered a draft road protection ordinance and the board will be looking at that in the corning weeks. Other towns have been choosing to address the issue in different ways, such as Virgil. One of the motivations behind their aquifer protection law is the prospect of gas drilling. We've been talking about this for a long time. We've been considering the potential impacts this industry would have on the town for a long time. He said in his mind he has determined that it is not compatible with existing land uses nor with the contemplated land uses that appear in the comprehensive plan. Until we have a new comprehensive plan, he doesn't think that permitting the activity through our zoning code should be considered. The comments that have come in indicate that: the public favors continuing this prohibition as well. He was elected to represent the public in town, and by voting for this that's what he feels he is doing. Supv Sumner said the comments have been pretty overwhelming and she thanked board members for the amount of time spent reviewing them. Some were very thoughtful and informative. She agrees that she represents the entire town. Sometimes they are not able to do things that the majority wishes for, and this time they are. This isn't the end of it. They %won't stop working on it. There are more steps and studies they need to do and review. Cl Solomon read the email that he sent to Supv he is wholeheartedly behind what we are doing tonight. heritage. He is thinking about the next seven generatie next seven generations. Every decision made will have keep everything the way it is clean air, clean water and viable for our children's children. Sumer for the July 20 hearing. He said The reason is that this is part of his ns and what they would like for those an impact and his decision is to try and everything that can be sustained and Cl Stelick asked Cl Leifer if there was any advantage or disadvantage to passing this clarification of existing law tonight. Cl Leifer said it is clear that the clarification needs to made and carried into the new zoning. The zoning rewrite is partially in response to the 2005 Comprehensive flan. In a couple years well be working on a new Comprehensive Plan. These comments go toward future events as well. There is no disadvantage to this at all. It will make it abundantly clear what should have been clear in the first place. It is his opinion that the gas companies have created a hardship on themselves. They have expensive lawyers. They should know to check out a Town's zoning code first to see what is permitted and what's not. It's not like the catch all provision we have is a stranger to New York zoning. It's all across the state. Supv Sumner said they didn't think that they had to. They thought they could continue with the DEC as they had in the past, ignoring local authority. Cl Leifer said the DEC is recognizing they have no land use authority. They regulate how the industry works, they don't have land use authority. When it comes to gravel mining, the cases also bear that out. Statutory change was made in response to case law. Even if the DEC permits larger mines, they don't. have land use authority. Cl Stelick said the media has bantered the word ban and this isn't a ban, but is a clarification of what has been on the books. 'There is nothing new here. Cl Leifer said it is new that the DEC will have to notify a municipality of a well permit. Supv Sumner said one reason for clarifving it in this way at the moment is to make it clear that it's not that we just overlooked gas drilling. We knew then, as we do now, that it is Page 4 of 16 0141; 8-21W1 1 an industrial use that is not suitable for the Town of Dryden. We don't now permit space ® shuttle launching pads. The idea of if it's not permitted, it is prohibited is important because there are things we probably haven't thought of yet. We don't know what technologies will be developed. CI Leifer said it's so you can slow things down and make you think about whether you want to permit something and how this new use will affect the entire town. If there are concerns, you can decide how they might be mitigated. Cl Stelick said, quoting Atty Perkins: "Forever is an awful long time ". He said zoning isn't forever. It's subject to change on a regular basis for anybody that's been proactive about this. What goes in place now, in the future is always subject to change. A proactive board needs to look at it that way. On the question of taking our time, he said we have been living with this for two years. It's been there day in and day out and he went into it with a balanced approach. He's not jaded by money, by lobbyists, by anything other than what he was voted into, and that's to represent the people of the Town of Dryden, and he knows who that is. His mom would have told him to make a decision based on what is right, and his decision tonight is based on what's right. There is no jadedness; he went into this looking at every way possible to take care of everybody in the Town of Dryden. As we all know, somebody will always walk away from the table unhappy. He has used a common sense approach to this. He has listened, looked, and read endless topics about the subject. The bottom line is: He has lived here his whole life. He owns two acres in the Town of Dryden and a burial plot. He %will be here forever. He has listened to a lot of people he respects. He looks forward to being able to cast his vote because the Town of Dryden is not an acceptable casualty to New York State's financial Roes. The need to plug financial faults at the state level doesn't preclude the Town of Dryden being protected just like NYC and Skaneateles are protected. He has a well. It's not filtered. Who «Rll protect him? He wants this place to be as prosperous as possible. He put ten years of his time on this Town Board and looks forward to two more, He wants this place to be prosperous, but also wants to respect landowner rights on both sides of this. This isn't the end; it's only the beginning and he looks forward to as many opportunities as possible to listen to approaches that might be acceptable to the Town of Dryden. But at this point he is firmly behind the way he will vote tonight. Supv Sumner said you have to know where you are now to figure out where you are going, and this is clarifying where we are now. She thanked board members for the time spent, and thanked residents who have expressed opinions on all sides and provided information, and for urging the board to move one way or the other. She said she thinks we will come to agree that this is the right decision tonight. RESOLUTION NO. 126 (2011) = RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF ADOPTING AMENDMENTS TO THE TOWN OF DRYDEN ZONING ORDINANCE CLARIFYING THE TOWN'S PROHIBITION OF NATURAL GAS EXPLORATION AND EXTRACTION Cl Leifer offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: • WHEREAS, the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance provides "No land or building shall hereafter be used or occupied and no building or part thereof shall hereafter be enlarged or its use altered unless such action is in Page 5of16 TR R -2 -11 conformance with all the regulations specified for the zone in which said action occurs and any special regulations ® pertinent thereto "; and WHEREAS, no Town of Dryden zoning district regulations permit, as an allowed use or use allowed by special permit, an outdoor factory or outdoor heavy industrial use such as are associated with natural gas exploration, extraction, treatment, storage, and the transportation of natural gas and natural gas exploration and production wastes; and WHEREAS, it is the intent of the Town Board by this amendment to the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance to clarify that natural gas exploration and extraction and the associated uses of land for outdoor factories and the heavy industrial uses associated therewith, including treatment, storage and transportation of natural gas exploration and production wastes, have not been, and are not permitted uses of land under the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, it is the further intent of the Town Board by this amendment of the Zoning Ordinance to clarify for the public, landowners and town officials that the use of land in the Town of Dryden for outdoor factories and for the exploration and extraction of natural gas and the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes is prohibited within the Town; WHEREAS, in 2003 the Town of Dryden Conservation Advisory Council completed an Open Space Inventory and reported that "all but a few residents in the western part of the Town depend on groundwater as their primary water source, and the Village of Dryden uses groundwater for its municipal water supply "; and WHEREAS, two hundred eighty-one (28 1) households in the western part of the Town rely on water from Cayuga Lake; and WHEREAS, Virgil Creek, Fall Creek, Cascadilla Creek, Six Mile Creek and their tributaries are part of the Cayuga Lake watershed; and WHEREAS, four drilled water wells are the Village of Dryden's water source, which wells exist in the Virgil Creek confined aquifer and the overlying soils do not provide adequate protection from potential contamination as reported in the preliminary results of the USGS Virgil Creek Aquifer Study commissioned by the Town and Tompkins County; and WHEREAS, the recharge area for the Virgil Creek aquit'er is in the Town of Dryden; and Pale 6 of 16 '1'B 8 -2 -I I WHEREAS, the Town is in, or partially within, the headwaters of Owasco Lake, Cayuga Lake, ®Susquehanna River, Six Mile Creek and Fall Creek, all of which are public drinking water sources for various municipalities and Cornell University; and WHEREAS, the New York State Department of Health completed a source water assessment of the Village of Dryden water system which assessment rated the susceptibility of the village water system for the potential for contamination and found, with respect to three of four wells, that the susceptibility of contamination was medium to high; and WHEREAS, protection of the Village of Dryden water source from potential contamination is an important goal for not only the Village of Dryden but also the Town; and WHEREAS, the Town has consistently been proactive in protecting its water resources and has adopted Local Law No. 4 of the year 2007 (the Town of Dryden Stormwater Management, Erosion and Sediment Control Law) and Local Law No. I of the year 2008 [a local law to prohibit illicit discharges and connections to the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4)j, both of which local laws exceed the requirements of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's regulations in SPDES General Permit No. GP -0 -10 -002; and isWHEREAS, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has mapped 35 Freshwater Wetlands either wholly or substantially situate in the Town; and WHEREAS, such maps do not show all wetland areas and unmapped wetlands not subject to NYSDEC ,jurisdiction continue to be at risk; and WHEREAS, there also are upwards of 3,727 acres of wetlands in the Town under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; and WHEREAS, substantial areas along Fall Creek, Virgil Creek, Six Mile Creek, Cascadilla Creek and Owasco Inlet within the Town are located within 100 -year floodplains containing hydric soils and wetlands under the jurisdiction of the Army Corps of Engineers; and WHEREAS, there. are substantial areas (approximately 13% of the land area) in the Town of Dryden where there are slopes greater than 15 percent, and WHEREAS, in its 1990 inventory and 2000 revision of the same, the Tompkins County Environmental Management Council identified 57 areas in the Town that are designated Unique Natural Areas (UNA) that harbor Pagc 7 of 16 TB 8-2-11 rare or endangered flora and fatma, unique geologic features or contain excellent examples of ecosystems or biotic communities; and WHEREAS, the 'rown's 2005 Comprehensive flan recognizes that mere designation of a UNA does not afford any tangible protections; and WHEREAS, the regulations promulgated under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQR) permit a town to designate specific geographic area~ as a critical environmental area (CEA) if it is found that such area has "an exceptional or unique character covering one or more of the following: and a benefit or threat to human health; (ii.) a natural setting (e.g., fish and wildlife habitat, forest and vegetation, open space and areas of important aesthetic or scenic quality); (iii.) agricultural, social, cultural, historic, archaeological, recreational, or educational values; or (iv.) an inherent ecological, geological or hydrological sensitivity to change that may be adversely affected by any change. "; and WHEREAS, in 2011 the Town of Dryden Conservation Board completed its review of all lands in the Town to determine those geographic areas having exceptional or unique environmental the town including characteristics, and compiled ® an inventory of Critical Environmental Areas (CEA) pursuant to the criteria found in 6 NYCRR 617.14(8), which inventory included not only the UNAs and Freshwater Wetlands, but other lands meeting such criteria such that approximately 52% of the Town may be situate within a CEA; and WHEREAS, thirty-five (35) potential CFAs have been identified, thirty -three (33) of which contain State or federal wetlands; and WHEREAS, the quality of life in the `town ot'Dryden depends on open space, conservation, tJNAs, CEAs, town and community association parks and trails, and abundant and relatively good quality drinking water available from aquifers underlying the town including the Fall Creek aquifer and Virgil Creek aquifer; and WHEREAS, a public hearing will be held on the CEA inventory prior to formal adoption by the Town Board; and WHEREAS, there is a continuing open debate among experts concerning the environmental, health and economic effects of natural gas exploration and extraction and the Town Board has reviewed scientific papers, reports and articles discussing such effects, all as more fully detailed hi Appendix I to this resolution, and Pagc 8 of 16 Tli 8-2 -1 I WHEREAS, it has not yet been conclusively determined that natural gas exploration and extraction is in the overall best interests of the residents of the Town of Dryden due to the presence of many UNAs, LEAs, Freshwater Wetlands (both mapped and unmapped), a significant nwnber of slopes greater than 15 percent, and dependence on groundwater as a source of public and private drinking water; and WHEREAS, impacts associated with natural gas exploration, extraction, treatment, storage and transportation include: concentrated traffic, extra4eavy thick traffic on town highways not designed for such traffic; disturbance, of land for clearing, grading, surface preparation and well pads; erosion and sediment deposition in local waterways; noise, dust; potential spillage of flowback water from drilling processes; constriction of new compressor stations, potential fragmentation of agricultural lands and forests; pollution of local surface waters and aquifers; and WHEREAS, the New York Court of Appeals has held that a town "is not obligated to permit the exploitation of any and all natural resources within the town as a permitted use if limiting that use is a reasonable exercise of its police powers to prevent damage to the rights of others and to promote the interests of the community as a whole;" and WHEREAS, the potential adverse impacts associated with natural gas exploration, extraction, treatment, storage, processing and transportation threaten the economic future of town residents and taxpayers and their quality ® of life; and WHEREAS, after review of available scientific research from both opponents of natural gas extraction and natural gas extraction industry advocates, the Town Board now seeks to reaffirm the protection of the residents of Dryden from the dangers associated with natural gas exploration, and extraction; and the treatment, storage and transportation of natural gas exploration and production wastes; and WHEREAS, to the extent that natural gas exploration has heretofore taken place in the Town of Dryden, the Town Board recognizes that due to the lack of sufficient notice of the issuance: of permits and/or the lack of such notice and insufficient local administrative oversight and the misinterpretation of local zoning authority, natural gas exploration may have taken place, and notwithstanding such previous exploration activities, the Town Board recognises that the legal concept of estoppel cannot be applied to the Town of Dryden and enforcement of its local laws and ordinances; and WHEREAS, the NYSDEC Preliminary Revised Draft SGEIS 2011 (Section 8.1.1.5) proposes that applicants for well permits will be required to identify whether the well pad is located in an area where the affected community has adopted a comprehensive plan or other local land use plan and whether the issuance of a well permit is inconsistent with such plan(s); and Pine 9 of 16 TB 8-2-11 WHL•'REAS, the 'Town has adopted a Comprehensive Plan (2005) and a Zoning Ordinance (1969) and is the process of revising the zoning regulations of the Town, and deems it critical to clarify that. under the Town's ® Comprehensive Plan, existing Zoning Ordinance and proposed 7A)ning Law that natural gas exploration and extraction are not permitted uses of any property in the Town; and WHEREAS, under existing regulations NYSDLC would not provide notice to the Town of the issuance of a well permit (unless the proposed well pad was in an agricultural district), and well permits were thereby issued without an opportunity for the Town to timely object and after a Negative Declaration (Notice of Determination of Non - Significance) had been issued by NIYSDLC; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendments to the Zoning Ordinance will clarify for NYSDEC and potential applicants for well permits for property in the Town, that such activities are not a permitted use of property in the Town; and 1AfHEREAS, the Town Board has received and reviewed the public comments received before, during and following a public hearing on the proposed amendments held on July 20, 2011, including from those individuals commenting on the issues as more fully detailed in Appendix 11 to this resolution; and is WHEREAS, a vast majority of the comments received by the Town Board before, during and following the public hearing were in favor of the proposed amendments; and follows: NOW, THEREFORE, the Town Board of the Town of Dryden finds, declares, determines and ordains as 1. the exploration for natural gas, the extraction of natural gas and the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and ancUor petroleum wastes production wastes and the accompanying use of land for an outdoor factory and heavy industrial use in the rural environment of Dryden poses a si&tificant threat to its residents' health, safety, and general welfare; 2, widespread environmental and human health impacts have resulted from natural gas exploration and extraction in other areas; 3. natural gas exploration, and the extraction or the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes within the Town, would endanger the health, safety and general welfare of the community through the deposit of toxins into the air, soil, water, environment, and in the bodies of residents; I'tgr 10 nFUi TB 8-2-11 ® 4, the protection of residents, neighborhoods, and the natural environment through its power to regulate and restrict the use of land for trade, industry or other purposes constitutes the highest and best use of such land use powers that the Town possesses; 5. clean air and water are essential to most resources and activities in the Dryden area and the quality of the air and the water will be degraded by natural gas exploration and extraction activities and/or the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes; 6. natural gas exploration and extraction activities and the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes may cause irreparable harm to public and private water supplies, pollution of the surface and ground water, soil, and air, and may cause cancer, lung disease, and respiratory diseases; 7, air, soil, and water contamination may occur during the different stages of natural gas exploration and extraction operations and the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes, and such contamui;ation could have adverse human health impacts; 8. spills of liquid and solid wastes that originate from the exploration, drilling for and extraction of natural gas (whether onsite or during the transportation of these products to treatment and/or disposal facilities) is not uncommon, and such products may come into contact with and contaminate and pollute surface waters, groundwater and/or soil; 9. a large number of the chemicals used in natural gas exploration and extraction and many of the constituents of natural gas exploration and production wastes are likely causes of adverse human health impacts; 10. natural gas exploration and production waste products are hazardous wastes., 11. the Town of Dryden through its land use powers under Town Law §§ 261 and 262 has the power to prohibit the exploration and extraction of natural gas and the storage, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes within the Town; Page t I of 16 TR 8-2 -1 1 I2_ this amendment to the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance clarifies that the Town of Dryden has, since the adoption of the original Zoning Ordinance, regulated and restricted the use of land for outdoor factories and hr~avy industrial uses such as are associated with the exploration and extraction of natural ¢as and the storage, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and/or petroleum production wastes; 13_ this amendment further reinforces the Town of Dryden 2005 Comprehensive Plan, which Comprehensive Plan notes that; (a) the Town of (Dryden should continue and expand its effiorls to protect and enhance environmental quality through direct actions, and steps to better protect the water resources of the Town, in order to protect them for fut►u'e generations, {b} the Fawn of Dryden comprises a large portion of the Cayuga Lake watershed and water quality therein is affected by discharges and runofF from a wide spectrum of local use activities in the Town, c} the Town of Dryden is n active particirant i a n the Cayuga Lake Watershed Tntermunicipal Organization which furthers watershed studies and protection activities, 14. the Town's 2005 Comprehensive Plan contemplates light industrial and warehousing enterprise, characterized by manufacturing processes that include fabrication, a54ernbly, treatment, packaging and distribution of finished products or parts predominantly from previously processed or prepared materials with the absence of tho }processing of raw Inateriais such as natural gas or natural gas exploration and production wastes_ 15. the protection ofthe health, safety and general welfare of residents, nei¢hborhoods, and the natural environment is also �m appropriate use of the town's police powers, 16, this amendment supports the policies of the State of New York "to coltservc, improve and protect its natural resources and environment and to prevent, abate, and control water, land and air pallutialt in order w enhance the health, safety and welfare of'the people of this Mate and their overall economic and ux.ial wall- being; and "to reduce or eliminate the tise of hazardnuw substances and the generation of such substancers, Pugi: 12 of 16 TB &2 -11 pollution or waste at the source in order to conserve, improve and protect New York's environment and natural resources; enhance the health, safety and welfare of its citizens..." 17. the Zoning Ordinance is not directed at the regulatory scheme for the operation of natural gas wells under ECL Article 23, it addresses land use and nuisance concerns and the protection of the health, safety and general welfare of the people of the Town of Dryden and the enhancement of its physical environment. 18. this amendment is enacted to protect and promote the health, safety and general welfare of present and future residents of the Town, and is an exercise of the Town's power to adopt land use regulations to protect the health, safety and general welfare of the current and future residents of the Town from adverse effects and impacts that would result if the Zoning Ordinance were to be interpreted as permitting land in the Town to be used for natural gas exploration and extraction and /or the storage, transfer, treatment or disposal of natural gas exploration and production wastes, and its police power and power to prohibit public nuisances. 0 19. this amendment is enacted pursuant to the authority set forth in To%%m Law §§ 261, 262, 264 and 265. 20. the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance is hereby amended as follows: Appendix A (Definitions) is amended by adding new definitions to read as follows: "Natural Gas" shall mean any gaseous substance, either combustible or noncombustible, which is produced in a natural state from the earth and which maintains a gaseous or rarified state at standard temperature and pressure conditions, and/or gaseous components or vapors occurring in or derived from petroleum or other hydrocarbons. "Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Exploration" shall mean geologic or geophysical activities related to the search for natural gas, petroleum or other subsurface hydrocarbons including prospecting, geophysical and geologic seistnic surveying and sampling techniques, which include but are not limited to core or rotary drilling or making an excavation in the search and evaluation of natural gas, petroleum, or other subsurface hydrocarbon deposits. "Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Exploration and Production Materials" shall mean any solid, semi- solid, liquid, semi- liquid or gaseous material used in the exploration or extraction of natural gas. "Natural Gas Exploration and /or Petroleum Production Wastes" shall mean any ® garbage, refuse, cuttings, sludge, flow -back fluids, produced waters or other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semi- solid, or contained gaseous Page 13 of 16 109 8-2-11 material that results from or is associated with the cxploration, drilling or extraction of natural gas and/or petroleum. "Natural Gas and/or Petrolclun Extraction" shall mean the digging or dril ling of a we I for the purposes of exploring for, developing or producuig natural gaq, petroleum or other subsurface hydrocarbons, "Nat+gal C�as and/or Petroleum Support Activities" shall mean the construction, use, or maintenance of a storage or staging yard, a water or fluid injection statio�y, a water fir fluid gathering station, a natural gas or petroleum storage facility. or a natural gas or petroleumn gathering line, venting station, or compressor associated with tho exploration or extraction of natural gas or petroleum_ 2. Article XX1 (Miscellaneous) is amended by adding a new Section 2104 to read as fallows: "Section 2104. Prahibitcd Uses. {I} Prohibition against the E xplVration for or Extraction of Natural Gas and ?or Petrole u m, No land in the Town shall be used; to conduct any exploration for natural gas �mdlor petroleum; to drill any well for natural gas and/or petroleum; to transfer, stare:, process or treat natural gas and/or petroleum; or to dispose cif natural gas and/or petroleumn exploration or production wastes; or to erect any derrick, bui Iding, or other structure; or to place any machinery or equipment for any such purposes_ (2) Prohibition against the Storage, Treatment and Disposal of natural Gas and /or Pen'oleum Exploration and Production MHICrials. No land In the Town shall be used for; the storage, transfer, treatment and,'or disposal of natural gas and/or petroleum exploration and production materh0s, (3) Prohibition against the Storage, Treatment and Disposal of'Narural Gas and /or Petroleum Exploration and Production Wastes_ Flo land in the Town shall he used Fur, the storage, tranSFer, treatment anti /or disposal of natural gns and/or petroleum exploration and production wZstes. (4) Prohibition against Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Support Activities_ No land in the Town shall be used for natural gas and/or petroleum support activities. (5) hiYalldity of Permits. No permit issued by any local, state or federal agenCy, commission or board for a apse which would violate the prohibitions of this sectit)n or of this Ordinance shall be deemed valid within the Town_„ 3_ The introductory paragraph of Subsection 1 of Section 806 (Quarries and Excavation, Topsoil Rcrnuval) of Itirticle .7CT11 (DISTRICT REGULA'I "IOIU: R- COA1FS} is amended to read as follows: Pagc 14 of 16 0 "I. The Town 13card may authorize the issuance of a special perm[ for the excavation and sale oftcipsoi1, sand, gravel, clay or other natural solid mineral or vegetable deposit, or the quarrying of any kind of rock forniattoll in tlle R -C and Et -D Zones only. No sand or gavel or other excavation operation, except a topsoil removal operation, shall be conduced on land of Jess than 20 acres in area. The Town board inust be guided by the public health, safety and general eve €fare, not only of the citizens of the Town of Dryden, but of any other municipality, and roust give particular consideration to certain factors as fol loins;" 4_ These amendments shall take effect upon adoption and vublication as provided by lake. 2;,r' C1 Solomon Roll Call Vote 1 Stelick Yes Cl Solomon Yos u}av Sumner Yes Cl Makar Yes C1 Leifer Yes Appendices referred to the above resolution are contained on the following pages, Page Is*FIt; '1913 R-2-] I Appendix I Scientific Papers, Studies and :Reports ® on Exploration and Extraction of Natural Gas Preliminary Virgil Creek Aquifer Study (USGS) Phases I, Il & 111 }-Howarth, Robert (Department of Ecology acid Environmental Biology — Cornell University) and Ingraffea, Anthony (School of Civil and Environmental Engineering — Cornell University) and Santoro, Renee — Alfelhane and the Greenhouse Gas .Footprint of 1lralural Gas .front Shale Formations — A letter (received 12 November 2010, accepted 13 March 2011) published at springerlink.com C'heinieals Used in I ydroulic Fracturing (prepared by U.S. 1 -louse of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce (April, 2011): Rumbach, Andrew — Natural Gas Drilling in the Avfarcellus Shale: Potential Impacts on the Tourism Economy of the Southern Pier Christopherson, Susan (Department of City and Regional Planning — Cornell University) — comments to `I "ompkins County Council of Governments June 23, 2011 To► n of llgiddhfield — Land Use Analysis: Ileav*v Industry and Oil, Gas or Solution 111fining and ® Drilling — prepared by Greenplan, Inc. May 10, 201 1 Kay, David — l•i'orking Paper Series — A Comprehensive Econoinic iny7act Analysis pf _ iatural Gas Exploration in the 114arcellus Shale: The L "conomic Itrthact of Marcellus Shale Drilling. 01hat have G1 1e Learned? What are the Limitations? (Cornell University, Community and Regional Development institute in the Department of Sociology) April, 2011 Riha, Susan and Rahm, Brian Analysis (�fAratural Gas 1.:vpl Resource Itnixicts f:'om Shale University) December, 2011 G. — YI'orking Paper Series — A Comprehensive Economic Impact gyration tit the Mar'cellus .Shale: Prantei vork for Assessittg ff'ater Gas Drilling (New York State Water Resources Institute at Cornell Frac Focus Chemical Registry_ Disclosure Registry — What chemicals are used (site visited April 18, 2011) frac Focus Chemical Registry Disclosure Registry — Why chemicals are used (site visited April 18, 2011) Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas — ,1'atural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Naiural Gas I'rochretion crud .its Transportation to Market, .Ianuary 2006 Shogren, Elizabeth — National Public Radio — Air Quality Concerns 'Threaten ., atural Gas s ® Image June 21, 2011 Zeller, Tom, Jr. — New York Times — Gas Has Its Oivn Environmental Problems April 11, 2011 APPENDIX I (continieed) Additional Statements, Studies, and Papers Relating to the Exploration and Extraction of ON Natural Gas A. C'hcnlicals, Air Quality, Publie Health Concerns 1) CPA, "Outdoor Air- Industry, Business, and Home: Oil and Natural Gas Production- Ad di#ional Info rmati on, 1iM2:ll -vv, epa. gov /oagps0Q1 /wrnmunily {detailsloil -gas adds in Co -hlnil (2) "Chemicals iri Natural Gas Operations," "Summary Statement,` h t tj)://w"rw.endc crinedisrupdon.corn ffi les/M ulhstatesurnrnary1- 2.7- I1 Final. 13df . {3) "Nat" Gas Operations from a public Health Perspective," September 2010, by Theo Col bon *, Carol Kwlatku wski, 'Kim 8 chtlltz, Mary Bachran, retrievablc from htt�: llv_ endocrinedisruptitr�x. conllfitcsJaturalOasanuscriptk 'DFO 13 I0.pdf. (4) 1 Cormunity Air Monitoring," a lecture and O�Ver Point presentation at the People's Gas and Oil Subunit. Pittsburgh, roveinber 19 &: 20, 2010, `Talk and Slides retrievable from http; Il pcnnsY1Ya1uU. si: erraclub _ors'moshannonlshalegars/PD Fsl Pain ell Wilma ubra- I-Icalth urveys- from -T -WY,Ddf For a similar list focused ou the health ef Ceas of emitted HAP's, VOC;s, BTF.X, and n- hexane, see EPA, "Outdoor Air- I'ndustry, business, and Horne: Oil and Natural G, m s Pro Inforation," 40 http:llww. epa. g_ ovl airlcommunitylcletai]sloil -gas_ 5) Air pollutants released during oil and gas development http:llwvv,4 , earthworksac d on. orgr'oi l gas ai rpo 11 tit i on .c I m () Dr, Colborn surnmar y chcrnicals, health effects, and some precautions that can be taken at http; 11www. endocAnedisruptio2i. comlche1111Cals.]tnulti8Wte.php . (7) W1Inia Subra "Community Air lon.itcdng," a lecture and PoweT Paint presentation by at the People's Gas and Oil Sun7mit, Pittsburgh, Novfember 19 & 20, 201 , http:l 1pennsyI van 91 a. sierraelub. orgl moshanri on/shale gas/PD Fs/Pane h_Wihna ubra- IlealthSurveys- from -T - WY.pdf (8) EPA, "About Air Toxics," http :Hvvw%w.epa,govlairlto icairine tnxi s,h #nil. See also EPA, "Air, Pollution Emissions { verview," http;ll.� r4�r_ epa .gov /alrqualit }�lernissris9lin 1. (9) EPA, "Al L ir Emission Sources, Basic Informatior," http;!l" v,+,epa,govlarrlenllss1oris baslc,htm #data lac, (10) Natural Gas Operations from a Public 'Health Perspective, , Thoc Col born, C'.aroI ,iatkowski, tun Schultz., and Mary Eachran, TED C, The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, Paonia; CO, USA= =RN PRESS: Aocept�ed for publication 111 the International Joulnal of Human and ologNal Risk Assessment, September 4, 2010. 1 (11) Expected publication: September- October 2011 ."ABSTRACT: The technology to recover natural gas depends on undisclosed types and amounts of toxic chemicals. A list of 944 products containing 632 chemicals used during natural gas operations Nvas compiled. Literature searches- were conducted to determine potential health effects of the 353 chemicals identified by Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) numbers. More than 75% of the chemicals could aft�eet the skin, eyes, and other sensory organs, and the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Approximately 40- 50% could affect the brain/nervous system, immune and cardiovascular systems, and the kidneys; 37% could affect the endocrine system; and 25% could cause cancer and mutations. These results indicate that many chemicals used during, the fracturing and drilling stages of gas operations may have long -term health effects that are not immediately expressed. In addition, an example was provided of waste evaporation pit residuals that contained numerous chemicals on the CERCLA and EPCRA lists of hazardous substances. The discussion highlights the difficulty of developuig effective water quality monitoring programs. To protect public health we recommend full disclosure of the contents of all products, extensive air and water monitoring, coordinated environmental/human health studies, and regulation of fracturing under the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act." (12) Air Pollution from hracking Hanns Health: A Doctor's Review of the Research (9/27/10) Hydraulic Fracturing Study - Comments to the EPA. Eric London, MD. September 27, 2010. (13) Plow Air Pollution Affects Health Near High - Traffic Areas (612003) (14) "Public Health Implications for Nfarcellus Shale Development" Charles Christen, DrPH, Med, Center for Healthy Environments and Communities University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, August 27, 2010 httn://www.chec.t)iu.edt/ documents /Ntlareellus %20SIialeJGSPH 8 11,277 0 MarcellusHealthOverview Christen.pdf (15) united States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce released a report lli April 2011 titled Chemicals Used in tlyldraulic Fracturing which states, "Yet questions about the safety of hydraulic fracturing, persist, which are compounded by the secrecy surrounding the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids" ( llttp:/ idemocrats, energycommerc .e,house.lzovlsites /dcfaulL/ tles /document.s/14ydraulic %2OFractu ti ng %o20R eport %204.18.11. pdf) (16) State University of New York at Buffalo researchers led by Tracy Bank reported that the Marcellus shale is naturally enriched in uranium and has enhanced solubility and mobility due to water -rock interactions over millions of years and hence produced water secondary to the (racking process contains unacceptably Ngh levels of radioactivity http:/I gsa. confex. cotiV gs a/ 201 0AMl fnalprogi -wn/abstract_181465.ht:m and htti� : / /�NtiNtiv.buffalo.edu/news/I 1885 (17) Fracking chemicals many of which are highly toxic can cause cancer httl)://earthwork'sactioii.org/oll and aas.cEin IIi http•/hNtii,,Av circleofblue org/waternews /201 Or'world/epa- armounces- study- to -re- examine -the- heal th- risks- of- hydrofrackinQ) 2 (18) A. Resolution of the Medical Society of the State of New York: "RESOLVED, That the Medical Society of the State of New York supports a moratorium on natural gas extraction using high volume hydraulic fracturing in New York State until valid information is available to evaluate the process for its potential effects on human health and the environment." Counties that passed their own calls for a moratorium include: Broome County Medical Society, Herkimer County Medical Society, Cayuga County Medical Society, Chemung County Medical Society, Chenango County Medical Society, Madison County Medical Society, Oneida County Medical Society, Onondaga County Medical Society, Oswego County Medical Society, Otsego County Medical Society, and Tompkins County Medical Society. The Delaware and Tioga Counties do not have separate Societies but fall under what is called the sixth District which also declared support for a moratorium. http: / /gdacc.wordpress.e.om /2010 /12 /10 /new -york- state - medical- societies -call- for - moratorium) (19) The preliminary revised SDGEIS released on or about July 1, 2011, does not ban known carcinogens B. Traffic, Noise, and other Environmental Effects (1) Average of 890 -1340 truck trips per well site Susan Christopherson at Cornell University http:lhy <NrNNt.�Jree.nchoices.comell.edu/ downloads! development /marcellusJMarcellus Prelim Resu is Its (2) Traffic Noise Increases Hypertension (12111;'2007) "Hypertension and Exposure to Noise Near Airports: The HYENA Study." Lars Jarup, Wolfgang Babisch, Danny I-IouthuUs, et al. Environmental Health Perspectives. 116: 329 -333. Online December 11, 2007. (3) Noise, Even During Sleep, Increases Stress and the Release of Stress Hormones (2003) "Stress Hormones in the Research on Cardiovascular Effects of Noise." W. Babisch. Noise & Health: A Quarterly Inter - disciplinary International Journal. 5(18):1 -11. 2003. (4) "The Costs of Chronic Noise Exposure for Terrestrial Organisms." Jesse R. Barber, Kevin R. Crooks, and Kurt M. Fristrup. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 25(3): 180 -189. September 16, 2009. (5) Compressor Station Noise Reduces Ovenbird Pairing Success (2007) "Chronic Industrial Noise Affects Pairing Success and Age Stricture of Ovenbirds Seiru-us aurocapilla." Lucas Habib, Eriii M. Bayne, and Stan Boutin. Journal of Applied Ecology. 44: 176 - 184.2007. (6) Songbird Density is Lower Near Compressor Stations (2008) "Impacts of Chronic 0 Ainthropogenic Noise from Energy - Sector Activity on Abundance of Songbirds in the Boreal Forest-" Frin M. Bayne, Lucas Habib, and Stan Boutin. Conservation Biology. 22: 1186- 1.193, 2008, En a Canadian boreal forest, the author, investigated total songbird density and density of individual species near noisy wropressor stations and nearby quiet well pads. They found that total soligUTd density was 33% lower at the noisy sites than at the quiet sites_ l el�sities ofthree species WCfe significantly logwer at the compressor stations sites than at sirlulznr quiet sites; and five species Were less likely to occur near ccmpre :<i r staholis than at the quiet well pads_ (7) Eloise Reduces Species 'kichnoss and Changes ,Species Interactions (2009) `6NOIse Pollution Changes Avian Co1onn ounitres and Species Interac #Ions.'' C. D. Francis, C. 11 , Ortega, A_ Cruz, Current Biology, 19; 1415- 14.19. 2009, "phis study. conducted in pinyon= juniper woodlands in north*estern flew Mexico, studied species composition and interactions at sites nea.r active natural gas compressor stations and M silxli1ar but quiet well pads €nearby. Tlley found that "noise alone reduces neiting species r,diness al-0 leads to different avian communitics," and suggest that "noise can have cascadhig consequences for communities through altered species interactions " (8) ( 10/12110) "Philly Academy Study Finds Gras DriIIing Threatens Streams_" Sandv Bauers, Philadelphia Inquirer. October l?, 2010, This artioie describes a preliroirnary study of Pen rsylvanla streams, which suggests that a high density ofdri11ing 111 the MarciAus Shale may degrade nearby g ream s, even if there are no spiIis or other ace i den ts. The study 'Cound that water conduotivity, an indicator of stilt C-oli tarn inati0n; was t�;t�ice as high 1n Streariis near high- dejisity drilling, and populations of salamanders and aquatic iiisects, two groups of animals sensitive to pollution, were 25 percent lowcr. [Vote that many fish feed on aquatic insects. J Results of the prelinihiary study, conducted by the Acadejrly of Mitural Sciences, wlII be used to apply For funding for a larger, more comprehensive study. David VeIinsky, VP of the A.cadeniy °s Pa t-rick Center liar Envi.ro rim enLai Research, is quoted iii the article as saying that he knew of no Simi tar suidies that had been:! completed. The article notes that, as of Oct. I, 2010, the ntnnber of N4arcelIus weIIs drilled 111 Pennc;yl van na 1 2,237; yet there have been no independent studies of their ecological conlsequv.-n ct s 1. Cir strts 13S; scientists are just iiow applying for funding for such studies, (9) On Sept, 23, ?010, Velinsky testiCed before joint cornmittces of the PhiladelPMa City Coun61 on the effects of Marcellus shale drilling on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. His remarks included a discussion of the, prell nji lixi., stream study. Vol in sky 's testimony is archived €>rt: http. l /www= ansp_orglabout!nc�%3�?slpdff David YelIIISk }+_C1tyCounelITestimon _20110=09= 23.pdf , Local impacts, Non- lfealth RclatiW (1) C,as exploration and extraction 'In the Marcellus shale is already affecting Tonipkins County. The Stale is not acting to mi.tiaa e� these effects. Lansing Star, -`Cornell Expert -Says Aydro fa ck iiig Already AtTecting N tw York," Friday, June 24, 20 11 00:0'0 11ttp: / /ANA -w,l MIS] ngstar.comino s-pageJ-7420-corneII- expert- says- hydrofackulg- already- al��cting- new -york . 0 (2 ) Gas and Oil Leases Cause a Negative Impact on residential Lending — Excerpt from statement made by Greg May, P – Residential Mortgage Lending Tompkins Trust Company, March 2.4, 201 l; http :llinnovattontrail.orglpostfgas -lease fine- print - impacts- home- loans. hW),//%vww.toiTl1)kjns co.org/tccopffias Drilling yocus Groups /LandValues_Asscssment.html :Ward: Gas company financing is Preventing re�identS 'ri-o]n getting mortgages, published S!] /11, http :!ltheclailyrevie�v,comlrLew�r / 4�ard- gas - comps .ray- fi3laocing- is,preveinting- residents -from- getGin g- mortgages - 1.11825 6 5 3) "Natural Gas Drilling in the MarcelI'LLs Shale; Potential Impacts on the Tourism Economy of the Southern "I ier;=' ST egi n,al Pluuni.ng & Development Board, info step]anning,org `°[The cumulative effects of wide spread gas drilling] threaten to do serious dajnage to the tourism sector by degrading visitor experiences and creainb an industrial landscape that far outlives the profitability oCgas extraction." p.10 http : /iwww- stQplann.lnrr.org /inde .asp ?pageid -l95 (4) Farm Iand is Damaged by Fracking; The League- of Women Voters of Penns lvania MarceIIus Shale Natural Gas Lxtraction StLLdy, 2009 -2010, Study Ouide 11, MarceIIus Shale Natural Gas: Envirornmental Impact, p. 8 :`When heavy chilling and fracking egwplineat travels over farm Iand, soil Corrlpaction occurs. Tbere are two types of soil compaction. First, topsoil colr�paction is caused by tire pressure, and this can severely reduce plant production in the short term. Second, subsoil compaction is caused by axle loads which reduce productivity for decades and cannot be alleviated over time by any natural means {Grafton County Conservation 1 1St] 1Qt, n.d,). It results in decreased soil percolatioil and increased soil run off. Thixs, in turn, leads to less growth o:F vegetation and mare soil erosion. One might compare topsoil compaction to a bicycle rider or car riding at a unifolni speed across the a well- drained lawn and subsoil cornpaction to a ful ly loaded cement mixer drivirlg across a lawn immcdiately after a heave rainfall_ The first creates tread marks while the second creates ruts that wi11 not be a]IeviWed by time alone." {5) "Effects of Ozoiie Air Pollution can Plants," Agriculntral Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Article last mockEled November 6, 20109 (6) Rand C1. 2010. "Hanumer L7own: Guide to Protecting Local Reads Impacted by Shale Gas Drilling,'' Working Paper Series For A Comprehensive Fcoiionuc. Impact Analysis of 'Natural Cras Extraction in the Marcellus Shale, Cornel l University Department of City and Regional Planning_ AVallable at; http:llgreenchoices. cornett ,edLL/developmentlmarcel I us/policy.cfrn (7) The League of Women Voters of Penusylvania Marcell us Shale Natural Gas Extraction Study, 2009 -2010, Study Guide 11, Marcellu s Shale Natural Gas; En viruanuental Impact. p_ 10 Heavy trucks cause potholes and break pavement, especially along the edges, Heavy trucks on gravel roads raise enough dust to change air quality. [See also "Traffic Studies" below,] {8) Gas Exploration and Extraction Effects on Local Housing 5 "Rradford County Placing Kids in roster Care Due to Housing -Shortage." ,lames Lowenstein. The Daily lLevie l'owanda, PA)- Aily 29, 0] 0; Jule 7, 2010 40 l,ttp:ll ��r�v,sungazette.co»3l page ?cantent.detailridl 45686.htrnl ?nay 011 (9) Effect of gas e- xploratioa and extraction industry on increases in crime and needs I .1or more emergency services Taft, PLB., (1981) l eepi�lg the Peace in the New �7Jild 11�est,1'ollce Magazl3le��ol. 4 (4)Dated:(July 1981)Pages; 8 -1 S; Oil and Energy Nevyr3, May 4, 2010, Harrisbul "�, PA, PRNCl Ys ire -[ hre +s ii re "The Ecomomics of Extracting natural Gas from Shale 1~ oiTllations," "Costs to Local Communities," Gasmain -org, h ttps:fl sites. go o g l e, cc�m!s i tcloutre aclnmateri al lecona�n i cs (10) "How Should e Think about the Econ Olin ic Consequences of Shale Gas Dri I11ng9," May 201 1., Susan C 36> tepherson and 'hied Rightor; gasleasing.cce,cornell.cdu! "']"he conslstent theme is that Ideal gov�rnn'rents — countics, cities, townships, villages — al-c subjected to a %vide trange of demands for new services or increased I eve] s of service, and that the adlr>tinist'rative capacity, std-tang levels, equipment, and o>trsl expertise needed to nleet those dt,mands are beyond anything that has been budgeted." (11) Susan C'lu'istopherson, Presentation to'1C;C� ,June 2i; 2011 I. Ile existing tax systems and current proposal for a severance tax are completely incladequate. to meet the needs of local l;rverilments to respond to Frocking- (12) The best a ,4rtlI Ie reseal.A shows that between 5.7 and 6 -3 percept of the adult popu.l abon of Ton3plcins Co Linty owrls all of the Iand under lease jor gas exploration and extraction- Dara gathered at the "f onlpkirts Counry Clerk's Office by: (Counted only leases signed between 1,+112005 aad 9/3012009) 2;33 dii'I'enmt narl,es appear as the privolpal name on a le�e: dote that this nu1-nber includes argdlti a #ions, such as Clturehes, school districts, cemeteries, toes, and clubs, who have leased their Iand, There are only 68 oftbese, so they are only 2.9 % of the total. For this put -pose, t=h organization vas counted as l individual. In some cases this overcounts because the salve individuals also have personal leases. In other cases it undercounts because mare than one person may share the royalties (although the 1>7 ore. peuple sharing royalties, the snialIer #hey are, of course). 1.6 adults signed pe>< lease (calculated from a sample o1: 140 leases): 3,731 lease holders; 3;731159,498 = 693 % of non- college- student, adult population {local voters} (13 The Estimated Income from Exi. ,sting hidustries Dwarfs What is Expected from teas Lplol-ation and Etra(;ti()n. "Drilling for Natural Gas in the -N ew York State M arcelIus Shale, ghat a1-e the Potential gains and risks? What are the trade- off-ST1 Dr. John Schwartz. Ithaca Collegc, June 2009, http:f /)r vw,tegasniap- orglliiedial arcellus %20 oyalties° o2O ompared %20to° o20Dther° o201nc omc.pdf 6 Estimated income from sources other than gas exploration and extraction over 20 years are: Farm Cash Receipls $48 billtcrn, Dairy Products, $39 billion, Grapes and 1 pine: $69 billion; Lsfimates of attractions that bring visitors: Tourisun 173 billion, Hunting and Fishing, S32 billion, Wildlife Watching, $32 billion; Total other of non gag extr�lClioxl: $392 billion; Estimated Natural Gas Income For 20 `ears will be $22 Billion (14 ) °:Drilling Deeper iuto Job Claims, The Actual Contribution ofMarcellus Shale to Peansylvania Job Growth." Stephen Hm.enber , June 20, 2011 , 'Keys tone Research Center. http:l ilceystoneresearch- org/ sitesrlc.eystonerescare li.org/filesIDnlling- Deeper -into- Jobs - Claims - Y 20- 2011_0 -pdf, 5) "The Economic Impact of Shale Gas Extraction: A review of ExisUrna Studies," By Thomas Ki nnaman, BucknelI Univgmi�sity, Forthcoming in Ecological Economics, DOI: 10.101 61j.ecole-co13.2011.02.005 http;ll %v %vnv.nim, scientist.com /article /�ing2 l ] 28193.400- economic - benefits- o.f- slialegas- extractio n-un cl ear, h ti-RI (1 ` How Should We Think About the Economic; Consequences of Shale Gas D] I lay 2011, Susan Christopherson and filed Rightor, gasleasing- cce- cornell.eclnl (17) MamelIus Shale Natural Tas Extrac tion Study, 2009 -2010; Study Guide 111, iarc:ellus Shale Nal'ural Gas: I #s Economic Impact, League c Women Voters of Pearlsylvania, p25, p27 -- ln 1,nost parts of Pennsyl vani a where drilling will occur, there is little if any existing irndusuy and infrastructure- Therefore. at least initia]Iy; firms and employees from outside of Pen nsyIvania wi11 conduct rnuch of the economic activity, Th1 s 1.1.ri11 lessen the impact on existing local businesses p- 2 "The higher paying jobs are in the drilling sector according Kelsey (Penn State Webinar presented in Indiana County, October 14, 2009). Kelsey estimated that three - quarters of the jobs require only a high school education, and local people are often hired as laborers and for security. Low paying jobs, such as #Bose foYUid inhospitality and local retail, are also created," p. 27 (1 ) "S o far. gas jobs main Iy iu u)e]a #ed fields," Scranton Times- "1 "ribLune, F_lizabe #h Skrapits, IMP: i/thed mes- to bune. com/ne sfsn- far - gas- 'obs- rnainl -in-reIaked-fields- 1.lQ6Q4 0i ixzzll R16 —,L KS 19) The Economic lmpact of Marc elhus $hale Gas Drilling What Have, We Learned? What are the Limitations? DaVId Kay, 1 April, 2D] 1, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Working Paper Series, A Comprehensive Economic. Impact Analysis Of Natural Gas Extraction In The Marcellus Shale, http:11ccle.c'DMell.edulener yc,limatechangelnaturaigasd(m.vi Documents /pdfs /kayf�)rmattedmarcellu s %20 orkingpaperrevise.d4- 4- 201I.pdf (20) :` ... smaller viral economies without much existing econuniic diversity, gas development Might offer the pessibi lily of a diversi tication strategy. Howvever, in such places the potential for a hard boom bust cycle, and for the gas industry's Competition wiih pre- exlstung econorniC anchors. may be the greatest. For some individuals and commurnities, #hc wave of big money would likely rise cuid fall W1th an abniptness that many would find deleterious even as for others, the wave would be more sustained and positivC." 7 (2 1) Are Energy - focusing Counties Benefiting? September, 2008 - revised 07'1110, Headwaters Economies, p. 221 from http• / /headwaterseconomics or(f/results ?cx= 016795607439837894123 /o3Anflymioitpi &cof--FO RID %3A9 &ie= tjTF, -8 &q= Fossil.,. Fuel +as +a+Development +Strate gy &sa.x =11 & " * ** In counties that have pursued energy extraction as an economic development strategy — places we call energy- focusing (EF) in this report —the long -term indicators suggest that relying on fossil fuel extraction is not an effective economic development strategy for competing in today's growing and more diverse western economy. P.22 (22) "Unanswered Questions About The Economic Impact of Gas Drilling, In the Marcellus Shale: Don't Jump to Conclusions," iMarch 27, 2010, Jannette M. Barth, Ph.D. http: / /Nv�vtiv.dangerdri l l ing.conll ?page_id °433 rhe entire Marcellus Shale region in New York may be at risk both economically and envirorvnentally. While the environmental risks have been a focus of concern, many stakeholders have assumed that a positive economic impact would result. In reality, the economic impact may very well be negative. And the likelihood is that gas drilling would adversely atTect other economic activities such as tourism and sport fishing and hunting. (23) The actual productivity of Marecllus Shale gas wells in appears to have been exaggerated according to ernails written by industry insiders. "Insiders Sound an Alarm Amid a Natural Gas Rush, ian Urbina, June , 2011 http://*vNn,Nnv.n V �rti rmes.com12011 /06126 /us /26gas. htrm 1 ?pagewanted= l &_r =1 http:// wlytiv. nytimes .com/interactive/us /nattiral- gas - drilling- do,,Nli1- documents- 4- intro.html?ref =us and (24) Shale Gas — Abundance or Mirage? w-hy The Marcellus Shale Will Disappoint Expectations,Arthur E. Berman Labyrinth Consulting Services, Inc., Washington, D.C. October 8, 2010; http: / /wtivw.theoildrtun.com /node /7076, October 28, 2010 (25) "Shale Gas or Shell Game," presentation at National People's Gas and Oil Surnmit, November 19, 2010 htt a /w%.%w.s ectraener vwateh.conl /w - content /u p loads /20l l /02ldeborallro ers- shalegasshellgame &df (26) TCCOG `four to Bradford County http: / /wvNvtiv.tomi)ki ns- 12- 15- 2010.pdf U. Water Resources (1) http : / /I)ubs.u4,;gs.Pov /fs/2009/30321/ (2) http • / /wwrv.nicholas.dukre.edL/hydi near- hydrofracking -sites Era 7 n Is— Osborn, fir., Vengosln, A.,'Warncr, N, & Jackson, R. B. (2011). Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas -well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Proceedings of the [rational Academy of Sciences, Doi: 10- 1 073!pnas. 1100682108. �" .pnas_orglcontentl108 /2;0/ ] 72, abstract (4} http'11 %VWWrtcL7asmap.orRi medial Water° o2OContamination° �2OFact° `20sheet pdf (5) Searchable database of all DEP Violatioans in Perinsy Ivan 1a related to gas extraction a. http= / /wkv�, . bizoeurnals .wiayPittsburpli'datacenter /search- all- rnareellus- sliale- violations.htm]` UpSession=C)761 21 91 1856781 b. Anya LiNak of the Pittsburgh Business Times has compiled tmponwit data about the enforcement by the Pen nsylvan » ia Department of Environmetal Protection �)11'9as Aril lung regulations that have been sfrengtheried since '2008. Litvak reports the following: i_ 1, 5803 gas drilling rule violations issued from 2048 to May 2011 ii. 71he rate of violations is declining, dropping f'roin one violation per every 2 N -cells or one violation for evcry 4 1nspe�ctions in 20 10 to one violanon for every six inspections or one vIoIation far every three WCIJs in 2011. iii. 253 violations were issued in April and May 2011 and 313 in the first 3 months Of 20111 IV, DEP more than doubled gas drillinb enforcement staff, increasing employees from 88 to 202, by hiring in 2009 and twice in 2010. () http Wwwwmicho Ias_ duke,edulcgclHydrauJcFracntrin gWhite papel OX 1 pdf {7) http_!lwww.npr.or 411 /08/02/ 13882096 .6 / vo]Ties- o %rer- water -as- natural- as- !'racking- expands 9 Appendix I1- A Public Hearing Continents — see attached minutes of July 20, 20111 TOWN OF DRYDEN T0%WN BOARD MEETING jugry 207 2011 Present; Supervisor hilary Ann Sumner, C1 Stephen Steh k5 C1 Jason Leifer, Cl David Makar Excused; Cl Joseph Solomon Elected Officials; jack Bush, Highway Superintendent Other Town Staff: Patricia C. Millard, Deputy Town Clerk Kevin Ezc11, Code Enforcement Officer ,Jane Nicholson, Planner Mahlon Perkins, Town Attorney Sup {F Sumner oper4ed the meeting at 7:01 p,m. and board members and Xuests participated in the pledge of allegiance. PUBLIC HEARING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT PROTECTION FROM NATURAL CAS EXPLORATION AND EXTRACTION ACTIVITIES LAW Supv Sumner opened the public hearing at 7:p7 p.m_ and dispensed with reading the public notice that was punished In The Ithaca Journal. Stzpv Sumner opened the floor to public, comments. Nate: Unless otherwise noted, all speakers are Dryden Town residents and staged either their general or specific address token they began 8pealcing. Peter Davies - Dryden has many things going for it. WC: have pure water and clean air, Now vie have the potential of having this pure water and cleat's air destroyed, I think by now we are all familiar with the problems in this industry in other parts of the country; water contamination, Families on battled water, dead cattle, peopie with met],a.ne in their water told to open their windows to take showers. Town Board of the Town of Dryden, WC are gathered here today to aslc you for one thing, Please protect us from this menace. Please pass this ordinance to ban fracking as we know it in the Town of Dryden. Vicki Meyers Wallen , I am a scientist and a veterinarian and I study birth defects. T've lived here for more than 20 years and I've lived in many other places before, but it's clear to me that Ehis place is really a_ unique place and what we have here is priceless. I second everything that Peter Davies said. I also say that we should not take what we have deee for granted. Once we ruin our health and our environment, we Cannot put it back together. Life is a ono -way street. It's not ❑nly my health I'm concerned about: it's the - children and grandchildren here. We don't know what thQ long -term consequences are, let alone the short -term cornsequLnceg_ I ask you, what are %ve willing to accept here? We have all these unknown factors_ Is there any amount of money that would compensate the possibility of birth defects in our children or cancer in Our spouse_ T am not willi rig to accept those risks. laracking is an uncontrolled experiment, It's an experiment that is going on in Pennsylvania, If we are wise, wo will sit hack on our assets and watch what happens there both short -term and long -term. 1 am For the town banning thin activity in our area_ and I hope you have the courage to do that, TB 7 -:tt -I 1 DRAFT Jim Crawford - I call for a rejection of fear mongering and all kinds of emotional appeals. This year, the international energy agency more than doubled its recent 2008 estimate of worldwide natural gas reserves due to new extraction technologies. They said that natural gas is abundant, affordable and clean burning relative to other fuels. Articles have noted that the U.S. is now virtually self - sustaining in its natural gas needs. I think the Dryden 'Town Board needs to consider our energy future as you also consider the safety concerns. Last month, the New York Times ran an article called Insider's Sound an Alarm amid Natural a Gas Rush" and very soon came into a lot of criticism for that. Their own public editor Arthur Brisbane criticized the paper for running an article that was misleading and lacking objectivity. What's going on when revered outlets like the New York Times find themselves climbing out on a lirnb and then needing to climb back? To date, too many groups and officials are playing to emotions rather than reason. The very name Shale Shock and those black and red NO FRACK signs with dripping letters seem obviously calculated to appeal to an emotional treatment of the issue. That's extremely unfortunate. Regarding the local petition asking for a drilling ban, the number of signatures collected would be more meaningful if they also reported the number of Dryden residents declining to sign the petition. Last Friday, the Ithaca Journal reported on a Sienna College poll which reported rough parity in people's regard for the recent DEC report, but they also had another figure which was a 55 -33% spread in the degree of trust people- had for their neighbors based upon their being for or against fracking. I would like to suggest that when Sienna College is sampling the very same people and they find parity on one question and such a split on others, we're looking at a direct readout on the emotional nature of this debate. Please give your attention to rational discussion of how to balance our environmental concerns with concern for our energy future. We should be rejoicing in technology which moves us toward energy self- sufficiency and we should reject questioning our neighbors' motives and integrity. The 'Town Board should be taking a cautious approach to the risks and the costs of drilling. Please don't try to be heroes by getting ahead of state evaluations and fashionable pressure groups. Is the Town also considering mandatory energy conservation? Where, should our energy future come from? Dave Macknee - Has lived in the town 47 years. There were many good businesses in this area, Ithaca, Dryden included, there were a lot of good companies here, and that's why I bought property here and have been paying taxes on it for 47 years. My taxes help pay salaries and support the schools in the area. 1 don't think it's right that you would not wait and allow people to see what happens. "You guys" started with the DEC and now nobody believes what they hear - they don't even believe their own government. We're not even finished with it yet. When we finish with it, then maybe we'd have a thing that says, do it or don't do it, but until we do that, I don't think we should close it off. The anointed one has closed two coal mines and he wants by 20.15, two of the biggest electric companies to be clean, which is an impossibiliti. I hope when people run out of coal or the electric company triples your electric prices, that you realize it's your own fault. Art Berkey - Lives on 2 -acre lot which is not large enough for a gas lease, so I have no direct financial stake in the fr-aeking ban or not, however I request you vote against the institution of a ban for the following reasons: while I share the concern of maintaining safe water supply, I have been unable to find on the web documentation of pollution of an aquifer despite fracking being conducted for some 20-4• years. I did find an instance of surface water spill in to a stream, however new technology using methane rather than toxic liquids would eliminate runoff and also the road damage from trucks transporting the liquid for disposal. No operation is ever 100% risk free, but the EPA regulations are designed for that purpose. There appears to be major legal jurisdictional questions that predictably will result in legal action by gas companies. Litigation costs to the Court of Appeals are estimated at $IOOK. I do not wish that our tax dollars will be used for this purpose. The Town of Ithaca has already incurred this litigation liability for its residents. Finally, and of most importance, a ban would constitute confiscation of residents' mineral rights without compensation. For example, yesterday at a Page 2 of 28 TO 7-20-11 DRAFT senior luncheon, a retired resident with 11 acres and a spouse disabled with ALS mentioned she was negotiating for a gas lease for about $25,000 plus 20% royalties. A ban would unfairly eliminate this income. Gas production is the one asset with potential to provide the badly needed economic stimulus for upstate New York and should be pursued under strict regulations protecting the environment. Henry Kramer — i speak to unjust confiscation of land owner's rights and the clouding of titles on Dryden land by a ban. I do not advocate unregulated development. Our environment must be protected with narrowly tailored regulation, preferably a uniform statewide, addressing of specific problems. Lease offers in Central New York of $25 an acre with 12% royalties have already grown to $3000 per acre and 20% royalties. A ban means for 100 acres, at least $300,000 in wealth is simply wiped out. For 10 acres, $30,000 vanishes from its owner's pocket. That's 100% tax rate. How's that for a local tax levy? Sound fair to you? If the board votes a ban at $3000 value an acre, it votes to confiscate at least $175 million of Dryden's wealth. 'That's taking the equivalent of the town's total current tax levy each year until 2074. A ban means turning our backs on $17,500 per capita for every adult, $80,000 per parcel of land over 2.5 acres. If each of these 2200 parcels has 2.5 people in the household, 5500 people directly benefit and that's 42 %-of Dryden's total population. Not a mere few and all of us will gain from the economic benefit. A ban clouds titles to 41% of land. The courts in equity will extend leases so the energy companies get the full lease period. With a ban, properties may carry liens forever; real trouble for those who try to sell their land or try to mortgage it. Energy development will help many hard working people who are land rich and cash poor or underemployed. It'll recapitalize our farms. For town government and educating our kids, safe development will raise new revenue. Given government's fiscal crisis and tax cap, we must cut services. Energy development could pay for schools and for roads. Careful, safe energy development is possible. Consider the facts; look at Dryden Safe Energy Coalition website at DrydenSAC.org. Nothing is risk free, but a total ban is a very bad idea indeed. ® Jane Edwards —1 think we can preserve the health and longevity of all who live in the Town of Dryden by preventing hydrofracking drilling. Such industrial action will destroy the tenor of what we have; potentially harm the safety of our water. I don't want to live with noise, with methane gas smells, with crowded roads or lower property values. I don't want our quality of life to be destroyed. Just for example, the Yellow Barn Water district is surrounded totally by gas leased land. I'm sure that the drilling will potentially affect our four (4) little wells that take care of 250-+ people. It is just a couple of thousand feet away. This is just one example of what could happen, but truly, we are all connected and gas drilling is going to affect all of us, even those who will make the millions. They will still have a very poor quality of life. Charles DeMotte — I want to speak in favor of the ordinance. There is sundry evidence to show that fracking is dangerous to communities. It can affect long term health. We don't know fully what the long term affects will be but there is evidence to show that there is a lot of pollution involved with that. Secondly, that once you let multi - national and /or large corporations in, you cannot rely on the fact that they will protect or look after environmental safety. Thirdly, opening the door to gas drilling will definitely affect the infrastructure of the community in terms of noise pollution, traffic, and things like this, far beyond what Dryden can handle successfully. Fourthly, the Town of Dryden is growing in germs of population, it will continue to grow, and this is incompatible when you look at the populated areas in the town — how this would be impacted by gas drilling. And finally, decisions as to the health and well being of the community should always trump potential revenues that could be gained as a consequence. Caren Cooper — Questioned extra protection for New York City water supply. Calls for equal protection for our water here in the Town of Dryden. The value of water is not about the density of people; it's about the dignity of all people. Of course our water is as important to protect as ® New York City water and Syracuse water, and so are our natural resources and our economy and our quality of life. None of that should be sacrificed for this. Fracking is a change we don't Pnge 3 of 28 TD T -20 -11 DRAFT need and it's one we didn't ask for. We didn't ask for these people to come knocking on our doors trying to sell us these pipe dreams. It is not going to better our town. There is nothing broken here in Dryden that fracking is going to tix. I ask the Town Board to provide the protection that the state is failing to provide equally to all of its citizens. Look out for us here and please ban fracking in Dryyen. Debrorah Cippola Dennis - The Board has heard several times from me on this issue, so I won't go on about my opinions on hydrofracking and the dangers of this evil industry. I'll simply say that I support this resolution and the amendment and I'm hopeful that you will move expeditiously to get it in place. 1'd like to express my sincere gratitude for everything that you (the Town Board) have done with respect to this issue. You've come a tremendous distance in the past year. I feel that you've listened to the people, you've researched this matter, and you've taken bold action to protect your community. It's what we expect when we go to the polls in. November. Even though we are often disappointed with respect to our state and federal representatives, you've shown us we can trust you to do the right thing here at the local level. I look fornrard to continuing to work with you to ensure that our town remains protected through the upcoming zoning changes. Joanne Cippola Dennis - I want to thank all of you (the residents) for coming out tonight. I became a member of DRAC once T learned that our dream home we were building was surrounded by leased property. For more than two years, we have been studying the entire process of methane gas development throughout: America. Having just returned from another grip out west, I was able to see several states affected by gas development. In Wyoming, where my brother lives, the water is delivered to water buffaloes because the energy corporations used clean water, contaminated it, and now the corporations control the water. The air is reported to be as toxic as L.A. This is happening in each state fracking shale takes place. It isn't if you get contamination, it's when and how bad. We learned that shale gas production can only be accomplished with widespread industrialization of an entire region. The tactics corporations use to convince governors to allow them to drill arc well- practiced and successful in many states now overrun by drillers. Industry convinces a governor it's gonna be done safely here - needed jobs are abundant - and that it will end our dependency on foreign oil. For starters, we're talking about methane gas, not crude oil. The jobs will be plentiful, but not for New Yorkers; theyll be brought in from other states as they are trained in complex and dangerous activities of extracting methane gas. Young guys are the ones they recruit. They're young, they're healthy, and they never ask any questions of what they are exposed to. We have learned fracking shale gas is a cause and effect practice. Water contamination is probable. Air is laden lAth diesel fuel. Hundreds of thousands of heavy vehicles fill the air with benzene - a very dangerous, known carcinogen - is present at each site beginning immediately, and it doesn't dissipate. The ozone occurs at ground level which is extremely hartnful to humans. Benzene is a killer that causes cancer and leukemia. My sister lives in 1\orth Dakota where drilling has overtaken them. She cares for a young 7- year -old boy who suffers from Leukemia, requires cxtensive and expensive health care not paid for by the industry that caused it. My neighbor is now partners with the industry that seeks to destroy my American dream, risk my health, safety and water, ruin my investment along with my plans. Since when is it American to allow a drilling company to use your property to steal from your neighbors, which is what hydraulic fracturing does. Nancy Morgan - 1 have felt very proud of my town government over recent months as you listened to citizens and studied so carefully the issues surrounding the likely intrusion of the hydrofacking industry here. "There was an earlier environmental threat to my neighborhood which was the siting of a new county landfill in the middle of a wetland in West Dryden, near to where there had already been a landfill before. In that case, once the decision was final, the County Government recognized its responsibility to protect property values in the area surrounding the landfill site. They created the landfill neighborhood protection program. If participating landowners could not get a fair price for their property when they wanted to sell Page 4 of 28 TB 7 -2r 11 DxAF,r it, Tompkins County paid them the difference between what would have been fair market value if not f ❑r the landfill and the best offer received with1n a certain amount of time. The prograrn compensated many West Dryden neighbors before the site was given up- Now there is a much greater threat to our environment; not ,just in West Dryden but in all of Dryden- Gas drilling operations %gill, if allowed, turn cerinin areas into noisy, obnoxious, industrial sites; water wells and streams near them wi11 be at risk for contamination; neighbors will begin to have health problems like headaches and difficulty breathing and property values near these i ndustrial sites will plunge accordingly. Will we be able to look to the enemy companies for compensation? Definitely not- Their only responsibility %vill be to their shareholders far away. We are so fortunate, once again, to have a local governmetlt that recogni-acs its responsibility to protect tba people who live here and which is working hard W live up to that responsibility in practical, proactive ways. The time has finally came to votc on a sensible amendment to our zoning law in order to keep out this type of heavy industrial use: and 1 Zvi]] thank you the rest of my life for taking this important and courageous a.0iOn, Ron Szymanski — As of Ju n 15, one of the things you didn't have access to was the DEC report,- Now this report is out and what we do know is that throtiigh exhaustive study and through the fact Ending that they ltavc spent with going to other states, answering all the questions that we've heard here today, and through what is considered now they arc the: experts in this p€Mrticular issue of hydrofracking, They have found it to be safe to cfr;ll in Dryden. This is what we need to do to rolicve the pressures, This is a very ern obona1 issue, which I recognize, and everybody 1has a right to their opinion - Wi k need to have more cornmunigF outreach on this. MTT has aIso put out a report recently on natural gas - 187 page multi disciplinary report - that needs to be read by all of the residents here in Dryden. We have a very educated community that when we get together in a community outreach type of way like we did this past week with 'F LOG, we cacti aU learn a lot more. This issue needs to be resolved. The law fl) at you're looking at right now is extreme. We need to have something that wi11 bring Dryden r.❑gether, We don't need a type of legal action that would tear the community apart, We need to have this Town Board come together and bring this community together, Much like Bruno Schickel said iii the last meeting, there is a lot of rnidclle ground here. 1 welcome getting together with my fcilow residents to resolve this issue and carne up with a way. We do know that the tax base will be inercased- Cur school districts need it de aperately. We a]] need it. We need to look into this issue. I have wme public comments pig the same vein as the IDFC - especially by anti - drilling people - made a very forceful paint that we needed to have comments responded to before you make a vote on this amendment. i would like these public comments to be responded to. Jack Bradbury - Several people have argued that you would be talc ing their property rights away and that it's unfair. That may be true if they are just having a parEy on their property, but when they drill on their property, and it goes under my land acid ruins my water, which we creune here from San Diego to get. That's not a single person issue, that's a ganeral issue. In fact, it's a classical tragedy of the commons problem. That's ghat Iauma and regulations and dcmocratic action are designed to do, which is to protect the majority of the people, We moved here to retire, We love it here- Dater - we'jc traveled all over the weld and water is orEe of the most important resources you can have. We've been in places that have crappy water and no water. One reason we came; here fmrn San Dicgo is it has water, and its great water. I've never had tea and coffee hike this, There are accidents that occur y in y o ' g, Colorado, Texas, Pennsylvania - we know than casings crack, we know that storage ponds leak; aTW we know that truck drivers who have had too many beers at our local business can sometimes drive in the creek- It that happens, those of us on Twells, have no recourse. You're not going to pipe water to Us an the other side of Bezemer Hill, We strongly urge you to pass the ore inance, Clifford Norte - I've tried to make a living here and found it increasingly difficult, i could Have benefited fairly substantially by leasing my property for gas, I o},.ose oat to- I didn't like some of the laxtguage in the coritract, I like to think that Vin smart enough to make some of my 3'Itbo 5 of 28 TB 7 -20 -1 1 DRAFT decisions on my own. Government has become all- intrusive. What we're forgetting here - a lot of the negatives with this gas exploration will be for a limited amount of time. There's not an energy source that doesn't have some risk. We need to study and plan and mitigate risk as much as we can but what I feel is happening here is the door is being slammed shut with no opportunity for the middle ground for discussion, for rational thought., i see this current issue as just one more instance where zoning and a vocal minority uses their sway to prevent anything from happening here. We aren't all in a position to live happily ever after with a pension. Some of us need to continue to have our land produce something besides taxes. Buzz Lavine - We're looking for protection from the gas industry beast. With every new government report, it looks more certain that needed protection won't come from either the Federal or the State government. The gas industry- plainly spends unmatchable sums of money on lobbying, campaign funds, propaganda, so- called scientific studies and the like. They still assure us that gas drilling is perfectly safe, no problems. Then when the many problems keep occurring, they spend unmatchable sums of money denying those problems and buying non- disclosure agreements. I've heard some guys call the gas industry "the dirtiest, slimiest, most arrogant and negligent that you can imagine." Not the kind of neighbors we want. In short, we don't want to live in a proverbial company town; certainly not one run by that beast of an industry. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for keeping Dryden from becoming that kind of company town and I've written a few words to muse on this issue. if we frack the iVslarcellus formations and rush in with tweak regulations, well wake tomorrow to disastrous implications. As it turns out, even New York's fracking will lower property valuations and limit chances on mortgage applications. We'll lose our property rights to condemnations and gain unexpected liabilities and obligations. Fracking will increase our hospitalizations and also our future litigations. It'll ruin our quality of life reputations and our clean water affectations. It'll also raise our property taxations and lose our kids to out libations. it'll recluire costly reparations and burden future generations, perhaps worst of all, it'll cause neighborhood transformations with massive unregulated industratlizations. 11111 these and many other degradations, these are all unneeded frustrations, unneeded trials and tribulations. Yes, gas leases are attractive temptations, but let's be smart and have some patience. Let's not join the league of company town nations; rather the league of community spirited town associations. Jack Edmonds - I'm one of those that signs a ]case before I luiew what it was all about. I've since researched the issue and find that the threat to our water supply is unconscionable. I'm at the stage of life where legacy is important to me. I have cancer and 1 have periods in which it is no fun. I'm doing alright right now. The chemicals used are known carcinogens and known to the industry to be carcinogens. I've attended a presentation by the industry in which they explained the process and listed some of the chemicals that they use and the concentrations. The concentrations that they use are in orders of magnitude that are beyond safe levels. The industry also uses chemicals that they don't disclose under the guise of being proprietary. That's unacceptable. The notion posed earlier was that opposition is an emotional response and is anti- technology. As a well thought out technologist and researcher, i find that to be downright. insulting. Legacy is important. What do we leave around for our friends, neighbors, family, the community? Do we poison our water supply for the enrichment of a few? Or do we consider the legacy that we leave others? Ben Haith - Resident of Auburn. Geologist with the Palmeri -on Group, a consulting firm in Syracuse and am here on behalf of the Independent Oil &. Gas Association of New York, though I assure you i am not being paid by them. I just wanted to share some numbers. In Cayuga County, where I live, there are 315 active, producing gas wells. Last year, they produced over one (1) billion cubic feet of gas, which is worth over $4,000,000. It's enough to heat over 13,000 Northeast homes. it's not just: big oil that owns these. The Auburn School District owns wells. The Union Springs School District owns wells. Dickman Farms - one of the best nurseries around - owns wells. Seventh Day Adventist Church owns wells. These are operators, not just Pose 6 of 28 "fB , D kt lease owners - T,ocal residents own and. operate these wells, T think it's u11 i to cornpam wha� is going to happen irk New York to other states, The DEC, the new sGE18 is over J.000 pages thick. It's the strictest regulations in the country. The DCC says it will not permit a well it cannot regulate, 5,2°�fl is the unemployment rate in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. I Lhink that's a pretty good indication jobs aren't going to out of seaters, Chemicals are being disclosed. Not only are hydrofacturin,g companies required to disclose them to the state, they are volUntarily posting thom on their website; the entire list. Lang -term consequences: use do know what the long -term consequences are — wells have been drilled in New York since 1821, they have been fractured since .1950. I'm pre Lty sure that when dri%?�ng through Cayuga County, With their 315 producing wells, you won't even know they're there, Joe Wilson -1 went door to door with a petition to ban hydmfrarking from the Town of Dryden, 85% of the, 100 people that I found at home, when F was w&lkiag the petition around, signed it, A simple principle is always applied in this country w ith regard to the use of property, It is that you can do whatever you want on your property as long as it doesn't harm or devalue the property of someone else. The history of fracking ill this country shows, and t1,is also applies to mineral extraction of other sorts, that these industries create air, light, and noise pollution. They destroy local infrastructure, fields and forests. F racking and other mineral extraction also raises local government costs by incroasing the needs for emergency sentices, school services, jail and police services. It drives fixed income residerkta out and reduces the local residential property values- Also, Multi- national corporations can take our minerals, make a big profit, and pay no taxes- Because fracking on a few people's property brings so much harm to so many of our residents across the country, and it will here as well, tracking must be banned, Judy Pie rpont - [ want. to thank the Board so much for all the thought zind work you leave put in to bringing this ordinance to us for a hearing. 'You have deeply understood the extraordinary threat to this town and our lives from this new gas drilling- There are many stories of people finding out too late what is really going to be done, on their Ian and in their neighborhood. In most cases, the reality is far worse than any land leases' could have imagined, coming out of Pennsylvania as well as Colorado, Wyorning, Texas. On the positive side, Tare have the advantage of being forewarned by those in other states who wem wiIIiag to speak out about their experience- We disregard to our peril the witness of people who have personally experienced the u ne pected consequences of drilling in L'heir lives; the grave harm done to them, their property and livelihoods, the livability of their homes and surroundings- [ {vas going to react to you a bit from the witness of a Pennsylvania- man who loascd his 190 acre faxrn in goo faith and now finds himself in a nightmare, but it's too long, so I'll just have to mention some of the things that he wasn't expecting which could easily happen, It did not come out as he imagine[!. The well far the barn and the original farm house was so contaminated with methane that the hydrologist thought it would explode so the well pump was disconnected for b months and water was trucked in by the gas company for the anima Is and spring water for the hum,ans- Luckily he had certifted baseline testing done beforehand, He says the gas companies have a very systematic play book. They have two shies, a friendly, neighborly, give $35,000 to the fire company, and then a ruthle9s, no4olds barred side, Threc times they threatened 11,at in 24 hours they were going to stop trucking in water for the cows in our barn unless we agreed to things. These things include non- disclosure aggrceinents, consent not to sue- There are things that we don't know because of the silence earn pelled in other people's lives. This man had the courage to speak ouL. There is so much risk, so much deception on the part of the industry that I do not believe this drilling can be done safer. IL' is rational to close the door On sornething that could be unacccpta.bly damaging- 1 am determined that this plague will not come to Dryden- Craig Schutt - I lived on and operated a dairy farm in the Town For over 4.0 years of my life, so my family and 1 have a strong connection to the land, water, and other res ❑rxrces in t]1e town. The last thing we want to see is a degradation or de&tructian of any of these resources - That said, there are factors to consider before a law is enacted completely banning gas exploration in Pogo 7 of 28 TB 7 -20 -11 DRAFT the town. I'm the first to say this kind of development needs to be done carefully and with caution, making sure adequate protections are in place, but I do not agree with a wholesale ban on this activity for several reasons. We all recognize that much of this activity will take place on farm or forest lands. As a former farmer, I believe banning gas drilling altogether is an infringement of property rights of the very people who in many cases have been working this land and paying taxes on it for generations. I've heard accusations by some during the debate that farmers are greedy and don't care what happens to the water or land as long as their financial benefits are substantial. That couldn't be further from the truth. Clean water and healthy huid is the life blood of agriculture. Dryden farmers are as concerned as anyone, if not more so, about protecting these resources. Without these, they have nothing. The proposed ban is extinguishing property rights on hard- worlcing, tax - paying, land owners with no compensation. The town recently purchased development rights from a farm to preserve that land and keep it in agriculture. in essence, that transaction extinguishes the rights of the farmer to sell any of that land for development ever, but in this case, the farmer was paid a fair price by the `1'own for those rights, and I applaud the Town. Supervisor Sumner - The rights were purchased by the State. Craig Schutt - The Tow-ri jumped in and helped with that though to keep the project going. Supervisor Sumner - Yes, but it was state funding. Craig Schutt - Yet, I've heard of no plan to compensate land owners for losing their gas rights, yet the town proposes to extinguish these land owner rights. How do you, the Board, reconcile that contradiction, because I personally think there is a contraction? I ask the Board please to consider any action carefully and cautiously, listen to all residents, and please try to tc-ike the emotion out of the debate and proceed as informed as possible. Only then will you be in a position to take an informed and rational course of action. It's my hope that all sides of this debate are given mutual respect and that civility will reign. Doug Barton - I'm from Barton Valley Farms. It's been worked by my family since 1838. We have a deep love for our little valley up there and for the Town of Dryden. I've been very involved with the Town of Dryden for many, many years. I trucked some of your children to school for 36 years. I'd like to say that I believe that a ban on gas drilling in this town would be a mistake in terms of the fact that it's closing the doors, as has been said tonight, on all the possibilities. There is a need for a growing income for the town, there is a need for a growing income for the school systems, the fire department, all of these things. My taxes go up every year as yours do too. My income is going down because I just retired. I look at this as a financial plus. i also have - I don't know how many of you have actually traveled to Pennsylvania and talked with some of the people down there. I have and the majority of the people down there will tell you that their biggest problem is how to manage their money. I don't want to make this an issue about money because I never wanted to be a rich man, I just wanted to pay my bills. I would like to say that I was reading a prescription bottle as I was coming in here tonight and on that prescription bottle, it lists as one of the side effects is death. But we take those drugs anyway because the benefits far outweigh the risks. I believe that we need to look at this cautiously but I don't think we avant to close the door on it. I think the future of Dryden may in fact depend on the fact that we have a rich resource that the Lord has given us and we arc to use it that way. Simon St. Laurent - 1'd like to thank the Board for hosting this conversation. There's been a lot of talk lately about confiscating property rights with a ban on gas drilling. That discussion seems to focus on one small sliver of property rights; the right to extract as much money as you can from a place at the expense of everything else. If hydrofracking is allowed in Dryden, there will be wholesale confiscation of property rights. Some of it will be formal through compulsory integration, in which the state can force citizens to hand over the mineral rights to 1'30e 8 of 28 TD 7 �o-1l DRAFT private, interests- If you oppose Eminent Domain for private benefit, you really should take a look at Camputsory integration- Spreading industrial wDrksitea throughout the town an d connecting them with barrages of heavy trucks is also going t� confiscate a lot of property rights. Air pollution from those trucks and the rest of the, equipment will make the countryside feel strangely urba n. And those are gust the pro blerns that are .1.00% certain to come with hydrofracking- The environmental risks are real and demonstrated regularly, It's a gaMble; one we all hope we win; but watching and waiting to see if Four wL:11 water is going to remain drinkable isn't exactly a corn fortable exercise of property rights, 1 ask the Soa:rd to pass the ban on gas drilling. it preserves far more property rights than it takes. Ernie Balch — i'lI be 100 in a little over taro weeks- ;Money is olle tiling. We definitely need money. 13ut also we need water- lf, I'm not saying it can't be done, but if this cleat of figaeldng destroys our water 90 we don't have it, well, we'll lose money, Janet Shay — l care, about this issue because there are serious implications for the world I live in, Even if the fracking process could proceed without any unexpected accidents and goes according to gas company expectations, l object to forcing a landscape, livelihood, and life - changing process on a large refion of Ne+u York State. 1 Object in the face of m.isle,adirxg contracts- 1 abject irL the face of numerous and contingiing reports across the country of harm to people, animals, water, roads, costly impacts an individuals, assets, and on eommuriities and their resources. F object in the face of our safety and well -being be n dependent on the promises of strict regulation in an era of one failure after another by our state and federal governments. I object in the face of promised strict regulation at a time when % e can no longer afford adequate supervision and when the government that is supposed to be there to protect us 1s highly subject to the powerful and moneyed interests of large acitap oral ons. I object in the face of a lack of long -te1Tn planriing in the form of an energy policy and in the face of only beginnit to scratch the surface of energy conservation. I object in the failure to recognize the concept of true costs and in the face of the worldwide, increasing demands for {water, along vnkh record breraking temperatures and drought in our own country. 1 object in the face of plans for exportation of the gas to foreign eountries as opposed to its use for solving our energy needs, In the face of all of these things, i fervently uvge the Town )hoard of Dryden to stand for protecting the people and precious resources of oak- town with a ban orn hydrofracki-ng, Marie Mcrae — it seems to me that there are many more reasons to ban hydrofracking than I could possibly list in a minute and many of them have been talked about here tonight. 1'd just like to say that I consider myself really fortunate to be able to be here and to bP, represented by you, the members of this board. I know that you come to this evening having made careful consideration of the issues and that you `11 sift through all the comments that eve make tonight before you cast your vote, Along 16th over 1600 o my petition - signing neighbors, 1 urge you io vote this zoning amendment in so that heavy industrial development c❑ntiuues to be held at bay in Diyden. Robin Trapper- Herbel — Accompanied by her son Dante Herbcl who is entering second grade at Cas savant Elementary School. This is diffirult for us because 1 know he,'s hearing tonight some very frightening things, probably for the BTst time, (un iii telligible). W e uprooted ourselves from Kansas to move here to Dryden. We enjoy swirnming in our pond, hiking on our land, pastures and forest. We moved here for the ri c1hness u] the arts and cultural attributes of this area; the strength that follows between living a rural life and living the qualiL'y of life that we seek, Our property has a lease- e purchased it with a lease that was taken out by the previous owner ore month before he gut the property on the marlcet. He made $10,000 for his 100 acres in advance rental payments, I'm afraid for the investment we've made. I Would not buy our beautiful, beautiful property right now until these issues are resolved given the risks of what we can lase. We have renovations that we have put on hold; renovations where we would have bought local materials, hired local contractors; we're putting those renovations on hold Page 9 of 28 ,•1.� TB 3 -20 -1k DRAFT until this issue is resolved. F urge you to move foru?ard in placing this ban on hydrefracking to set the example for the rest of our county =. Martha Ferger — This morning, The Ithaca Journal said that the statC and Governor Cuomo will soon launch au extens1VC marketing campail;n as past of a regional approach to rebuilding the state's economy. I think the Frst thing the Governor sham 1d d is come out strongly in favor of a statewide ban on the kind of (racking we're talking about tonight.' What ,Sane business person would want to invest in ark area fraught with all the dangers and environmental degradation that {ve see ahead of us if fracking is allowed, not to mention the higher taxes we will have to pair for expensive litigations that will be too little and too late. I thank all of you on the town board for the time and eITort you've put in to bringing Lhis proposal before us tonight. By voting to approve it, yro1a will be the ones, not the governor, who will keep this area healthy f ❑r business while protecting us from a] I the dangers that have accompanied (racking in other parts of the country. Thank your j'be. Town Beard took a break from 8:0 — 8'o6. Nancy Miller � I'd like to talk in two directions and hopefully i can be really brief. I know I've said this before, lout there are siglificant. waterways that begin iii Dryden. Six i4lile Creek being one of them and nuyS right through my land. If there are significant spil19, and there will be accidents, if (racking and gas drilling comes to Dryden, then some of the significant waterways that run through Dryden can affect many other comrnuiiities besides ours, Six Mile Creek roils in to Ithaca and pro rides Tthaca %vith its water supply. Cascadilla, runs in to Ithaca and in to C:avu.ga Lake. Fall Creek comes from Dryden and runs over Ithaca Falls and in to Cayuga Lake, If there are significant contaminations of these waterways, we're talking about Cayuga Lake, we're talking about the Erie Canal and beyond possibly, in another direction, i would also like to talk about my neighbor who bas given her permisLion for me to speak, Terry'rhorrkas- Therc's been talk about land values decreasing, about people fearing that they won't be able to get the value out of their homes if they want to sell. Terry works for CorneLl and in two years, her job may end, She and ]Zar husband array want to relocate- At this point, a couple of wec ks ago, they put their house on the market for fear that if hydrefracking ca me to Dryden, that they {vould not be able to sell their house. In two days, they sold their house for the price that thev {;rzki -kb M and they still live 11ere but are renting- She said they'll be watching whether the bars is enacted hP,re in Dryden and whether it will be included in the new zoning laws when they are passed and that in two years, they may decide to stay in the area because they love it and rebui.Ld, but at this point, they'll be watching this issue very carefully. She asked roc to bring this message to thL board, Paula Peter — is from Ithaca., lived in the Colorado Rockies when oil shale came. in 18 months, wbele towns went up, roads went in, people moved in droves, the dime rate skyrocketed, and G worths later, Exxon pulled out because they found out that they couldn't make i L economically viable. What they slid was they up and left, They left whole towns that veers ghost towns- They Ieft entire infrastructures to rot, till the people they hired went with thern because none of them wcrc local- What we saw was incredible devastation. W e left the Ro Ode s and carne back to Tompkins Count- to raise our kids because we knew the quality of life here was so great. About G years ago, I built: my dream house on 10 V5 acres in Dryden- We lave it, A year after eve built it, a nice young marl came to our door and sold us a gas lease telling us what the process was - vertical yells, no problcrn, and all of your surrounding landowners have already signed a lease, so you might e]1, So we g1gncd a lease. Luckily we refused surface rights. At the time that the economy tanked and we bad a need to refinance, I went to my local financial institutiav inhere f had a 50 year relationship, and they were willing Lo refinance and all of a sudden balked because there was a gas Icase on the house. In the end, they did. because of the exceptions that I had written in to tha [case, but it was a close call- At that moment, we knew that this bousc, which was supposed to be our retirement, wag Z ❑t that investment, That, in fact, if the land across the street from us is drilled, we wiLL never sell this house, we will never get our money Palle 10 of 28 T9 7-20-11 URA FT out of it, even if the water is not contaminated and )Ape are downhill from it, To those of you V+D say, let': go for middle ground, I would say, yes, I understand that, This is an emotional issue, but it's also rational- It's my economic reality, and the reality is that in New York State, we do not have the resources to enforce; every the toughest rcgulatiaiis. The D1:C has been decimated. Febody is irnplementirlg what little we have in the way of regulations, Thank you, Dryden. Tonya Engel: — T've never been to a Dryden Town ineeting before- I'm somewliere between anxious and terrified. I agrea with speaker #1 and 2 who spoke very eloquently about emirontnental cunCQ�rins. I'm rlmt going to repeat them. T want to share, my own personal concerns; the things that keep me up at night. 1. I'm a biker. I do a ride for life every su mmer at the end of the year — that's 100 miles dram n Cayuga Lake. I train a lot on the bade roads of Dryden with a lot of other people. It's pretty clear that Tnydrofracking, with its manny trucks, is completely incompatible with biking. That would be a. real bummer for me. I work at home. A lot of people in Ellis Hollow work at home. They are our clay care providers, massage people, laeople who sort of works some[ where else but mostly have offices at home. When I looked at the map that showed what land near my home had been leased, I was shocked, harrified, etc., and the noise. Oh, my God., the noise. How swill I work? Haw will I sleep? 'Phis keeps me up at night even now it is clear to me that if hyd rofrackin g comes to my area, and i know I'm a worrier, I'm an anxious person, I'll have to sell my house, probably at a loss. Who would want to live there? This worries me greatly. Put-therraore, ! had planned to invest a signs ficant amount of money with a local company to come and install sular hat water on my house, which is quite well positioned for that, l put cuff the entire renovation because I do not know whether my house will be worth nearly what I paid for it- For all those reasons, 1 am in favor of a ban, but i would like Lhyden to consider in banning this, it is sort of turning up its nose at this form of energy extraction. I have to ask what can we all do here in Dryden, all of us, to make sure that we oursulves, our country, and our entire Taro rld, find a way to Ilse more palatable forms of energy, Linda Lavine — It's avery hot day out there tonight and I wanted to make it clear that we all are depending on our water supplies in this hot time and in this potendai drought- As the bumper sticker says, water is indeed life. Last tirne I became an 4nstant Biblical scholar at this raeeting by discovering the meaning of Hosea through Google, I was surprised to discover that kl;osea's words about reaping the whirlwind really spoke to me as if God was speaking through me. I've never quits had that feeling before. Ft �,ras inspired b listening to Bien❑ Schickel who asked us to trust the gas companies just as kIT. Szymanski asked us tonight to trust the gas companies- Make a few rules, set some limits, On the D vil, and make birn welcome in your house on good faith- But, if you reap the wind, you shall inherit the whirlwind. And 1 discovered that the next few lines were relevant. They say, 'Your coal will wither, your crops u?il1 fail," just as we've said that (racking may undo our water and our soil and put our animals and our crops at risk. It continues that the craps if they go to a stra nger, just as this gas is owned by people, our common friends like China, and indeed the gas may be liquefied and shipped to China, just as the prophesy suggested that the crops would go to a stranger if they grew- But mostly what Hosea yarns us of is that we cannot make a deal with the Devil and expect to conntrol the consequences, If e invite the wind, we w ll end up with t1,c whirlwind, The Devil doesn't have to respcet limits, even if he pretends to make a, deal. And there is n doubt ion my mind, and we should know this from %watching the gas companies through the past several years, that the behemoth gas cornpanics, owned by heartless corporations, are indeed our modern devil. An answer to mindless hoards whose only god is money. Bruno chickel and Henry Kramer have suggested that use Cain make a deal with this devil and we can hold him to it; set a few rules; expect to control the cons c qu cnees 6 invite him into our house, We cannot. He will have all the power and money to control our land and our lives and he will cheat and lie, Mr. Cayuga County expert on g€,s totally misrepresented the nature of existing wells in Cayuga Count} to us here tonight. He suggested that those existing wells were the same level of risk as hydrofracking, This big lie technique is the very devil and the same ones "'ey have used on many of us. I %vant to know, why would you lic? How could sorneore who is as informed as you must be, stand up here and suggest it is the same level of risk? Pna 1.1 aFIS TB 7 =10.13 DRAFT Peggy Walbridge One of the reasons i Iove living in IDryden is that it is beautiful, it is ru ral, I have a well. Everyone that I know of in that area has wells. As we all know, Time Wanlcr can't afford to send cable up et hill. There is no way we wilt. get water up a hill or sewer. I find it really important that 1 have clean water and clean air. I %re lived in urban arenn. It's not fun at all. 1 speak to you becaLlse you are both the first and the [ast defcnders for urn. Washington let the oil companies o u E of restrictions by the clean air and the cleat, inter act_ A]ba.ny doesn't think this area 1s very Emporta.nt, New York City watershed is very impurerult because they know all hell Tiuill break lose if they pollute i t. We aren't, and I wanted you to stand up for us and have tli is ban. I also think what's very importantt is that we need to be stewards of our land.. It is VCry irnportant For the caining generations_ Now is not the time. The technology is not ready in any' way for us to be tapping this. Let's do this for the coming generations; gramdcbildren, great- grandckii1drern_ Leave it in the ground and then in the future, maybe it can be tapped. But please vote far this ban. Rota Applegate - Fro a local well owner in Ellis 1-Io[low. ] just wa ni: to eriphasize a point that has corne up ]n a number of the different 2peeches this evening_ Often, the issue: is framed as economics vs_ the environment, ao that the economics is simply benefits against the benefits thai: the environment provides. 1 avant to b1ing out something that hasn't been brought out and that is the cost. This board working with other too ns in 'Compkins County is trying to do a cost benefit analysis. That is on the econornic side. It's, not just benefits, there are costs_ It's obviously much easier to calculate the number on the benefits, >_iut it's much more difficult to put a number on the cost. i applaud the effort to envision what frocking will look like in the county to that we see while same Businesses will benefit, other businesses will lose. While soiree property owners T gill benefit, others will Luse financially_ The importance of weighing the cost is something that 1-ve need to keep in mind irk looking at hour to evaluate }:ghat the benefits would mean. I {:'ant to applaud the town board in working with the other towns in bringing this about. l think until it's clear that the bellerlts outucigh the cost, that there should be no going fol�va.rd on a project like this, and I urge you to continue the work you're doing in trying to assess what those casts actually are. Evan Carpenter - Dryden is changing. This is a Tompkins County sails survey map. Thia picrurc is the view 1 used to have across from my front yard; Hart HiII Road and }what is n RMS Gravel Pit, There were nice strips of beautiful farm fields. It's not there anymore, it's now a gravel pit. It's an ugly pockmarked hale in the ground, 1 give George Junior Republic. and RAMS all the thanks in the world that they are there to have gravel for our roads, for our buildings, sand when I have a milk truck that's stuck in my driveway that [ need Eo get out. I don't like looking at it, but they have every right to use their property the way they see fit, 1 am nat about to tell, them they canpt do it, [ don't like looking at it. 1 don't like the changing view that Dryden bas, but it's what there is. lt'a what is out there. These that have gas leases feel as i:hosc this is the winning lottery ticket for them. I don't think so. but it sure would be nice to have a little bit of money. Maybe if 1 had a little bit of money, Dryden Agway would appreciate me Stopping in a little more often. NAPA Nvould appreciate me getting my bill paid, Pcte's 'fire would stop calling me be cause I'm behind to them_ Maybe 1 might even go buy al new pickup at the local car dealership. Wait a minute. Dryden doesn't have a local car dealership ru- y-more. We have vacant lots and empty store fronts. This is not just about economics. This is about pivpQrty rights, the changing face of Dryden, and what we wart Lt. to look like in the future. Do we want it to be open fields, viable farms that have the opportunicy to sell something that is below ground that will really not change the surface as much as a ,gravel pit? Dennis Mix - My brother and I and our wives own Mix Brothers Trucking and Excavation, I am as concerned as anyone that this all be done very safely. I dank want it dune unless it's dolle safely. A couple points T vrant to make - being self - employed, my brother and 1, this past year in 2010, with our 13 errsplayees, pretty rnuch ]gad no work in otiir business for 2 1r5 months, There was no [ayoff in our business. We paid our healdi insurance premiums in full and we pubs ]? of 29 773 7 -2(� -1 1 DRAFT pay ' /4 of our esnployees' premiums that have it with us, What I want to emphasize to you, l y doing this ban here, I don't think you have any idea the kind of consequences it can put on small businesses, Very few of the people here, 1 think, that are apposed to this, are self - employed, I'll take the discredit on that if I' wrong. To the cnsequence of totalLy banning it, I s think it is absolutely wrong, A Bruno chi m r} ckel has skid, it needs to be an in between, a middle ground, that needs to be done. Our health insurance premiums are about $12,000 a month. It only stands to get worse with this debacle that the Oba><xla administration is trying to force down everyone's throat. That's what really needs to be considered partially in this ban. As fax as the noise and so forth, I understand tl,-at, but for the most part, it's short term, Eric Liner —1'd like to think that I believe in capitalism and the free market and I definitely believe in property rights- I do think that one of the most com n r pellig reasons fa allo %+ling fracking is simply, you can'i tell me }chat I can or can't do on my land, But I also believe as many have stated tonight that that coaxes {with a big caveat. And that is, you can do what you want on your land as long as stays on your land and doesn't negatively impact or effect your neighbor's property, health, safety, quality of life, or finances. I'rn getting no reassurances from the draft sGFIS or the well documented experiences of citizens living with fracking in other gas towns that my home and my family won't. be subject to negative impacts as a result of drilling on lands adjacent to our property. I'II expand on my conccrrxs R bit. #1 Health concerns; I've significant concerns that there is nothing to guarantee that a well fracked within 500 feet of my drinking sapply won't risk contain inating my private well. Various types of well contamina tion have already been documented in other gas towns. I also have concerns abmit the negative health effer;ts caused by air pollution associated with the drilling process, #2 S ak. ty concerns: Aside from negatively impacting our quality of life, the anticipated explosion of truck traffic stands to turn our relatively safe and quiet road in to a place that I believe will be too dangerous for a child to walk or ride their bike. In addition, many of these trucks will be moving toxic chemicals and contaminated wastewater flow back that could be stored in close proximity to my home. #3 Quali�.y of Life: Put simply, if you brink lit Sots cf trucks, poison my water, pollute our air and/or compromise the safety of our environment with hazardous waste, yoU Stand to have a negative on my quality of life- 04 Finances; Like many members of the middle class, my single greatest investment is my home. If my water is ruined or my air quality is mined or my well dries up or we change our peaceful road And surroundings into a 24 hour hauling and drilling site, I'm threatened by losing my home's value and financial security- This would no doubt for me and many other Dryden residents be financial devastating. To the To��m Board, 1 understand the desire to bring economic growth and opportunity to Dryden, but I don't think it slaould be achieved on the backs of many of us who have too little to gain and too much to lose. To allow hydrofracking in a region as densely populated as Dryden iS, 1 believe, to gamble with the health, quality of IAP and financial security of too many residents. Until. the drilling companies can, without L9 doubt, dernom rate the ability to contain and lirnit thL hydrofracking threats to those propertics that choose to engage with them, I believe we should ban it. I don't balieve we're the equivalent of sparsely populated or desolate gas town in %TJy0mi11g or Texas. This decision will impact the lives of many, iF not all, residents, Having �,isited and worked in and spent time in gas times in Wyoming, the Gulf of Mexico and Alaska in the Anchorage basin on the North slope, I truly believe that once this monster is out of the bottler there won't be any putting it back. Charles Ge isler — I live .ju st down the road from the gas transfer station- I live across the road from the largest land owner in our neighborhood who 13as (cased his lane( and it will affect all of us, I've read the proposed amendment rather carefully, I support the ban and I want to thank you for the, considerable homework and thoughtfulness that has gone in to this, in particular the invalidity of permits in the town, point 5 under section 104, and F just quickly want to draw attention to it because it's extremely important that no permit that is issued by any local, state or federal agency will be recognized as valid in our town. I very much favor that. In fact, I would like to see us go farther, but I think your courage and foresight iR protecting the town is outstanding. I' Lgc 1,3 of 2 8 TB IM20 -1 t DRAF'r Bruno Schickel — First of all, I would like to say, I do own a fair amount of land in the Town of Dryden and i do not have a lease, I also recently went down to Bradford C ounty in the area ]u St below Owego arc] spent about three (3) hours driving around down there_ Contrary to what I'VE been hearing today about the industrialization, I actually drove 77 miles in Bradford County and I had a map. I knew inhere I vas going_ I was trying to locate the drill pacts, T had a map sbowing where the drill pads were_ I was looking for them and it was hard to find them, I located 8 different sites in 77 miles.-Quite honestly, after the driIIing was done — I saw a drill pad in operation? I saw some before they started, some after, and once they were clone, there were two small little 10' diameter, 20' high white little StloB, much smaller khan a silo around here that are 60'-8G' tall, Very, eery tow irnpact, I must say, I was surprised. [ think this gas ban as proposed is too extreme and I do think that you need to find some middle ground, 1 would give you an exarnple of why 1 think it's extreme_ it bans all forms of gas drilling- Not just hydrof'racking. The man talked about 300 {wells up in Cayuga County and somebody says, they're not fra rice d wells. That's right, they're not fraLcked wells, But. you�-c banning those type of wells in the Tov,n of Dryden as we 11, You don't nctd to, but you're choosing to, and I think it's regrettable_ T also Lhink that you could take another alternative- You could say we're not going to allow gas drilling in Certain zones. There are 120 parcels of land in this toxvti that are over 100 acres in size. There is an enot7nous amount of land in big chunks and we are fortunate of that because farming is still in existence in the Town of Dryden. You could say YOU have to have 100 acres or you have ro have 50 acres in order to put a drill pad in. These are rera.sonabh; things that could be put in place that is an alternative to where you're at right no %w. TVs finding the iriicldle groLind that could be sought if you chose to and 1 would encouragu you to choose to. I just offer one last sort of big picture thing and I think this goes to the Comprehensive Plan that we're dealing with now in the town and the zoning changes that we're dealing with ors other things going forward � 9ue all love the agricultural, farming landscape that farmers like Evan aa-penter have been supplying us with niece the early 180 Os; his family and Doug Barton's family, We lave this tour" and we love the }andscape that they are providing for us. I would ask you to think. about Lhis. For 40 years or more, agriculture has been declining. What is the result in the Town of Dryden? Fields are being abandoned, grown up in trees, back to forest. What does it mcaa? le'e'rs lesiing our views. Tremendous loss of vieuashed is being lost due to the abandonment of fields. The other thing is, farming is declining, farms are falling down, all this beautiful architecture i:hat Svc love, that signifies thin area to us, we're losing. This bas the opporwrii.ty that if the faa-mcrs were able to prosper a liffle bit, they would be able to kccp their ]and_ They would be ably to pass it on to the next generation. They would be able to be good stewards of it the way they have been for a couple hundred years, i %.vould strongly suggest that you consider adopting a more incremental approach. I would just say, farmers have had to sell off parcels of land to housiiyg. That's the other area of the lass. They have to peel off a couple acres here and there to make ends meet aJxd ultimately, 4kre're lasing this rUral nature that gRre hare, By alloruinF, them to benefit from this, it would be good. Graod for farmers will be good for Dryden_ Gideon Stone - Having D c�tened to everybody speak tonight, I have: a really hard d m e arguing with either side of the argument an the position s that eve tyone has taken_ The Ching that I would like to talk to you about is the one vein that kind of stretched through all of this, and that is the corporations that are involved in all of t11 is. It's impossible to take them out of the equation. They're there, they own our government, and they are nDt going to leave and there is nothing you can do about that. That is a reality {we have to face_ The way that 1 1 0 ok at this wlxale situation is that everybody's afraid of losing sornetbing, whether it's the environment ar your financial situation being harried, b1At when. it comes clown to it, to me, the potential of eirivironmental harm is going to far outweigh any economic gain that anybody will ever gain from this. 1 ecaLlse of this, we need to tape a stand and show the corporations ti at instead of looking for new ways to harvest gas, we need to chow them that we wan t: am stainable energy. That's what it comes down to- By casting this vote, and b @rtining frackitng, I tl-dnk vvF�'re casting a vote that is spealcing to the dOYpOJ. Lon23 ul tllai sense, Naga 14 ufIs TB 7 -2M I DRAFT ® Hilary Lambert - I have a well. I'm Fxecutive Director of the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network, so I'm focused on what this means for protection of our water resources. I'm very much grateful to the board for moving this ordinance forward and am looking forward to your voting it in. I want to remind you that a lot of people are watching because this is going to be an example for other towns, for other watersheds. There are water protection organizations nationally who are interested in what you are doing here in Dryden and are asking for copies of the ordinance so that they can share them with other communities. There is an organization, the Fingerlakes Regional Watershed Alliance, that is made up of representatives from 9 of the fingerlakes. They are very excited about what is happening here, in Ithaca, in Ulysses and potentially in other towns around here. Thank you very much. A lot of people are watching and depending on you. Peter Quinn - Jacobs - I'm 19 years old and I Live on a farm. I've traveled a lot both in this country and in other countries. 1 know that when I settle down, I want to settle down here. What happens with this bill will affect the rest of my life. Like some other people have said, hydrofracking is an obvious bad idea. There have been plenty of studies done and everyone can see, if they've taken the time to look, that the negatives far outweigh the positives. In a cost benefit analysis, the costs are going to far outweigh the benefits.,For me, for other people my age who are going to be inheriting this land that we're living on now, I want you to pass this bill banning hydrofracking. Charles Hatfield - I think very highly of the Town of Dryden. To have a complete ban on this fracking, down the road I feel this fracking is going to change and there are going to be improvements. The Town could benefit by gas in the future. To completely ban it, I'm against it. You've heard all the pros and cons from everybody else, but I'd like to see you leave room in there in the future for possible gas drilling. • Russ Beck - I'm a dairy farmer. We own a. lot of ground. We have zero leases on our ground. I'm not here to say we have to have money from gas leases to prosper and have a successful dairy business. I will be completely the opposite of that. Our dairy farm is third generation. We absolutely rely on clean water and treating the ground right. We cannot survive without that. I would not sign any lease that jeopardized our ground water. We have to have clean water. On the other hand, we work very closely with DEC through a KAFO ?? program permit and I can tell you that they are not an easy agency to deal with. Contrary to a lot of beliefs here that have no faith in our government whatsoever, I would disagree with that because I deal with them on a first hand basis and it's not always easy, but we do things right. The position the town is taking is not only banning hydrofracking, it is banning all gas exploration, which 1 don't understand for a moment. There's a lot of middle ground. Supervisor Sumner - Can 1 take a minute to explain that, because it keeps coming up? The DEC does not allow local governments to regulate the industry. We're not allowed to say this technique is ok, that technique's no good, you can drill this deep but no deeper. Until we are invited to the table to have a say in some of those things, our only option is to regulate land use. Since we have not yet identified a place where we believe this might be safe, our only option is to ban it completely in the town. Russ Beck - I still believe there is middle ground to be found and a tot of middle ground to be talked about and decided on. This type of decision, I think is an infringement on rights, and I understand all the water issues and I share those with you, but please be aware of what you're doing and the position you're putting a lot of land owners in that pay a lot of taxes, farms unfairly probably because our taxes are derived - it's not all about money - we have to have a good environment. I love the outside, I live the outside, but I do not agree with the position that you're taking. POgc 15 of 28 TR 7-210- 11 DRAFT Julie Van Erden - 1 am an environmental attornev and have extensive experience in the oil and ga s industry. J'm from the Town of Fabius, a town much like Dryden; farming area, ruraJ area, and I would just like W Say that i gave the very same speech to that town meeting, so I feel the same way where it's my backyard and the house that 1 own and my well, i would like to point out that INre been to many seminars. I have talked to many scientists. f hope that you wiII look fu rthec and do the research in to the water quality and quantjty issues, f have several articles here that T TwouTd like to give the board that speak to the dcpLh of ,water w. ells and then the depth of gas swells, which are Lhousands of feet below th.e.water table and why there is that impossibility of contaminating these water wells. Also, you hear scientists spear about any accident9 that Inave happened iii Pennsylvania or other states, and of course, accidents do happen. They will tell you those accidents are far less likely than a car arri der) t 1)11 the way home. Further, those states don't have the environmental regulations that New York is looking a#.. New Vork State aa1d the T) FC are dni.ng what they need to do to have uniform laws across the state, thereby protecting everyone equally, in a Linitorm manner, Also, those regulations, they took to reclamaLion as far as the land, the water, those things are addressed if you look at the DEC rtgulstiOnx that have been proposed. of course, this is not without risk, but DFa is cxtrcrnely strict, Anyone that has dealt with DEC on a regular basis knows that, and the regulations that they put is place. I wholeheartedly trust that they will take caru of this. Furthermore, 1 have written mates ials for the board, if you will accept them, discussing the board's legal authority as opposed to the state's legal authority on these issues. Kevin Mayer - I'm an artist, landscape painter, and part -time art teacher, 1 mare my living from the land as much as any farmer. You might have seer me along the road sornetim.e painting. The landscape and light and air is irnportant t om e. When i first heard about the iracl�ing issue about four years ago, T started educating myself. One of the people I learned a lot from Tams Dr. Theo Coburn who rugs an organiz.ardon out in Colorado called The Lndocrine Disruptor Exchange, He's a biochemist and he's documented a lot about the problems with the fracking industry, chemicals and so ford,- I've heard some great hangs hcrc thought, L want to say thanks to the board and tha111cs to everyone who is here in support of the ban. I'm appalled at the prospect of tracking in Da yden- I'm prepared Ea put my whole life savings down here to buy sonic land and a home to spend the rest of my life. I don't want to see it go down the drain, Pvc thought about moving to other places, but there'a nowhere to run. We need; t€x take a stand here, We need to be stewards- e ncrd to protect this land that we love- As far as trusting the government ,goes, Tyr. Coburn poirits out that the fracking industry is exempt from The Clean Water Act, The Clean Air Act, The National Environmental Policy Act, pretty much any Federal egulation }you caa� thi r nk of, and tbat's not by accident. I am lemming a copy for you of this CD — everything you need to know about natural gas drilling by Dr. Theo Coburn. Marty Hatch — IIre raised my family hcrc, I've been a farmer- (Unintelligible — asked to speak in to Lhe mic) We live in perilous times. our institutions of government have been severely compromised by large scale corpera #I ns and very rich people. We lino %v from The Daily News that people aren't 13oying their just due, whether it be corporations or rich people, send this has bccn getting extremely worse a.s tirne has passed since the time T first carne to Dryden 40 years ago, t❑ tha gres�nt, `These fatties arc being fought out in national circles and not successfully. Others have mentioned the large, out of state companies Wlno control the actrAties of drilling and really set the pace. Vicy're the ones cvho have ail the money. They have lots of money, Someone recently said in the national political scene that folks like us, and 1 mean all of us, even these who are in favor of not having a ban, have no lobbyists paying millions to national and state government officials to have their opportunities to livLc in the way that. they wish. Our town board is our immediate line of protection to our local erIVIronrnent and i commend the board for taking this matter as seriously as it has. I think we're not ready to chart a middle course because the forces that arc allied against us are quite strong and a middle course will just be an opportunity to tape away what it is that we value so much. I recommend that we pass this ban and that we continue to learn from all sources about the risks and the benefita- Pogo 16 of z8 Tf3 7-20-11 DRAFT Until those risks and benefits are thoroughly assessed and it comes out that the benefits outweigh the risks, we keep it going as strongly as we can. John Burger — I appreciate how much time people have been putting in to this. 1 keep shuffling my notes because as time goes by, there are so many things that have already been said. One thing I would like to point out is how when we sit here talking about how we want to use our land, we only want to use a rational approach and things like this, what's left out of that is looking in to the context and the history of gas, oil, coal, etc., exploitation, not only in our country but around the world. It's really appalling and shocking how companies have used any method at all to cast just enough doubt to say, we didn't do that. One example that occurred out in Wyoming — the EPA came and they were examining a pit and they were finding chemicals that were in the pit, that were 10' outside the pit, and they said to the towns people, yes, the chemicals in the pit are the same as the chemicals outside the pit, and they're 15' away, but we caution you in saying that they came from the pit. They didn't say they didn't come from the pit. They only said, we caution you, don't get emotional about this, there's no proof it came from the pit. That's one example. Now going to Pennsylvania, a little closer to home, a company released over 200 gallons of pure hydropheuric acid. It ran for a couple of days. The DEP down there fined them $15,000, which is probably about a 10t1 of a percent of what they (Lamberge ?) would make in a grpical day. The DEP Commissioner said we don't really know what they use this chemical for; basically it "Is everything in the ground. They don't like to let us know. Now we're talking about New York. We don't do things like that in New York. We have a DEC that's really on our side. I've been looking a little bit at this document. It's 1000 pages, a very deep document and it contains a lot of nice words, but when you start getting in to what they say they're going to actually do, it's not all that impressive anymore. One of the things they say they're gonna do is increase the vent pipes and have them go 30' in to the air instead of 20'. Chemicals will go up a little bit higher and come down a little farther away. That's not a great thing. Finishing up, I heard a gentleman speaking on a radio program. from a landowner's coalition saying New York State is not ready. He said there were other ways that maybe in the future we could get at this gas, but this is not the way now. Even people who are well informed landowners who want to see the best practices are saying that we're not ready for this. I hope we'll support and pass this ban. Lance Salisbury — Most people know me as an attorney but I also spent 4 '/B }rears in the drilling and gas production field. I thought my experiences might be useful to hear. Many people have done research and read about what they think is going to happen. Production of gas carries a lot of negative externalities with it. In terms of regulation, they are looking at putting a lot of regulations in place, but the reality is, in 4 '/2 years, I never saw a regulator at a drill site on a drill floor. You have regulations in place and when there's an accident they will show up and they try to mitigate and they try to apportion blame, but when you're actually drilling and producing, costs run by the hour and the imperative is what you can get down the hole. Get your drill string down the hole, get the well in place. Start producing or seal it off. Those are the costs. You get your bonuses and your raises based on your ability to bring things in under cost and when you're on the floor, they don't care how that's done. 'That's important to keep in mind when you talk about regulations, because when you're there in the field, they (companies) mean well, but when it comes down to cut bait or fish, it's important to get things done. Most of the people I know who are farmers mean well. They look at that money as an extra source. Many are small farmers who are trying to keep their farm productive and stable. My other half's family lost their farm. 1 know what that means to families to lose those farms. The reality is for a town like Dryden, these are the communities that suffer most of the negative externalities. It's not just the water and the drilling issues, but there are a lot of negative costs that come with drilling. There are a couple of different ways drilling can happen. You get the camps where people come in, they're here two or three we on their shifts and then they're back home in Oklahoma or Texas, and you need to understand in terms of jobs, most of those jobs come from out of state, particularly the good jobs. Drillers, tool pushers, those are highly technical jobs. They're not hiring someone's 19- year -old kid to become a driller. You gain that Page 17 of 28 TB 7 -70 -1 1 DRAFT through 15 -20 years experience. There may be, aver tune, a few jobs generated. And there may be some benefits to some businesses locally, but there are a lot of negative costs that cone %vid) the community in terms of increased needs for police, schools, etc. You need to look at all of those factors. Based on my experience, the more cautious and prudent approach is to put the ban in place, Once you start, you can't have a little drilling and try to stop, but you can g❑ back and revisit it. I think you're taking the more prudent and conservative approach in the direction you're going, Jennifer Savran Kelly - I wanE to start by saying I agree most with the g4mtleman who spalke a bout sustainable energy, Just to give the contexl: of where I'm coming from, I'm not rich, I pay a lot of taxes, T struggle with my family to pay nny bills and raise my 3 -year -old sots. t would not lease my land for hydroiracking. I understand that one of the arguments against the anti - fracking argument is that it's highly ernoLional ad what u 1 wold say is that tonight, in Lhi n s room, I'm seeing ernotion on both sides. I understand and fully endorse that stand, It is an emotional issue. There are people who have a lot to lose on both sides, I look at my son and l wEu-it him breathing clean air and drinking ctearr eater, i had prepared some scientific information about the dangers of fracking, but all of that has been mentioned, so 1 won't repeat it. 1 {want us to use all of this energy- to work together to fhad a way to fix a I I of the pr❑ble,ns, and I think hydroftackirtg will contribute to them, not fix thorn. We need to look at alternative, sustainable solutions for bo ❑sting this ecorwmy- I think by placing thin ban, we're not Closing any doors, wt are putent'ially opening many more that Tare haven't eve» considered, Dime Kimmick - I'm on a clairy farm split by route 38. NO one can tell me about traffic, No one can tell me about noise pollution. I'm going to be in the bare bast midnight because I'm here so late, The caws are probably crossing their legs, 1 (to believe my land, my right. I don't think anyone in this country should be able to take it away mainly because you have such a great population against what 1 would life to do with it. Rick Ryan- 1 plan on becoming at, orgaru.c farmer here in this town one day, T wanted In thank you for this oppar pity to speak, for considering this ban, for revi��ng any Democratic spirit to stand up for wbal: I believQ is right. For Dying my unburn children, my grandchildren, the opportanity to stand right h43rc in this same room and say that they are proud lifelong residents of the Town of Dryden, They want to thank you for keeping them safe. For being courageous enough to stand up to these large corporations and say no, you are not welcome here, e value the beauty and the quality of life way too much to allow drilling in our wwn. We want to Iivc: a more sustainable life that does not align with the values of gas companies. Dryden has been around here far hundreds of years and it will continue to thrive for hundreds more- With that being said, the responsibility Will MOVC from the Board U-P us residents; a responsibility to put our money where our menth is, to buy local, to live a more sustainable life, to live and invest its this beautiful town that we call home. The responsibility is on us. Lea Elleseff- I'm a Iacal ]and own ar. 1 moved here three years ago with my husband and five friends. We. bought Sand, We pooled our limited re sou rres - we're jusE out of college - we don't. have much, and use bought lb acres of land together to start an educational homestead for ourselves and the rLlral community. We're called The DACHA Project, One of the things we believe is that sustainabiLity education is for all. Not just for urban areas with a lot of money+ lilue Tthaca, but in the rural commanities as well, That's what our focus is on - sustainability-, eoonornic, environmental, and emotional, I've beard a lot of people here talk today about ke:cping emotions ❑at of this. I think they're wrong. I thinly this is an emotional issue. Emotions are super important in this case. One of the things use want to do here is help strerngthen ❑u, community through work5hnps that are free and education and just having a community space for people to come out and play. The other thing we want to do and have already started doing is starting businesses helping out the local economy and participating in various projects People already have- Lastly, we avant to raise families. I worry that if this happens bere, I won't get to do that. That my family and I will erfectively become on vironrrtental refugees. l don't want PUge IR 1jr2a rB 7 -2a> > DRAFT to that to happen because like somebody spoke before, there's nowhere to run, I want to take a stand here and protect our water, which is more important and more valuable than any money anybody's going to get. The other caveat I want to make is that people talk about how our economy needs it. This isn't a sustainable industry. This is a hit and run industry. It's going to leave us more devastated. Do we want new, creative ideas and new technologies or do we want to retreat back in to a hit and run industry? I don't want to live in an area like that and I won't be able to afford to live in an area like this if the water and the air is polluted. Thank you. I know what you're doing is really hard and we're here to support you as much as we can and I'm grateful for this opportunity. Mike Lane - I'm a county official but I'm only talking today on my personal opinion about things. I'm an attorney in Dryden. I've practiced for 35 years. I don't have any gas leases. I don't own any large tracts of land. In my practice, I have recommended to my clients over and over again not to sign gas leases and I continue to recommend that to people who ask me. When I was in Village government a number of years ago, there was a big controversy going about where we were going to build a Tompkins County landfill. The focus quickly became the Town of Dryden, to the exclusion of the rest of the Towns in Tompkins County. I remember being in Village Government at that time and being very angry to hear a comment from an important planning official in Tompkins County who said, West Dryden is made for landfills. Well, it wasn't. When I heard about the draft SGEIS from the state saying that we couldn't hydrofrack around Skaneateles Lake or in the Hudson Valley because that might damage those watersheds, I said what are we, chopped liver? My well water comes from the Village commercial yells and all my neighbors and the people in the Village of Freeville who have private wells, the people around us have private wells, they're just as important to be protected. I don't think the state is doing that. I think the last line of defense is this town. I think it's necessary that we protect our residents. Thank you. • Martha Robertson - As some people have said, this is what democracy looks like. I'm also a county legislator and talking from my own personal experience but also as a county official. We worried about the cost to local government. The great projections of how this industry was going to be so good for local taxes and local economies is not true when those reports from Broome County and University of Penn State only looked at the benefits and didn't look at the costs. Local counties in Pennsylvania are seeing their local costs related to drilling double every year for assessment, for law enforcement, for social services, for housing because people are forced out of their houses. The promises of jobs, they're not local jobs for the most part. In fact, in Pennsylvania, the industry - when they talk about jobs, what they really mean is hires. Every time somebody is hired, that's called a job, even if it's a day, a week, or a month. So if somebody is hired for a week and that's it and then they're hired next month for a week, that's called two jobs according to the industry. I want to thank you all for your courage and I want to tell you you're not alone. I saw a map today of towns across New York State where they are in the process of considering or have already passed a ban and you are absolutely not alone. There are towns all across NYS doing exactly what you're doing. I will say that NYS legislature has some possible legislative remedies in the works, in particular Barbara Lifton's legislation, It's possible if legislation comes through that really codifies and strengthens town's authority, a local ban might be modified later, but there is no such legislation now. As other people have said, you folks are the best protection that we have. I feel very strongly about farmers who are here. We need all of you. Thanks to Evan and Russ and the woman who left to milk her cows, what we need to do is fix the Milk Price Policy in Upstate New York, not sacrifice the land. What we need to do is invest in bio- fuels. 'There are many ways to make our land more productive in a sustainable way. When folks have talked about property rights, if what you're doing only affects you, that's great, and I respect and would fight for your right if it only affects you, but when every fracking event requires 1200 truck trips, then it affects everybody. You can't have a little bit of drilling. Even if it's as safe as possible, as somebody said, there are going to be accidents. A car crash is not the same as a frackwater truck crashing and spilling in to a • stream. Finally, for the young people who are here, this is so serious. Our future is at risk, prig= 19 of 28 IM 7 -2(r -1 1 DRAFT your future is at risk. This energy source is not even the cleaner fuel that the industry wants you to think it is. All you have to do is google Bob looiowarth at Cornell. He has done the study to show that Shale Gas is not only more polluting in terms of global warming than conventional gas, it's more polluting than coal and diesel fuel because you have to look at the methane that's released in the fracking process, which is 100 times more warming than carbon dioxide. So this is guaranteed to warm up the earth. This is not tine answer. There is no way to make it safe. There's no way to make it right. The only thing to (to is ban it and i hope you do that. Thank you, Bernie Cornelius - I own a lot of land here and 1 do have my land signed up only because somebody's gotta pay the taxes on it. I work closely with all of the gas drilling in Pennsylvania. I'm involved daily with the erosion control and there are inspectors. There might be an inspector for every 5 employees and I'm only on the top of the ground, I don't know about the bottom of the ground. I applaud you fellows for your time and your thoughts. There's been a lot of good points brought out here tonight that we need to consider. I'm not for it, I'm not against it, but I will tell you i employ 30 -35 men, plus I buy a lot of commodities from local people to keep our business going, which is thriving right now. I sometimes wonder how many of you people have been down there so that you know what you're talking about. I wonder whether we can afford to or can we afford not to. It makes a big difference. Bob Beck - I grew up on a local dairy farm. It's now run by my nephew Russ. I have some feeling about the economics of land use and farming and owning land. I don't own much land myself and of course I haven't leased my land. I feel strongly about the future of our town. I think that the hydrofracking issue is serious enough, the threats are serious enough, to say, for now, no. There are too many unknowns, too many dangers, too much threat to feet comfortable that it's a good thing for our community, for our land, for the people. Perhaps some time in the future, with new technology, it might be a good thing. For now, I applaud the board for looking at this seriously and moving fonvard with this ban because I think it's the right thing for the time. We need to think long term and think of our descendants who would like to live here in this beautiful community and we want to keep it beautiful as it is. I believe as many people have said before, there are other ways to make money to keep our community economically thriving and healthy. The short -term gain, if it is a gain at all, of hydrofracking is not the way to think for the long term benefit for all of us and our descendants. Will Parker - I'm against this whole fracking. I'd Like to see a ban. I'm very excited about the possibility of a ban for economic as well a.s environmental reasons. For one thing, we're dealing with multi - national companies. We're going to have a much bigger learning curve than they are. Their lawyers are going to be very well experienced and very well armed to take on anything we have. if it comes in to a court decision, it's going to be hard to find lawyers that can help us in dealing with it, because these people have experience with this. They've been all over the world. Our economy here is an agricultural economy. For us to survive, we have to be stewards of the land. We have to know how to live with the environment. If we break the laws, mother nature's laws take precedence. That right there is the thing. For us to survive economically, we have to be friends with it. We have to work with nature. This type of industry doesn't do that. It's not going to be feasible and compatible with existing economies. No one will want to buy Fingerlakes wines if they're aged with trade secrets. A brand new thing has come up - we're starting to get bear sightings around here. Friends of mine in Auburn have been told they have bears now because of hydrofracking going on - they're coming up from Pennsylvania. If anything, a bear is going to know what's a good environment. Supervisor Sumner - I want to try and clarify one thing. I've heard a lot of people make comments about the Syracuse and New fork City watersheds. I'm not going to defend this decision in any way, but I can explain it. The reason they are exempted from the process is because they have Cederal permits for filtration avoidance. They have gone to great lengths over a long, long time to demonstrate that their water is so clean that they don't have to filter it. Pup 20 of 28 rB 7 -20 -11 DRAFor They do not have the infrastructure in place to filter it should anything contaminate their water. It's a Federal determination. DEC may not be any crazier about it than we are for all 1 know, but they simply don't have the ability to treat the water if it's contaminated. I'm sure there will be further studies on this topic. Jack Ruckheim - I'm a town resident and a manager at Bolton Point. BP gets their water from Cayuga Lake, which receives its flow from 3 tributaries that were mentioned earlier that flow through the Town of Dryden. BP serves some 30,000 people. 1 don't think it's a good idea to be putting those 3 tributaries in the lake at risk. The Town of Dryden also has residents who are Bolton Point customers. I think these are all things to consider when you are considering this legislation. Jean Cotterill - I do have a gas lease on my property. I would probably do a ga.s lease if they didn't pay me a penny. I firmly believe that as a nation we need to be more self- sufficient instead of relying on other countries for our gas and oils. I do have natural gas corning in to my house. It's a nice, clean energy. I think a total ban on drilling is the wrong thing to do. There are gas wells spread throughout your town that you could go and you wouldn't even know that they were there. The cleanup at these sites is excellent. 1 will say that I worked at Environmental Conservation for 38 years in the Division of Environmental Permits. I did not work in the oil and gas industry. Those permits are not issued out of the Cortland office, but I did reviews for wetlands and streams. i know many of the employees that work in the air, water, oil and gas. They are very conscientious. I'd like to believe that 1 was a very conscientious employee. The people that I worked with are professionals. They are there for the same purposes that you are. They're there to save our environment, to not pollute the streams. They're going to do everything to the best of their ability to prevent that from happening. I don't know about fracking. I'm a little mixed on that. I'd like to believe we can do it responsibly. I know there arc no guarantees. There are no guarantees that your fuel oil truck's not going to drive down the road and spill in to the stream. Accidents can happen. I don't know if the risks are worth that, but I do believe in the DEC. I spent my life there. I think a total ban in the town is the wrong thing to do. Janelle King - It doesn't make sense to me to risk water. Water is life. Without that, we won't be here. No money is worth that to me. You can't take money with you when you're not here anymore. I really believe that we need to take a stand against that here and now and ban it. Joe Osmeloski - I have a small 6 -acre farm where i have standard bred racehorses. I'm for the ban. The bottom line with me is that I've been approached about selling my land. Each tame, I asked if they could guarantee that my stream and my well won't be contaminated. He said, it's never happened, no problem. That's not a guarantee. Would I like the money? Of course I'd like the money. It's tough for me to get up here. I'm against drilling. The bottom line is, if anything ever happened to my water, I'm done. Mary Warfield - i've listened very carefully and want to thank you for considering this entire situation. I went to a meeting a couple weeks ago where there was an earthquake specialist who spoke about the number of seismic situations in Pennsylvania. They had over 1880 earthquakes on a magnitude of S, 6 or better. People who live miles away from wells and drill pads still had homes that had significant damage from seismic activity. He was bringing up some issues regarding Lansing and the Cargill tunnels and the salt mines and things. That could still be a problem in our area. The second thing that I'm concerned about is the oversight ability of the DEC. We all react in the paper over the last year about the layoffs at the DEC. There were 3001400 people that were laid off that worked for the DEC. With the layoffs and the budget cuts, I'm wondering how they're going to regulate and keep control of any kind of drilling that's taking place in Dryden, Tompkins County, or New York (State) for that reason. The other thing is, as Martha mentioned, there are going to be 1200 truck trips per well. This organization that did an overlay several weeks ago pointed out that there are scheduled to be Page 21 of 28 T$ 7 -20.11 DRAFT over 400 wells drilled in Groton and over 400 drilled in Dryden. Can you imagine the truck traffic if you multiply over 800 wells times 1.200 truck trips? I don't think our infrastructure can handle this. As that 1.00 year old, dear, sweet individual said, money is one thing, water's another, what happens when we lose our water? Jason Dickinson - I wanted to say that environmental concerns develop slowly over time. 1 have a house that's painted with lead paint over asbestos siding. For years and years, we did tons of construction with these things that cause lung cancer. My children are not poisoned. There are some very serious health concerns, however, that developed over a long period of time. Tn 1960, the Sovict Union was looking at their nuclear material and they decided to throw it deep in the ocean. It's miles underwater, it's 32 degrees, miles of darkness, nobody will never live down there. They decided against it, and not because the Soviets were great stewards. They decided that once it was down there, it could never come up and if you put this poison, and hydrofracking is a poison too, but if you put it down 1000 feet, itT be down there and it won't be able to come up. Deborah McMillan - I'm against it. My husband grew up in an oil town in Pennsylvania. We went back for a funeral. That's a place with no overhead. Those oil refineries have been there fora long time. When they come in with hydrofracking, they got: a lot of overhead they have to clear before anybody sees any profit. We could drive through Pennsylvania and see those oil wells are pumping in those farmers' fields and they've been there a long time. There is no overhead. It's pure profit. "There aren't any rich farmers there. None. All the people our age, 60, are dying. They're all dying. This isn't the gas that you breathe, this is stuff that goes right through the pipes. There is a refinery there. When you go back, it gives you the chills, because not only do they hydrofrack, but they build the things that clean it in factories. One of those, I understand, is slated for Central New York. No expertise, that's just the way it is. Drive through Warren, you can see it. Ken Schlather - One thing I haven't heard tonight, but I crime in a little bit late, so it may have been brought up at the beginning, but there's been some argument in favor of hydrofracking and gas drilling saying basically that we're consumers of enemy and therefore why shouldn't we be producing some as well. I don't' know if anybody's brought up the fact that we have the ability here to produce about 35% of our energy on an annual basis year in and year out, it's inexhaustible. It's called energy efficiency and energy conservation. In Tompkins County alone, it could produce about 320 jobs a. year over the next 10 years if we went and worked on broad scale energy efficiency here in the county. Every person who pays utility bills would save 35% on the utility bills. It's something that's democratic, it's fax reaching, everybody benefits from it, it's got long -term job growth, and in terms of the savings to the entire region, we're looking at $35 million a year. Rotated around back in the county produces another 350 jobs a year. So 760 jobs a year for the rest of our lives. It doesn't require water, it doesn't require huge amounts of truck traffic and it's relatively easy to tlo, Barbara Apella - There are so many reasons I'm against fracking that I don't have time to list them all. I'll just mention how it would affect me and my husband. 1 have an environmental illness and we had to move to Dryden. it took us 6 years for me to find a house 1 could live in without getting severely sick. Just the thought of that sanctuary that we've finally found getting threatened is just too overwhelming. The idea of having to sell the house and find another one is more than I can even consider dealing with. That's just one reason. Jan Burger - I have nothing to resay because it's all been said, but I'm starting to wonder if while people were talking you've been tallying up who is for the ban and who is against the ban, and I just wanted to be counted. 1 am for the ban. Tom Rishel - I have two homes. I think that causes me to have a unique perspective on this. One home is in Ellis Hollow acid the other home is in the nation of Qatar, which is the largest Page 22 of 28 TB 7 -20 -11 URA F'r producer of natural gas in the world. In fact, I would suspect that in the wintertime here, a fair portion of your natural gas comes from the nation of Qatar. It comes on ships. It's frozen and brought over. Over in Qatar, there is no such thing as a DEC, so there are no environmental regulations. The companies that go over there essentially have free reign to do what they want. 1 don't get a lot of the smell that some people get. The nation's about the size of the state of Connecticut and there are two main areas - one about 4.0 miles North of me and another about 10 miles South of me - where the natural gas is pumped out. Those places work continuously and, of course, the local people do not work except .in the highest positions. The people who do the work there are usually people from Sri Lanka or Pakistan, or they might be an American engineer. 'Arhat is going on over there essentially is a gigantic experiment. An experiment that's being played out on these people who come in from these countries where they cannot find jobs. They send all their money back home. Eventually they get sent back home. The people have no say over what the government is doing in terms of how the gas is extracted. You might say there is a similar experiment going on in Pennsylvania right now and in Wyoming, North Dakota, etc. What I would hate to see - I don't' know what the situation is where the water is concerned - I don't know what the situation is as far as the air is concerned - I don't know what the various chemicals are that are being used. Yes, benzene is being used.. I've written a paper on the question of the lead poisoning. I do n9t know whether lead is being used. I do not know which chemicals are being used. But I would hate to see an experiment used here in The United States, in particular, in this area right here in New York State. We have something that Pennsylvania does not have. We have the opportunity to say no to the fracking and 1 think we should do that, because we can get the kind of natural gas we need elsewhere and we can use other sources of energy. Over there, the situation as far as water is concerned, is not a major consideration. What they do is they take the natural gas, and with that, they use condensation to make distilled water, and they sell everyone distilled water. Imari Meader - In the mid 80s, I was living in Etna when the county was attempting to site a • landfill. At that point in time, Dryden was clearly the target. We had something on the order of 4 or 5 sites in our community. Several of us banded together in defense of our community even though we are perhaps not quite as elite as many of the surrounding communities, but we felt we had a way of life here to protect and we were concerned with the attitudes and the economics and the landfill in general. My experience in that process of three years of going to weekly meetings and DEC meetings and an SCEIS and continually trying to work the process in a cogent and intelligent manner was a very instructive one and very inspiring as well. I would like to say that the fact that our county decided after 3 or 4 years of this exploration not to have a landfill in Dryden, that it was in part because of the grassroots effort that we all did. I think it was more for the reason that we stalled the process. In that time, the economics of a landfill in this community changed completely. As a result of that, we don't have a landfill in our community. And what we have instead is a superior level of recycling and reuse and programs that arc continuing to expand. I would bet that there's not a legislator that was involved in that process, regardless of the side that they were on, that they are not relieved that we don't have that landfill in our community now because I think it would have been an economic disaster. If not a disaster, at least a real burden on our community. There isn't the garbage that there used to be and we would ha<<e had to import garbage. I think it's of critical importance that we take our time and 1 appreciate so much the fact that our community is considering taking critical time, not just to assess the pros and cons currently, but to wait to see what unfolds in the future. Danielle Lemaire - I am a Chemist. When I first heard that there was a possibility of gas drilling around here, I was concerned about what was happening just around my house, and then I discovered a few days ago that 4 or 5 years ago they started drilling about 4 or 5 miles away from our house and the well of the house where I live and the well next door were contaminated. I don't know the details because my neighbor is in the process of moving away 0 and he couldn't provide much information about it, but what I want people to know is that you're not going to know that your well is contaminated until you suffer from the consequences Page 23 of 28 TB 7ft20 -11 DRAFT' of it, and most of the time it's gotten to be too late. The other thing that I want to correct what you said about the experiment, you are not going to know about the results of the experiment, because these people don't stay there. They are going to go back to Sri Lanka, pa.kistan, or wherever they came from and they are going to igmore what happened to these people. Are we to allow fracking? You hear about the health consequences of people who live on the land. What happened vrith the people who work in that field? i was told that they have special contracts, special doctors, and they are basically not allowed to say anything. Because they don't live in that community, they don't have relatives who could speak about their health problems and people eventually just leave the region and the people living in that region never know about the health problem that the workers in that field experience. The other thing that you have to know — when people tell you we need a source of energy, the gas that is extracted by this process is too expensive. They're not going to sell it here. When you say that the gas that we use here is coming from Qatar and we know that the gas that is going to be extracted here is going to be compressed and sold abroad, it's really proof that it's .just a matter of money. My point is, you have to be objective about it and you have to realize that their primary interest is in making money. Their primary interest now is in getting a foot on your property. The moment they can get access to your property, they have access to your property for eternity. , Graham Dobson — I would like to say I'm for the ban. I don't like that we have to do this. I would like if there was amore balanced approach, but unfortunately, with the gas company, we are unprotected under the clean air, the wager act, and things like that. I have a well and are they going to come and test it beforehand and test it while they're doing drilling? I don't think so. Is the Board then prepared to put in a water district for Etna, then Freeville, and so on? We talk about these costs being insurmountable for these communities. If these drillers want to come in, I would suggest that they put up a huge amount of money that if they contaminate anything, we could then afford to build that infi-a.structure. Supervisor Sumner — We all need to learn a lot. There is so much information. We have several good sustainability programs going on in Dryden. I wish we didn't have to spend quite so much time on this. I wish we could finish with the gas drilling so we could talk more about sustainability. Supervisor Sumner closed the public hearing at 10:05 p.m. There is a meeting scheduled for August 2n(J. at 7 p.m. on another matter. There might be enough time between then and now to review these comments and vote on it that night. The Board has 60 days from the time the public hearing is closed to vote on the matter. The Board recessed at 10:08 p.m. and resumed at 10:23 p.m, RESOLUTION #121 J201 1) — APPROVE MINUTES Supv Sumner offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: RESOLVED, that this Torn Board hereby approves the meeting minutes of June 8, and June 15, 2011, 2nd Cl Makar Roll Call Vote CI Stelick Supv Sumner C1 Makar C1 Leifer Yes Yes Yes Yes Park 24 of 28 TB 7 -20.11 DRAFT Highway Superintendent Jack Bush reported that there was a bid opening for the Sunset Nest and Sunset West Circle Culvert Replacement projects. A Sciarabba sent an email to Supv Sumner to bring the Board up to date. This was a structure we looked at back in 1997. We have gone out to bid to replace this structure. We put in the bid spec a possibility of an alternate which would be Sunset West Circle and Sunset Nest Road. They are both dead end streets. We can't do them both due to the cost involved. My recommendation to the board is that we just do the one structure this year. That would require the Board approving the Supervisor to sign the Notice of Award. This has been prepared by TG Nliller. Chicago Construction from Endicott was the low bidder at $98,300. There were 2 other bids. The other bids were for $174K and $243K. A Sciarabba spoke to Economy Paving, the next bidder, to ask about the discrepancy in the bids. They were taking in to account that they would have to drill vs, pound these posts that are going to be required to shore the bank in order to keep one lane open throughout the project since they're dead end streets. The budget requested was $120,000 with the idea that Town employees would be doing the job. That isn't possible now. The two employees with the knowledge to run this type of project aren't going to be available since one of them is now retiring and the other is going to be on vacation. J Bush and Attorney Perkins noted that there was a slight irregularity in the bid opening. The bids require a bond or certified check in the amount of 5% of the base of the bid to be submitted with the bid. Chicago Construction did not include their bid bond, although it was noted in the bid packet that they had obtained one. The other two bids did include their bid bond. It was requested and was delivered later that day. It was dated prior to the day of the bid opening, so they did have it - it was simply not included in the packet. M Perkins advised that while the board should be aware of this, it should not affect the awarding of the bids, • RESOLUTION #122 (2011) - AWARD BID FOR CULVERT REPLACEMENT Cl Stelick offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: RESOLVED, that this Town Board hereby awards the Sunset West culvert replacement contract to Chicago Construction, Inc., in the amount of $98,300. 2nd Cl Ailakar Roll Call Vote Cl Stelick Yes Supv Sumner Yes Cl Vlakar Yes Cl Leifer Yes RESOLUTION #123 (2011) - DRYDEN LAKE FESTIVAL PAYMENTS Supv Sumner offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: WHEREAS The Dryden Lake Festival Committee was granted $1,500 by the Tompkins County Tourism Board and; WHEREAS The Town of Dryden is the lh'ECIPIENT of the grant as defined in the AGREEMENT made by and between the COUNTY OF TOINIPKINS, a municipal corporation in the State of New York with offices at 125 East Court Street, Ithaca., NY 14850 and TOWN OF DRYDEN and; NBC 25 of 28 TB 7-20-11 DRAFT. WHEREAS the Town of Dryden has already received the $1,500 from the COUNTY for the purposes of executing the Dryden Lake Festival and; 0 WHEREAS the Dryden Lake Festival requires these funds released prior to the August G, 2011 for the purposes of payments to critical event services providers therefore; BE IT RESOLVED, that the Town of Dryden approves the pre - payment of vendors critical to the Dryden Lake Festival, not to exceed $1,500 Stclick 2nd Roll Call Vote Cl Stclick Yes Supv Sumner Yes Cl i sTakar Yes Cl Leifer Yes RESOLUTION 0124 (2011) — APPOINT GIS TECHNICIAN Supv Sumner offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: WHEREAS, the Josh Bogdan is currently filling the position of GIS Technician on a conditional basis and; WHEREAS, he has taken the Civil Service test for this position and scored the top score during the exam; now, therefore, be it RESOLVED, that this Town Board appoints Josh Bogdan as GIS Technician on a permanent basis. Steliek 2nd 40 Roll Call Vote Cl Stclick Yes Supv Sumner Yes Cl Makar Yes Cl Leifer Yes COUNTY BRIEFING — Martha Robertson Ellis Hollow Road is getting done! Tompkins County staff is working on the budget. Many of them are finalizing their requests. Joe Mareana has started having meetings with them. There has been a lot of public discussion about the Cha Survey Home Health Agency and Office for the Aging. We're talking about moving them and moving the Justice Center out of the old library. The Office for the Aging is in the basement of the court house right now. It's taken a very long time to find a decent, affordable space. The Carpet Bizarre building has been purchased. On June 9th, the committee was asked for the final approval for the architects could finish the plans. We were asked to look one more time for a new location. There is a Brown Road location that opened up and could house Office for the Aging. The Justice center (Day Reporting, Family Treatment Court and Probation Drug Court) could all fit in the Carpet Bizarre building which is very close to the Social Services building which is where Probation is which would be excellent for that program. We could get out of the old library altogether, which we've also been trying to do for years. It could be used for sometli ng else or we could sell it. I'm supporting the move, we would save money by doing this. Page 26 of 28 TM 7 -20 -11 DRAFT There is a public meeting on July 25i11, Monday night, doors open at 6:30, panel starts at 7:00, to help ® people evaluate the new dGEIS at the Women's Community Building. COUNTY BRIEFING - Mike Lane Pat Pryor's broadband committee has new meetings scheduled - next July 25 @ 5:30 - Dr. Brown from ICSD will be talking about the educational value of having internet access for all students and other initiatives like that. The latest rendition of the Road Preservation Law will be at Government Operations Committee tomorrow. If it goes through committee, which I think it will, there will be a public hearing scheduled for the new local law. Some of the parameters have been changed so that projects with less than 1.000 truckloads weighing less than 30K pounds won't be affected. There will still be a permit required, but the law would specify whether or not a bond is needed by the project owner in case there is damage to the roads. CLARITY CONNECT TOWER PROJECT UPDATE Beam Hill and Bone Main got permits signed - Midline had a foundation issue but on their way. A 2°d hearing for Mt. Pleasant needs to be scheduled - that's a co- location. FINGER LAKES LAND TRUST CONTRACT FOR IRISH SETTLEMENT ROAD PROJECT Atty Perkins sent a agreement to Cl Makar. I-ie had some questions. Are there any promised improvements with respect to public access? This is a typical item and if there are any, they should be incorporated in to the agreement. Supv Sumner remembered a discussion regarding a parking area being provided instead of cash, but that seems to have dropped out of the discussion. Also, the 2011 budget doesn't have this included. The Board would have to do a public hearing and appropriate the money if we approve this in 2011. The Board asked Cl Makar to pursue . the matter. CONFIDENTIAL SECRETARY POSITION FILLED R Brown has been hired to fill the Confidential Secretary position. RECREATION DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCEMENT The first Movie in the Park at Montgomery Park is this Friday - Despicable Me will be shown, TOWN ATTORNEY - M Perkins Atty Perkins handed out Article 9 in its complete form. The changes discussed last week were made to 902A and 902B 16, 902H 1 & 2 and 909B. Questions are in regards to 903 Signs. The section has been reorganized to read more easily. Under Commercial (Light Industrial) the wording is Signs may be freestanding or placed on the exterior surface of the building." In the table, it refers to the fagade. Faegade is the front - was it intended to be the exterior of the building OR the fagade. The Board said this should be the exterior of the building. The following items Supv Sumner is going to follow up with the D Kwasnowski and get more information on what the Planning Board was thinking and bring that information back to the Town Board: Signs on windows are not permitted? f. Gasoline stations - Remarks - In addition, two advertising signs not to exceed 10 sq ft are allowed. Need to check if this is a total of 10' or 10' each. 5. For sale /lease signs - and /or OR and - go with and 7. c. Billboards - need to follow up on this one - this could be a constitutional issue D.2. Signs cannot be illuminated from within. bVhy would you want to restrict that? This had to do with down lighting and light pollution. D.1. Intermittent, rotating lighting ... Is this a restriction you want to keep as is or should it be • modified or eliminated? Pngc 27 of 28 T13 7w20-1 t DRAVC Su v Sumner would l' o i � is p ikc. t discuss the possibility of an administrative variance but on a smaller scale than proposed at the lost meeting. Still have Article X- PUID to discuss. Attorney Perkins and Planner Nicholson discussed the process and came up with a more streamlined process. The final draft of the definitions and Article X will be sent to D Kwasnowski for review and then sent to the Board. There being no further business, on motion made, seconded and unanimously carried, the meeting was adjourned at 1 1:1.0 p.m. Respectfully Submitted, Patricia Millard Deputy Town Cleric Cage 2 A (it' 243 • 0 Appendix I I — B Written comments received at the public hearing from: Szymanski, Ron Ferger, Martha Lavine, Buzz Kramer, Henry S. Berkey, Arthur Cipolla- Dennis, Deborah Norte, Clifford E. Cipolla- Dennis, Joanne VanErden, Julie Solomon, Joseph From Public Hearing i Date: July 20, 2011 List of Public Comments to the Dryden Town Board: 1. At the beginning of the process in 2010 to change the Town of Dryden Zoning Laws to meet the Comprehensive Plan objectives, the Town Board repeatedly stated that there was no deadline and all public comments and concerns would be addressed before new zoning laws would be established. Why is the zoning ordinance amendment to Article XXI (Miscellaneous) being considered separately for a vote tonight before all concerns by the public are addressed? Please explain the timing of the vote and urgency to the residents of Dryden. 2. Have all town board members read and studied the most recent DEC draft report released to the public on July 8, 2011 regarding high volume hydro fracking (HVHF)? Do you believe the information contained in this report is necessary to know before making a vote on the zoning amendment to prohibit drilling in the Town of Dryden? If not, why not? 3. The current report by the DEC finds high volume hydro fracking within the recommended regulations to be safe? Does the Dryden Town Board agree with this finding? If not, why not and please be specific and reference each point you dispute in the report? 4. When Governor Patterson was asked by the anti - drilling advocates in July 2008 to stop the DEC from issuing new natural gas drilling permits until a new study was completed, it took three years to release the current findings? Since little of this information is know by the Town Board and the town residents, would it be prudent and wise to avoid a vote on a new zoning law that has the potential of hurting our schools, businesses, farmers, landowners, local government and taxpayers? 5. The resolution of the zoning amendment prohibiting drilling in the Town of Dryden was first introduced and passed at a meeting on April 20, 2011. You are now considering a vote to adopt this law on July 20, 2011. Have you surveyed the farmers, schools, landowners, businesses, DEC, New York natural gas industry, and other interested parties on this law for their opinions before voting? Please share this information with the public or get it from your constituents before you vote. It is your duty as a representative body to fully consider all points of view. 6. Can you explain the Right of Capture to the residents of Dryden and how the zoning amendment to prohibit drilling is legally consistent with this law? 7. If you take the ability of the landowner in the Town of Dryden to drill for natural gas, how will the town compensate the landowner for the loss of their property? 8. If a property owner feels that the Town of Dryden through this zoning law has taken their property rights, do you recommend an Article 78 procedure to challenge the law? Or asked in another way, should the Dryden Town Board have an adversarial relationship with residents on this issue or find a less hostile approach to fairly resolve this matter? 9. What has the Dryden Town Board done in the way of community outreach to educate the residents of Dryden before taking a zoning amendment vote to prohibit natural gas drilling? 10.At the June 15, 2011 Dryden Town Board meeting to discuss the zoning amendment to prohibit natural gas drilling in the Town of Dryden, anti - drilling speakers during the public comment period-spoke in support of this law. No one from the schools in Dryden, businesses, farmers, or other local government officials spoke to support this action. What has the board done to bring consensus on this matter in the community before passing this very controversial law? 11.MIT recently released a multi disciplinary report of 178 pages presenting the importance of natural gas to the United States. Has anyone on the Dryden Town Board read this report? Does the Town of Dryden have a responsibility to understand the importance of the natural gas resource to our state, region and country? 12.If there is a legal challenge to the zoning amendment to prohibit natural gas drilling in the Town of Dryden, how much will it cost the taxpayers? 13.Will you explain the potential tax base loss to the taxpayers of the Town of Dryden if the zoning law prohibiting natural gas drilling is passed? 14.It has been estimated that one natural gas well represents 10 new teachers to the school district in increased school tax revenue. We recently learned at the TCCOG presentation at the VFW on July 12, 2011 that 44 wells are possible. Will the prohibition of natural gas drilling hurt the education of our children in the Dryden School District? Please explain how limiting the substantial tax base increase to the school district is desired. 15.1s the use of hydro fracked natural gas allowed in the Town of Dryden? Does the prohibition of natural gas drilling in the Town of Dryden create a conflict with the use of natural gas in the town? What do you recommend to replace natural gas? 16.1s the Pre - emption Doctrine in New York State giving the regulation of natural gas drilling to the DEC the current law in New York State? 17.Will the Dryden Town Board support the prohibition of natural gas drilling in New York State? If yes, what are the consequences to the residents of the town and the fourth largest user of natural gas in the US? 18.1s the Town of Dryden confiscating the mineral rights of the landowners in the Town of Dryden with the zoning law amendment prohibiting natural gas drilling? If not, please explain how a landowner or coalition of landowners could capture and market their natural gas product. Remarks by Martha Ferger. 7/20/2011 POB 8, Dryden This morning the Ithaca Journal said that the state (i.e. ; Governor Cuomo) will soon launch an "extensive marketing campaign" as part of a regional approach to rebuilding the state's economy. I think the first thing the Governor should do is come out strongly in favor of a state- wide ban on the kind of fracking we are talking about tonight. What sane business person would want to invest in an area fraught with all the dangers and environmental degradation we see ahead. of us here H tracking is allowed, not to mention the higher taxes we wi 11 have to pay for expensive mitigations that will be too little and too late? I thank all of you on the Town Board for the time and effort you have put into bringing this proposal before us tonight. By voting to approve it YOU are the ones, not the governor, who will. keep this area healthy for business while protecting us from all the dangers that have accompanied fracking in other areas of our country. Statement to Dryden Town Board, 7/20/11 Buzz Lavine buzz@baka.com I'm Buzz Lavine. As you've beard from me before, we're looking for protection from the Gas Industry Beast. And with every new government report, it looks more certain that the needed protection won't come from either the federal or state government. The gas industry plainly spends unmatchable sums of money on lobbying, campaign funds, propaganda, so- called scientific studies, and the like. They still assure us that gas drilling is perfectly safe, no problems! Then when the many problems keep occurring, they spend unmatchable sums of money denying those problems and buying non - disclosure agreements. I've heard some call the gas industry "the dirtiest, slimiest, most arrogant, and negligent that you can imagine." Not the kind of neighbors we want. In short, we don't want to dive in a proverbial company town, certainly not one run by that beast of an industry. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for keeping Dryden from becoming that kind of company town. I've written a few words to muse on this issue. 1 Frackina and Patience rt What's the. Ru By Buzj L vim If we (rack marcelIus formations and rash in with weak regulations} we'll wake tomorrow to disastrous implications. As it turns out, Even New York's fracking wlllr Lower property valuations and limit chances on mortgage applications We'll lose our property rights to condemnations and gain unexpected liabilities and obligations Fracking will increase our hospitalizations and also our future litigations It'll ruin our quality- ofdife reputations and our clean -water accreditation It'll also raise our property taxations and lose our kids to out migration It'll require costly reparations and burden future generations Perhaps worst of all, It'll cause neighborhood transformations with massive unregulated indutriafiations All these, and many other other degradations! These all are unneeded frustrations, unneeded trials and tribulations. Yes gas leases are attractive temptations, but let's he smart and have some patience. Let's riot join the league of "Company -Town Nations" Rather, the league of `° ommunitym Spirited Town Associations," Henry S. Kramer 1 524 Ellis Hollow Road Ithaca, NY 14850 (6O7) 275 -3653 onsultK ramel twcny,rr.cortt State rnent to the Dryden Town Board, ,July 20, 20111 1 spew to unjust confiscation of landowner's rights and clouding of tI tles on Dryden land by a ban. 1 do NOT, repeat do NOT, advocate unregulated development. Our environment must be protected, with narrowly tailored regulation, preferably uniform state wide, addressing specific problems. The census for Dryden shows ID,000 akdults. 5700 parcels of land have listed acreage. About 409�2 of these have leasable 2.5* acres. 41% of all land is already leased. Most residents either own homes or land or are part of a family that does. Lease offers in Central NY once $25 an acre and 12% royalties have grown to $3,000 per acre and 20% royatties. Already leased [and shares in higher value. !_ewes end and may be renegotiated at higher revels. A ban means for 1017 acres, at least $300,000 in wealth is wiped out. For 10 acres, $30,000 vanishes from its owner's pocket. A 100% #ax rata. How °s that far a local tax Mj5P Sound falr? If the Board votes a ban at $3,00D value an acre it votes to confiscate at least 5'175M dollars of Dryd en's wealth. That's tit kin the eg uivalent of the Town's total current tax levy until X074. A ban means turning our back on $ 17,500 per capita for every adult, 80,000 per parcel of land of 2.5 acres +. If each of these 2200 parcels has a 2.5 person household, 5v00 people direct[ y benefit, 42 % of Dryden°s total population, not a mere few. All of us will gain from money in our economy. A ban clouds titles of 41`Yq of [and. The courts In equity will extend looses so energy companies get the full lease period. With a ban, properties may carry liens forever --- real trouble for homeowners seliing or mortgaging. Compulsory integration is misunderstood. You don °t get the ioase fees but shale in royalties and are. never forced to allow drilling on your land. Energy development will help many hand working people who are land rich and cads poor or underemployed: It will recapitalize our farms. For Town government and educating our kids, safe development will raise new revenue. Given government "s fiscal crisis and tax cap, we must cut government services. Energy development could pay for schools and roads. Careful, safe energy development is passible, Consider all the facts, Look al: the Dryden ,safe Energy Coaliticn webs He at Drydunsec.org. Nothing is risk free, but the problems must be weighed together with the rewards aitd a middle course adopted. A total ban is a very bad Idea indeed. (PRESENTATON BY ARTHUR BERKEY TO DRYDEN TOWN BOARD ON BAN JULY 20, 2011 PUBLIC HEARING ON FRACKING BAN) GOOD EVENING, MY NAME IS ARTHUR BERKEY, I LIVE ON A TWO ACRE LOT AT 1205 ELLIS HOLLOW ROAD - - TOO SMALL FOR A GAS LEASE SO I HAVE NO DIRECT FINANCIAL STAKE IN A FRACKING BAN. I REQUEST YOU VOTE AGAINST INSTITUTION OF A BAN FOR THE THE FOLLOWING REASONS: 1. WHILE I SHARE THE CONCERN OF MAINTAINING A SAFE WATER SUPPLY , I HAVE BEEN UNABLE TO FIND ON THE WEB DOCUMENTATION OF POLUTION OF AN ACQUIFER DESPITE FRACKING BEING CONDUCTED FOR SOME 20 PLUS YEARS. I DID FIND AN INCIDENCE OF A SURFACE WATER SPILL INTO A STREAM, HOWEVER, NEW TECHNOLOGY OF USING METHANE RATHER THAN TOXIC LIQUIDS WOULD ELIMINATE RUN OFF AND ALSO ROAD DAMAGE FROM TRUCKS TRNSPORTING THE LIQUID FOR DISPOSAL NO OPERATION IS EVER 100 % RISK FREE AND THE EPA REGULATIONS ARE DESIGNED FOR RISK MANAGEMENT, 2. THERE APPEAR TO BE MAJOR LEGAL JUSIDICTIONAL QUESTIONS THAT PREDICTABLY WILL RESULT IN LEGAL ACTION BY GAS COMPANIES, LITIGATION COSTS TO THE COURT OF APPEALS ARE ESTIMATED AT $100,000 AND I DO NOT WISH TAX MONEY TO BE USED FOR THIS PURPOSE. THE TOWN OF ITHACA HAS ALREADY INCURRED THIS LITIGATION LIABILITY FOR RESIDENTS, 3. FINALLY, AND OF MOST IMPORTANCE, A BAN WOULD CONSTITUTE CONFICATION OF RESIDENT'S MINERAL RIGHTS WITHOUT COMPENSATION. FOR EXAMPLE, YESTERDAY AT A SENIOR LUNCHEON A RETIRED RESIDENT WITH 11. ACRES AND A SPOUSE DISABLED WITH ALS MENTIONED NEGOTIATING FOR A GAS LEASE FOR AROUND $25,000 PLUS 20 % ROYALTIES. A BAN WOULD UNFAIRLY ELIMINATE THIS INCOME, THE TC ASSESSOR'S OFFICE ESTIMATES 41 % OF ACREAGE IN THE TOWN OF DRYDEN IS UNDER LEASE. A BAN WOULD FREEZE LEASE AND ANY ROYALTY PAYMENTS TOTALING MILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN OUR TOWN ALONE NOT TO MENTION THE LOSS OF JOBS AND TAX REVENUE THAT WOULD BE GENERATED FROM SUCH INCOME. GAS PRODUCTION IS THE ONE ASSET WITH POTENTIAL TO PROVIDE THE BADLY NEEDED ECONOMIC STIMULUS FOR UPSTATE NEW YORK STATE AND SHOULD BE PURSUED UNDER STRICT ?REGULATIONS PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT. THANK YOU FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO SPEAK TO YOU THIS EVENING.. 20 July 2011 Town of Dryden Public Hearing on Banning Hydrofracking Deborah Cipolla- Dennis 964 West Dryden Road Freeville, NY 13068 You all have heard from me several times on this issue so I do notbelieve I need to go on about my opinions on hydrofracking or the dangers of this evil industry. I will simply say that I support this resolution and amendment and I am hopeful that you will move expeditiously to get It in place. In the remaining couple of moments that I have, I would like to express my sincere gratitude for everything thatyou have done with respect to this issue. You have come a tremendous distance in the pastyear. l feel thatyou have listened to the people, you have researched this complicated matter, and you have taken bold action to protectyour community. It is what we expect when we go to the polls in November. Even though we are often disappointed, with respect to our state and federal representatives, you have shown that we can trustyou to do the right thing at the local level. I look forward to continuing to work with you to ensure that our town remains protected through the upcoming zoning changes. Thank you again for all your efforts. To the Town of Dryden and its residents: I am addressing the proposed zoning/land use changes. It is my understanding that these proposals are being justified, at least in part, by a survey that was sent to town residents some time ago. On this survey some people indicated a wish to preserve open spaces. We live in a beautiful area and most of us do appreciate the rural nature of the town. klowever a survey does not get everyone's opinion and the results can be influenced by how the questions are asked. If the question had been worded for example, " what price are you willing to preserve open space "? The answers may have been very different. I also believe that many respondents who indicated they were in favor of preserving open space, don't own any. It is easy to tell someone else what to do with his or her property. Landowners in this area continue to be saddled with ever increasing regulations and expenses. This makes it difficult for individuals to keep land that is not producing income, or to produce income with the land that they own_. If you want to keep collecting some of the highest property taxes in the Nation, you need to allow landowners to derive some income from their property. We already have large amounts of land in the Town of Dryden owned by individuals or organizations that plan to keep the land undeveloped. I am not opposed to that. I believe the landowner has a right to decide how their land is used. The problem is, the owners of a great deal of this set aside land pay no property tax. This in turn increases the burden on the other landowners. The proposed land use map shows a large portion of the town being classified as Conservation District. I believe this will further erode the tax base and stifle development. I realize some town residents are opposed to any new development of any kind, but some one at some time built the house where they now live. When the gas gauge on their vehicle reads empty they want a gas station handy, when they hit a deer they want to find a body shop to repair the damage, when they need their drive way repaired they want products from a gravel mine. When winter comes they want energy products to heat their home, when they go to the store they want to find products on the shelf that were brought in by trucks. These same people are often the ones that want no new houses, gas stations, or body shops. They want to close existing operations that don't meet their strict "vision" for the town. They want to regulate and tax energy development and transportation out of the area. The proposed zoning takes away landowner's rights to use their property and offers no compensation. To take without compensation, is defined as stealing. 1 have a long history as responsible landowner and taxpayer. If the town or its residents do not trust me to continue to manage my property in the Town ofDryden, or believe that their "vision" for my land is better than my use of my own land, then it is time for them to buy it, not take it, from me. Respectfu I C Clifford E Norte Most good and worthy endeavors are accomplished in spite of, not because of, government. zv 20 July 2011 Joanne Cipolla- Dennls 964 West Dryden Road Freeville, NY 13068 I became a member of DRAC once I learned that the dream home we were building was surrounded by leased land. For more than 2 years we have been studying the entire process of methane gas development throughout America. Having just returned from another trip out west I was able to see several states affected by gas development. In Wyoming where my brother lives, the water is delivered to water buffalos because the energy corp's used clean water, contaminated it and now the corp's. control the water. The air is reported to be as toxic as L. A. This is happening in each state fracking shale gas takes place. It isn't if you get contamination, it's when and how bad. We learned that shale Eas production can only be accomplished with wide spread industrialization of entire regions. The tactics corporations use to convince a governor to allow drilling are well practiced and successful in many states now overrun by drillers. Industry convinces a governor" It's going to be done safely here ", "needed jobs will be abundant and that we need that gas to "end dependency on foreign oil. For starters we are talking about methane gas, not crude oil, the jobs will not be plentiful for New Yorkers but for people brought in from other states trained in the complex and dangerous activity of extracting methane gas, The jobs available for New Yorkers are for young men who are physically fit, need money, and are too young to know that these corporations use people up. Young guys don't askquestions about the chemicals they are exposed to. We have learned Fracking shale gas is a cause and effect practice. Water contamination is probable, air is laidened with Diesel fuel and hundreds of thousands of heavy vehicles fill the air with Benezene, a very dangerous known carcenigen is present at each site beginning immediately and it doesn't dissipate. This causes Ozone that occurs at ground level which is extremely harmful to humans and animals.. Benzene is a killer, causing lung cancer and leukemia. It is like smoking cigs with each and every breathe 24 hours a day. My sister lives in N Dakota where drilling has overtaken them, She cares for a young 7 year old boy who suffers from Lukemia , requires very extensive and expensive health care not paid for by the industry that created the Benzene he was exposed to, Her water is not drinkable. The locals have been forced out of their homes and rents have tripled to accommodate Influxes of rough necks. While visiting Dimock, Pa in March of 20081 got out of my car to take pictures. I was immediately subjected to toxic diesel fuel from a well site 500 yards away. A clear blue sky, a spring morning, and no one was walking their dog, riding a bike, or enjoying the spring break because every breath was as if I was smoking cigs. On that day I realized for sure, I wouldn't be able to finish our dream home we had started building as it became evident we will not able to breathe the air or enjoy the peace and quiet we moved here 5 years to experience In our retirement. Our half finished home on 33 acres will be a total loss if drilling is not banned. These are also the reasons why banks aren't lending for mortgages on or near leased property...it's 6 bad investment. So you have some property you want to build. on ... good luck,getting a mortgage...want to sell your home...the new owners will need cash to buy...that is if you can sell a home near leased land...word is out, just the possibility of gas production here has already affected sales. We came to the board on many occasions, asking you to learn, to go and see for yourselves, what Is like to take a peaceful rural, safe, clean environment and turn it into a gas development zone, so that you are able to make sound decisions about our community's future . I asked you to view the EPA hearing last May where the people of Wo Va. Ohio and Pa. spoke. Those 41/2 hours of testimony which 1200 attended, became a visceral experience and the faces of worry, fear, animated in anger while they slammed the EPA for abandoning them. That experience is not one I would like to ever repeat and it remains present with me today. some of those statements were to my cows are having blind and terrible disfigured calves, some are. stillborn, I can't farm my land ", Another man says, "This Is the worst decision I ever made,) Another stands at the mic, barely able to speak from his grief, "My 5 goats have all died, I am alone, they were my children" Another man tries to hold his tears back says, I was friends with my neighbor for over 50 years, I have ruined his life by signing a gas lease, we aren't friends anymore" . When one realizes the enormity, vast wealth and power the Industry uses to exploit people and shale gas, it Is truly frightening. Tonight It Is my hope that you will unanimously vote to ban high impact, heavy Industrial development like shale gas production and protect our Constitutional Rights, our water air and health, As the law ® stands a land owner who leases their land signs away their constitutional rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, unknowingly also sign away mine, the plan for property is irrelevant if my neighbor holds a lease, most people have no Idea that this Is true.. Horizontal (racking is the ability to take another's gas, even If they don't want to sell it, it gives the industry the right legally to explode shale under my land, take my gas, against my will, pay me a penance for which I have no say, contaminate my land, water and air and make It Impossible to live on the property. My land, through Compulsory Integration allows the industry to make me participate in the scheme I want no part of, that is Lin American. My neighbor is now partners with the Industry that seeks to destroy my American Dream, risk my health, safety and water, ruin my investment along with my plans . When voting to ban this industry you preserve our constitutional rights to life , liberty and the pursuit of happiness afforded all Americans. Landowners will soon realize you have saved them from themselves and from a notorious industry, that practices the same deception over and over from state to state for nearly 200 years. A landowner who leased now becomes the primary victim, taking on all the costs from losses by their neighbors. One would have to make several million dollars to cover the expenses of lawsuits brought by neighbors suffering from losses. It is the land ownerwho immediately begins losing, bears the brunt of land contamination, clean up costs, loss of water, health , home and property values. It's the landowners who is often sought in litigation rather than the Industry. Landowners must be prepared to learn deciding to allow drilling will costs them more than money. I have seen people and animals die, get sick and be quarantined, entire herds of cattle dying, Last Oct. I watched my little Beagle of 14 years die from cancer, We all say the same thing when a loved one has cancer,,,why? The process of extracting gas causes cancer, we can stop It from killing more innocent people and animals by not allowing it. A vote to • ban this activity is the only way to keep these experiences from being our realities of the future, We have the best minds at Cornell saying it's not safe, and not clean energy as its, touted but more damaging than coal production. If landowners don't listen to evidence, science and experience continually repeated to the public by Tony Ingraffea, Bob Howarth , Bill and Sandy Padulka or Sandra Steingraber(? ?spelling) what will they listen to? Those who say the industry can be regulated, policed and held accountable, do not know the history, practices and deception committed by the industry across this country. They don't know that the EPA cannot protect us. They don't understand that this industry is looking at NYS like a rapists looks at little girls. Landsman ,CEO's and industry associated public speakers are the pedophiles of industry, grooming New Yorkers, saying anything to get us to trust them, all the while knowing we will all suffer the consequences of methane development that will destroy our lives and steal our innocent dreams. They stoop to the lowest, have no feeling, are cold, calculating and relentless. They are well practiced in executing plays in the diabolical plan. For 3 years Pa residents have suffered numerous failures, explosions, deaths. Colossal catastrophes, like exposing 800,000 residents of Pittsburgh to fracking fluids containing high amounts of carcinogens, heavy metals and salt in their drinking water. The industries solution to pollution is delusion into rivers and streams. That is why we seek protection in zoning out this industry's practices. The forfeiting of a neighbors Constitutional Rights, subjecting the innocent to cancer by polluting the air with Benzene, clean water with chromium, radium and methane and depositing toxic fluids into the ground forever compromising a clean water wells. Landowners have yet to understand that if their land isn't suitable for drilling, les suitable for compressor stations, methane storage, chemical and • radioactive storage, refinement, deposits of hundreds of thousands of gallons of toxic and radioactive waste and ALL of these uses are NOT royalty based and no additional funds will be made for using leased land in any way the industry needs. It is also the Landowner and partner with the corporations are also susceptible to lawsuits for any and all failures, contamination, explosions, loss of Life, pioperty and livelihoods of their neighbors. If the wells don't produce enough money to cover these expenses the landowner losses again. Being for gas development is like saying it's fine to give ones wife cancer, children asthma, elderly parent breathing related illnesses. Signing a lease knowing the cause and effects of gas development is like saying It's ok to that your grandchildren will be born severely deformed, have learning disabilities, leukemia or any number of serious health Issues, Is it worth the money to watch your pets die before your eyes ? Some folks call themselves Christians yet they conveniently forget do unto others as you would have them do unto you and treat thy neighbor as thyself. If the damages could be kept solely on the property developed, was in compliance with local code, didn't risk our water, air and health and Investments in other strong economies do we honestly think we would be here right now.? If there are any vets in the room this is your call to action, the country is being destroyed by foreign corp fracking shale gas. Billionaires that care not for any of us or America will continue to reap billions each year by trapping landowners, lying to governors untouchable by rules, regulations and Laws. America is at war... right here at home, The terrorist are the energy corp who seek the gas by destroying the land, air and water, creating a vine of millions of highly explosive gas lines and storage facilities that are looked at as targets to topple America, All of these facts can be easily verified. The last point I want to r�i E, make 15 that despite the sickening propaganda that we rLeed the gas, 'the truth is The dept,. of Erie rgy states that America's storage of natural gas Is at Full capacity, the market pr[ce has fallen by more than half, and Americans are using less gas tha111 n prevlous years. That Is why this gas wlII be exported to countries vested in Chesapaeke energy, $P, Norse Energy and ToIisman, Frackinggas we don't need malkes no sense, a volatile fossil fuel should not be looked at as a viahle resource for revenue when It costs Americans s unfathomable damages. Amerlca will Fall iF shale gas development continues„ In New York we ask questions and say itiol despite the GaGernor Cuoino's decision to save only certain New Yorkers, you have the power to protect us. New York I5 THE state all the country Is wratrhing, We give hope' to citizens across the courrxry that the people can rule , The people of Ithaca have decided, The people of Pulterry carne Cagetherto tell ChEsapealceenergy > ielllotodumpingtoxicgasde� +elaprnr3twastethere,theygawe me hope and Insplration anti displayed a renewal of the Arnerlcan Spirit that birthed our nation " I come here tonight to ask you to vote your ronsclence, base your decision on fact, evidence and sclence It is painful to learn the truth, to know and understand the Industry's practices so disturbing and unbelievabIL people think it can't POSSihIV b u e true,. it's shocking to know the trth and terrifying to think we are next. Once you know you can't not know, our nation is but 235 years old and wil should be ashamed that we have allowed the corporations to rule at the expense of American ., bVe all must coins together learn the industry practices and make no mistake here, they come, they rule we suffer we leave,. and the corporatIon5 ;win a gal n, America slips Further away. It takes great courage. , Ieadershfp and pat ie,nce to delIv�er for the good of all of us. Each of you display these qualities , Taking oil the people's husiness is an act of selfless service which I am grateful to each of you and yo4i all have earned my respect and my vote no matter your party. Art with swift action and unanimously vote to ban high Impact, heaq Industrial activity Into our local zoning ordinance, effective imrnl�dlately to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all of us. The duty you have swam to uphold abode all else, P- OVERT M. S}lAFEFL AMANDA G. MAW M &r nkIEW R. Dti. zUMAN 1.0i11sins M, MiUR1,01' JANI! G_ KaPEkM ANN FpEL 1. RUSE ]1141E A- VAN LRDEDF KELLYM- COE'ASURD04 Dryden'rown Board 3 east rain Street Dryden, NY 13053 -9636 �ANNQ A7 {t#isY$ iR COUN$E1.OR5 AT LI% � X97 Rouke 281„ P O Bax 430, Tully, NY 13159 0430 (3l 5) G9b -8918 FAX (315) 696. 851 o-n«i! - jvbner�e riehl m�nshat nom 34 Cltorch S1rcc1, Oortland, N Y ! 3b45 Gr)7�.aoob FAX (607 )753-0183 rrmnil — r�slaxvrielrlmuirshefer,com July 20x 2011 rrIMOTRY G_ F IEHI MAN CHARI,Fs L, SHAPER p2� L'OUN6�L t.{ARY,a,lE fl . Also 110ellsed to Qrfotice is Ohio 16PLCUJC TCOV tD (•III!}' Qfi IGC 'Re; YC0�10'�t<C� 1�1OCf1[llSlElifS to Z(Iil1T1� 1�1Y11115411C�.9 2471{ �egulatlons to I""' Heavy Industry Dear Town Hoard Zembers: my office represents beck halms, LLB { "Beek laaxm " }, Fussell Dea�C�, member a�`�oc ]rarms,► s ed me to attend The Pebllc Tearing oil the above d refcrcnced as the see &fit } Asoac itizen of the ip his p *sition in. favor of land rners' rights to use their inn pacts tl c proposed zoning ordlna"'t Town of Dr}�dexi, i1+1r, Beck's position is that if the down v Indus ', ]pis constitutional rights w141 be iota �ltand, Please�acca�pt EhI andlor bftn on !tea y laws will be %violated M)d the Town e ,vill have referenced n hers. takinb o ]otter as written Wrnnlenl' to the ab e no #e ti7at according to Syracuse University lrtfesscrr, Donald eigei, who First, pleas xas e l Dratiou and its effect. on water, there is nothing to speciali7�es in studies relating to oil and i? water uality or quantity if o'tl f�id gas drilling eoines to t]lis area in foil 'orce+ fear as far as �l lei e1's urliculunt Vitae, atlaahed hereto, The gases telrials� will }travel below he please see r• g ti,e possibility that the ltydroraeks g tl}e water table, eliminating merits of environmental ►ter table. Please see the articles attached here 1�11b address die arm Iles that mangy+ of the ach of these irrt acts of oil and gas exploration. ou'Will see frontileritrue and unrifled. s e location are sarn ' horror stories told about oil and gas 1 re xlurnerous benefits too oil and gas exploration, Firt,nd foremast is the tax 1'hcre a aced taxes and better publio revcnitie that 'will come to I,:lle state of �1evr York. This decie Yel7L1�i iS likely to reSn t iri additional benefits to the citi oi�onaf ll betren�rthetr d by the need for truck drivers and the prograrrls. Farther, the local ee y increase in business -For local. hotels, landlords and store oiriers. ..:._ + ., , nfPrnFrksioritil Lkait d liability CoiuPiues gM14LIvtAN, T4AI. Eli & SHAFER addresseo naive July 20, 2011 page 2 It is the intent of 1�Ie fork State "I�] °') and the Dp Environmental �Tl�. Conservation ( "DECI that the laws rcguiatirig oil and gas exploration The Town does not bave the authority to invalidate state iss ble act vitics.l ordinance• The Town cannot utilize a Z,Qiling ordinance too restrict legally p New `fork State Environmental Conservation Laver, §23- 0303 (2), states that "The ro��isions of this icle shall supercede all local laws or ordinl own does no have the author y the ail, gal; and ,solution n�intng rndusCries... Therefore, the. to enact either of the proposed ordinances which will restrict oil and gas €frilling in the Town of Dryden, 1n �'riv���ga,�, Inc, v. aaralor�e, 447 I�Y2.d 22.1 (4`�` inept 198 ), the ro� ded that no Oil or actions of town officials in passing and enforcing a local ordinance that compliance bond gas well should be constructed in the town y ciaus tandcco Crary t o �a , sic E L Article 3 and a 25 permit fee were arbitrary, c.ap supexc,des and precludes the enforce7tient cF alJ loco Orden n� very similar to oil ordinance regulation," 'C'he proposed otdinance in the Town of y which was struck down b the Fourtl'J Departmci1t. The case law is clear that the Town does not have the authority to enact the proposed ordinances, Under New 'York State Law, a Town can limit land use, and to if roniote the �nterests�of the of police povrver to prevent damage to the rights of others p community as a whole. First, this is an unreasonable to t1�e ghts o oche s liven the the Town has no prom of any damage that wou State, after extensive investigation, has not pwvIded conciusloixs of damage to peoples° rigbts based on the rules and regulations peat in place by DEC. of the Secondly, this proposed linrtitat7on of land use doners' usepof ii stoncland is of in the community as a whole. lemly, a limitation on a tan landowners best interests. A landowner has the right J�s land as he sees fit. This is clear ail and gas exploration based constitutional law. Additionally, Town citizens will benefit on the economic benefits discussed above, ineionalg revenue t �Forltmany t local lusness iois. in jobs that v��ihl be created and the additional therefore, it is clear that limited land use in this manner does not promote the interests of the Community as a whole, I.t is we11 settled in New York that where regulatoty actions restrict the ability of a landowner to enjoy his property, it will be an unconstitutional taking requiring compensation. I the Matter o taride I�riedenburg, et al v. New Y6rk 4gtate Department o Erivironmental arrser tior , 3 A.1le 3d 2d Dept, 2003); e Sr �lubixi v. Flacke, 68 NLY,2d 66 (d Dept. Conservation, York torte landowners h��+c always had the right to use their land for oil and gas exploration, if the Town enacts this zoning ordinance, that right will be taken away from local land owners, resulting in a talchag of the land. RIEWNAN� SIIAF�ER , SI3AFIM �jddressce 1141TM JUIV 2D5 20] 1 Pagl� 3 If the Town Board decides to enact this local ordinance, there will likely be litigation se see the attached article in which Joseph Martens, omtnissioner Of against the "fawn, Plea DEC is quoted, stating that a Jude will have to decide whether ate outright ba�� on hyrdrofracking is a permissible Town action, riven the information provided t etalce the time to reserai�ih tln�csuatle further prior o previous presentations, I would urge you voting on this matter. "shank you, iz, advance, far takiug the Mne to careflully consider the arguments on both sides of this issue prior to making a decision. ei -, truly yours, r Julie A, Van Erden J AV Encl, k DONALD I. SIEGEL Department of Earth Sciences 204 Hemy Otology Laboratory Syracuse University Syracuse, NY 1,3244 -1070 USA Office: 31413eroy Geology Laboratory Phone: 315.4+43.3607 Department; 3154443,2672 Fax: 315.443.3363 Email: disie d@ .e[lu EDUCATION ilni CAT N Minnesota i�lydrogeclogy x,974 19811?h,D. Penn State University Gc�olag}►1969 -1971 M.S. Iniversity of Rhode Island Geology 19 65 19 69 13is. PRO FES510NAL RECOGNITION 2048 Lifetime Associate Member, The National Research council Science, The O.E. IdeinzerAward, Hydrogeology Division, Geological SocietyofAmerica, X005 Wasserstrom Graduate Mentoring Prize, Syracuse University, 2 0 D 3 Councilor of the Geulagical Society of America, 2002 "2 0 0 5 Distinguished Service Award, Hydrogeolugic Division, Geologic Society of Arnerlca, X001 Fellow, Geological 5ncieCy of America, elected 1995 Geological Society America, 1992 - 993 3irdsali Distinguished Lectureship in Hydrage olo gy, profess Dr of Earth Sciences, Syracuse Univ. 1962 resent; USGS Hydrologist, 197649BZ; Chairman, Hydrogeo I ogical DIvisinn, Geological Sa fety of America (GSA), 1 4 GSA Fell nw,1995; GSA Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer, 1992; GSA Distinguished Service Award, 2001; GgA Cqunc'[or 2002 -2005; GSA Meinzer Award,. 2005; esearch C i.ifo Time Associate Mernber ofthe National Rnuncil of the 9�atlonaiAcademy o�5cientes and Enpieering, 2008; GSA Book Editor, 2007 -2012; Syracuse University Was sertrum Award for Graduate Teaching and Merktorship, 2003; Research interest in contaminant hydrogeoiogy, paleohydrogeology, end wetland hydrology. 11 Y 1 r �• _ ®rm 4 tom. f J II �rIhJ i t,+ „ '1 S+ % ;r 5 r i rr J J r Ji 5'•” { "1 .c} } • c cwr� �+� L' 5 1 ifY,]r 1jiw 7r J r 11 + yls r1 'S'i1,1 y lrF* IiKw JI'. *T } F fill sjl +; ['{�I�Ic }mod y1 #y '' 4 t k J yY .� .ck G J%�� F�LttI,ill a s- . f tillyl �. 3i }. y41 j �� } * _t� h • r }, J �' rL 1c 1 r c `,r }a _!.; 13'#;� r - & i�r, 1 Y- S 4 1 1 '% rsl,ryl ,`'* 1 ' J•ry �,•1I, r.,"ra,_ '' _A45}J�'." x s syl'Lri T's'a Ip :. J.i h �F't r *. 11 wy \. t�ry1r -y } - �•• r *, G *it L, ,y� � k. Jy. % 4 XJI 1 -', .bLm C 11 it lrL r}f r'I.. /� f• 1. y /1[�ii, �1} •I.M+ '�F -•%�, { M.,: 'ir lfl�+IN r_.I .+c f c} + 5 }-y j k*�. err }f *�Jl yl rr,.r 41 rrrrY'lj R1{ 4'�LhS y`�f'f f�{'L;�r�.• ti i49") , � +3r } r7r {'J}'" •yJ�i.x #r -1 1 h�4{ X51., -t y }� J.i J 1 11 1 - r , k i 1L 5 , r , "'i t i ., 1 y .b .� - rl �y� }' I yl dl 5k L., i }` ,�.#{ ? }fl r fgI # r ,+ I 1f rt5. C 1. �hfri } }r :L k k+ a ^ c c } 3� •. ', ,:ri'u.+ ..r u ' ,1.. b•F I 'J It, _ 5.'51 iJl '• . ' I r ,x l , ^rl''I 7,i rl ,* fa 'i* r• {y� '' �' `rl }:' + {7 v,} r a,l'. e, r�r ,1/ ,+ JJ 1. f y #i Il,ri 61'j-4 rl. III 15� .4 JJ I tllYl I' IL •' .J, L IJ`r5} }�/fy,]yS} Ir k' "ri+ ' wI •'�"!f ,' WSf. 1. ''/'J i ] �4 • i l� ' , ''f, ' I f I pr ' Y- •1 4 : F* IN- ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ I ; ■ # ` "�\ I1 f �F I4 tY114 •� �S 1*+ ' r J•r l 5 ;Tr �ti�7 y'*' IN' '� } !' 1J * L9 IF 'kkk4 r. { I 1` 1 J ., f.a; h L �1i r, t4 I >J `,1 t'f „r 1 r I ;�L 1„ 1 1 f 1, J '. r „ w.. it . "1 1 Si, r' NO II, IN- +r, r .� I� d !r, ]'r 1 ] h , 55,♦ Jb Yii'.3• �' 1� r�+ 1 1y 1. il_.,1ry 4'ir _ #� _ pry �JYIL r1. ir', d ti '' M1 j} jLS,I'�y7J r£11 +q� 1 . s+ ,Jy fcy, rt, '• C F ,�,u rT 1til' rl ass 1 �rJ. 1 'r .i r S Ji 1 -I, 1. 'A f �" 1 i •'' " J�li I L Ali 0 It lb J ], Y 1 �y r ,,••�,��pp af- .•"�7'4In .l I J �r SELECTED PUBLICATION mmw� 11111111111111111 1111111111111111111111 11 111111111111111111111111 11 1 1, Chanton, J., Chascr,1.,, Glaser, P. and Slegel, D.I., 2004, Carbon and hydrogen fsotaplrefFectson microbial met lane from terrestrial ernvlronm �� `InD• Stable Isotopes: and los York, �►.85- 10I.here Interactions,Ed, Flanagan, L.B,, Ehleringer, ja and P , 2. Glaser, Nll,o D,I. S to gel, A.S. Reeve, j,A. I arissens, and D, R. Sanecky, 2004, Tectonic drivers for vegetation patterning and landscape evolution in tba Albany River region 0Fthe Hudson Flay Lowlands. journal of E❑ojngy, 92,1051070 3, Glaser, P.H., B.C.S, Hansen, li.l; Siegel, X& Reeve, Morn, F j.,2004, Rates, Pathways, and drivers Far geatland development in the Hudson Hay Lowlands, northern 0ntario.journal officelogyj 92.1436 -1450• 4. [;laser �, I3 ], P. Chant❑❑, P. Morin, D. O. Ras�nberiy, D. Siegel, G. Rau d, 1.. 1, Chas ar, A. S. Reeve. 2044, Surface deformaxinns as inateators of deep ebullition fluxes in a large northern pCatland, Global iageorhern, Cycles, B ,GB10G3,doi:10.1029f2003GBO0206 51 Otz, Martin [I„ E. Hirjrhey, D.1. Slegel, Heinz K, Ot7„ and 1.Ot7, 2004, Fluorescent dye- tracing as a Cos t - eflective tao3 in applied concamtnan� hydrology: Nac se G oundwnker Assoc atitan Hydrocarbon Meeting'avily u[1- contaminated aquifor, In Proceedings Cialtirnnre, MD , 45 -50, p 199 -209. Siegel, D.J. MclCenz[e, j,M, 2004, Coatarninatian In rang town; A Mock Trial and Site lnvestigatlan Exert [so. Journal of Geological F.durat{ons, vii. 52, p. 266-273, 7, Slegel, D,I„ 20 0 4, Lesn[alf�Fsolut #s Find KF sourcde ❑P aprhon d oxide�Gco�egy, �0�34 p � 6�2b�atoga springs; Irnplications for the origln�s 4.'Podorova, S.G., Siegel, U.I. and Castello, A.M., 2005) Mlcroblal Fe(I11) reduct]an in a minerutroPhlc ettlan {k- eochemicai controls and involvement in organic matter decomposition, Applied Geochemistry, vo1, 2O, 17.20 -1130, 9. Glaser, PH, D.[. Siegel, A.S. Reeve, and (.P. Chanton. 2006, The hydrology of large pest basins in NGirtl America, [n ]p eatlands : basin evolution and depository of records on global envfronmenxal and climatic changes Martini, l.P., Matlnez CortfzaE:, Ay and Cheswo i th, W. [eds j Elsevier, Amsterdam 1.0. Lauta, LK, DI Stegul, RL Bauer, 2006. Impact of Debris Dams nn Hyporheic lnteractlon Along a Semi -arid 5trearn. Hydrological Processes, 20[1;18349. 11. Last , L.K. and Iege1, D.1., 2006, Modeling Surface and Ground Water Mixing to the Hyporbeic 2nne ilsing MODFLOW and MT31), Advances in Hydrologic Sciences, p. 1618 -1.633 12, Laut& L_IG, Siegel, 0.1„ and Robert L. Dauer, 2006, Hygonccic Interaction A]ang a Second Order Semi -Arid Stream, Red Canyon Greek, Wyoming. Ilydro]agic Processes, P i33—lb. 13. Hrnbua•g, K.E. and Siegel, D1, 2006,'PhegeochemIF;" ofc❑nnected waterwRys, and the potential Far tracing Fish migrations, Nurtheastcrn Geology and Env[ronrnentaI SelenceS v. 29, p. 254 -265., 3 14. lcKenzie, J• Siegel, D.[., Voss, C„ Rnsanberry, Dm and G]as$r, P.Hy t]06, Fl eat transpore in the Iced Lake Bog, M[nnesota, Hydrologic Processes, Vol. 21, p 369 -378. 15, peeve, A.S„ EvensoFir R., Glaser, P,H., Siegel, D1. aad Rusenber y, D, 006. low P 1.3 -W1lI i01151l4. transicent g1,pund- {vater simulations 0 large peatland systems, 7.6. flosen>'erry, i}., Glaser, P,H. and Siegel, DEL 2006,1 [ow ]3iogenir Gas Affects The Hydrology of Northern Peatiands. Current DevelopMonts and Researocn Needs, Hydr ❑logic Prooessees, 20, p.36p1�36i0 17. Siegel, U.L and Glaser, P.H„ 2006,Me Hydrology of petlands, In: t3oreal Peatland Ecosystems, E�i. R. ](eirnan W led erand Dalo H, Vitt, Springer 9erlIrn Heldelb erg ,p. 289 -311 ],8. Siegel „D,E., P. H. Glaser, So, J. lanackc, DER., 2006,'I'1tie dynamtcbalanc�betwcen organic acids app! .[rcumneutral gimoundwarer iT[ a large boreal poathasin j ❑urnal lfydral , �+ y,+rol,3 0,' . 1- 43 In .9. Azzolinxt,fi.l4y Siegel, L].I „Brewer, J.0 Samson, 5.0., Otz, MrH- and 0rz. ]y 2047, Can tbin H G M Classifcation of Small Pion -!'eat Forming Wetlands Distinguish Wetlands From aurfaca Water Goochemistry, Wetlands, vol. 27, p. BB4-893, 20. Frey,1{,Fs., Slat;el, DLIP & Smith, L G 2007, Geochemistry of West Siberian swvarns and their potential response tit, permafrost dogradatIOn, Water Resources }lesearch 43, 03406, dot: xD29f 2U06WR0449022006 1 21.. 1, ��tc, L1{, Slego1, D,1., Bauer, R.K. 2007. Dye trading thr ❑ugh 5ir>�C (ni3yon; ineorporating advanced 23.j Lageofagy into tlse Universiky of 1�iissa+Lri,5 geo]Dgy Reld camp, Journa] of Geoscienca Education, 55(3): ct uF trans lent storage On nitrate uptake iengths in streams: an inter - 22. Lautz, L[ Siegel, D,i., 20 G7, Fle e efi'e slte co iparisoD.l'Iydrolaglcal Processes, 21[26];3533 -3548 23. McKenzie, J•, Voss, C•, Siegel, D.1.) Frovos%A „and Glaser. p. Ij„ SUTRA -1CL; 2007,A 3 -D Groundwater Heat - Transport Model with ice Freeze and Thaw, Advances in IIydrologlc Scicpces, In press. �4. 5idcford N1.p,,,Siegel , D.I.. Michael J. Mott! , Barb arn MI Hill , IonnIfor Show 0200 B, 5troritlum iSatnpic relations among pore Fluids, serpelitine matrlY and harxhurlte clads, South C1YaFnurro 5camount,Tariana fare arc, Chamlcal Gcalugy, Vol. 256, 243 2. Processes, 25. Siegel, D.1„ 2000, ll-eductionist Hydrogeology! The Ten fundamental Pr nciples, Hydrolo gi❑ }iydral. Yrpccss. 22, 49G7 —+1970 (20013). Z6. Cleant[sn, j. P., 1?, W. Glaser, L. S. Cl�asar, D. J, Hurdige, M, S. l�iines, Il. 1. Siogei, L. R. Tremblay, and . T. Cooper (2008 ), Radiocarbon evlde e5 of r ealpetlands, Global of geoc tm. Cyclesr22, G}3L4{}22 and rnetlyanngencsis in Contrasting L"fp - d0i:10,1029/200BGB003274. al Iskl pq o .Rep"nr:TJW miry 16 forydr LSGlL0.7m r$¢Ir veII 4N+ r+. 4r9014FiF4ioomlofi3rrrnadptoP0sia 0i61dLmtlSfl to Your Wlbo}yu&3.dm19 +u „llnp6Fr9rML •Ordorin ropdnLOitl- arWanvrr . Get 9 6n r4R1 _.� YlJ WARffWW rWW% Rr:VIC-APf k OUr1A01K I JUNE 25, 20 61 The Facts About Fracking '!'hs reaI risks of the shale gas reijo utivrL, crud how to'rnctr1age them. The U.S. is i n the midst of an energy revolution, and we don't mean so e� n unless iturbirkes, pal i n� usher of 1aaturol gas from shale i,as the potential to transform US, energy p greens and the industry roes9 it up, Only a d eL ado ego Texas nil engineers hit upon the idea of combining two establisb ad technologies to release natural gas trapped in slasle €ortnatfOns. Hpri7An#ul drilling —iri cvhicl� calls tnr+3 sideways aver a pertain dapthN--opens up big new p Nduction areas. Producers then use a 60.year -Iold technique called lrydraulic fractliring —in which water, sand and chemicals are injected into the well at high pcessure—to loosen the shale aT,d release gas (and increasingly, oil), The resulting bourn Is transforming America's energylandscaPe. As recently as X000, shale gms was �° of America`s gas supplies; today it is 425 . Prior to the shale breakthrough, U'S, natural gas reserves were in cleclirae, prices exceeded �5 Per million British thern3al units, and investors were building ports to import liquid natural gas. Today, proven reserves are the highest since 1971, prices have fallen close to $4 arLd ports are baing retrofitted for LNG exports, Tl� c shale boom iy also reviving economically su{fpring parts of the country, while offeanng La rLew incentive fur manufacturers to stay in the U.S. pennsylvaniWs Department of Labor and Industry estimates frackulg in the Mamellus shale formation, which stretches from upstate Ncw York through West Virginia, has.cxeated 72,000 jobs in the KeystDne State between kilo fourth quarter of 2009 and the first quarter of 20111 The Bakken formation, al ong the . fontana,,Noath D akOta border, is thou ght to hold fou r billion barrels of ail (the biggest pravcu estimate ou#5tide Alaska), and the drilling boom helps explain Noitb Dakota's unemployment rate of 3,2% p the nation's lowest, All 0f this growth has inevitably attracted critics, notably environmentalists and their allies. They've h auach ed a medi a and pulitical assault on hyolrR Olin fracturing, and their d aims are raising public anxiety. So it's s useful moment to separate truth from fiction in the main $Negations against the shale revolution, . mucking contaminaias drinking astir, one claim is that (racking creates crocks in rack formations that allow o}Lemicals to leach into of fresh water- The prL�blem w' 01 this argument is that the average whale formation is thousands of feet underground, while the average drinking well or aga�ifer is a few hundred feet deep, eparating th a two is solid rock. This geolagica] reality explains why EPA administrator Lisa Jackson, a determined enemy of fossil fuels, recently told Congress that there have b eon no nprwmn cases where the frackiii g Process Itself has affected water -° A second i�harge, based on a Duke University study, claims that Adfillittg learn from Mlrnmrd Ruri 011 ai a 2100 P1011 x f skuoi p!so during 5 fiaalcl¢no 0 n0kiral 905 we Ln Pleasank Vat18% Pennsylvsrniu In 2009. a frocking has polluted drinking water with methane gas' Methane is naturally occurring and isn't by itself harmful. in drinking water, though it can explode at high concentrations. Berke authors Rob Jackso n and Avner Vengvsh have written that their research shows "the average methane concentration to be 17 times higher in water wells located .within a. kilometer of active drilling sites," They fail ad to note that researcher's sampled a mere 68 welly acros.5 Pennsylvania and New Yor]€ —where more th" 20,400 water {yells are drilled annually, Tleey h ad no baseline data and ay f kwfg if , wigh t11114; no w ina h prior to drilling. TheY also a cknullbledged th at rnetha ne' was detected in 85 of the yells they tested, regardicss of drilling operfttions, andthat they'd found no trace of frocking fluids in a,ey wells, 'The Duke study dad spk7eli ght it lung -known an d Mora legitim ate concern: the passibility of 143EL cy well casing at the top of a drill ing site, from wlri rh methane ntiight migrate to water supplies f lug, and hey ajughtt o}b be attests, pro}ecr well eonstructlon and maintenance are TL' issues in oily type the focus of industry standards and attention. But tha risks lyre not ttiniqu o to fraClnng, which h as provided no urnusaal evidence of Contamination. fracture + 'rucicin re�euses toxic or rndiaarteve c.J'tern?eais.'i�ne reality is t13at 49LS% of tba fluid 3nlected kiit0 a ben ens. roi.k is water and sand, '191e chemicals range from the benign, such as eitric acrd (fnun d in soda pup }, States like Wyoming and Pennsylvania require cornpa�3ies to publicly discloso their chemicals, 'Texas recently passed a similar l aw, and other motes will fo ]'O;V. Drillers �n�Isk dispose of fTFLCking fluids, and environrnentaUsts charge that dispose! sites also endanger drinking water, or that d rulers deliberately discharge radlooac# ewes wa already have t� ct ra�sedesigned to keep fired the EPA to require that Pennsylvaulia test for rod tY waste water from groundwater, including 1'sners in y raste pits, and drillers are subject to stiff penalties for vioSations. Penns }'lean% . s tests showed radioactivity at or below normal levels. F �kiny causes Dancer. In Dis11,') Exas, Mayor Calvin V111nan c,iuscd a furor this year 11y ant]ou]rcini that he was quitting to move his sons away from "toxic' yascs —such as cane l%res sing benzene —from the town's 50 gas at tDX!n wells. State health ofliicials inuestit;at a ► apulat on ' I s dents vith �highe levels o €ben�enelin the! ere °similar to those ntea�ured in kilo geil hloodv�erc smokers. (Cigarette smoke cofriainsbcuzcne.j • Precking Cf]uSes en10thgiiakes. It is pmsible that the deep undergC nd n' O oroo fts to € sequester carbonarlse seisrnic actly, ty. $ut the same can be said of geotberm at energy exp p 1 dioxide undergi ouzid• GMn the 11b'quity of frackin4, with out seismic imp act, the rill q would seem to be remote. + Pullu [ion f7 om ta'klciCS. Drillers use ttmitcfrs to haul sand, cement an cts a d,eC nolm cdevelaprn in are €oii` states congestion itnrl pallut►on. WEB think the tradeoff between these effe and ioralities to judge, limeping in neirid that externalities decrease as drillers become mure efficient. .Shaieplo#icm is unrayulnted. $teSlronmentalisis claim fraCl4ing WAS "exempted" in 20U fraln the federal Safe Water DrinkingAek, tieanka to industry lobbying. In truth, all U, _ eompaxnics must abide byfederad water laws, and what tie a greens are really s ayir 8 is tb at fracking should b P, singled nut fur special and unprecedented A oversight. , Most drilling operatinns�in❑luding f M&ng� have lung b acn regulated by the states. Operators nCed pernr�its #a drill and are subject to inspections and reporting requirements. M.RTIy resvuTu&ric'h states like Texas have detailed fracking rules, while states newer to drilling are developing these regulations. As a regulatory model, consider Fennsylvania. Recently departed Governor Ed J�endall is a Daiinoerat, and as the shale b oom progressed he worked with industry and regulators to develop a flexible regulatory environment th at weld keep pace with a rapidly growing industry. As quest; on$ arose abort well casings, for instance, ponn�ylvania imposed new casing and performance regnirement.9r The ata#e has also inerCasel fees for p CoeessIng shale permits, which }tae alloyed it to Dire more inspectors and permitting staff. New York, by eontrast, has missed the shale play by imposing a moratorium on frack ng, The new state AU=ney GeDeral; Eric Schneiderman , recently sued the federal government to requtxe an extensive environmental review of the entire Delaware River Basin. MeanWb"e, the EPA is elbowing its way into the fracking debate, studying the impact on drinkingwatcr, anirnti7s and "environment al justtoc." Amid this political scrutiny, the indu stry will have to take great drilling care while batter making ita public case. It1 this age of saturation media, m singl c serious example ❑f water contamination could ;sad to a political panic thmt would jeopardize te��a of billions of dollars of investment, T'he industry needs to establish best practices and blow the whistl a on drillers that dodge the niles. The question for tb a rest of is is whether we are serious about domestic energy p-ra dAtction. All farms of energy have r9sk•; and environmental costs, nrnt least wind (noiso and dead birds and bats) and solar (vast axpansez of ]and). Yet renewables are nowhere close to supplying enough energy, even vrithlarge subsidies, to mairitmn America's standard cif living. The shale gas and oii boom is the result of 11S. btksinese innovation and risl�- taking. If we let the fear of undocumented pollution kill this boom, we will deserve our fate as a secon&ciass industrial 0 power. CopyiIroht M11 Dow Janos & Company, Inc, All Rthle Rasoryed Thls copy U far your persanal, narrcornmEadill use only. DIsirlbnNan nNd uga of this mmlorlol era gpvgrned by our $�btx rihor Agroo�nenl and by upyrilghl. lo . For "n•ryazsonol use or to order rnvlllpte WOOD, please GODU d Dow ,Janee Reprints el 1404 -MMOOa Or vlSlt www-djraprints.oDM 224 Stolp avenue syrwuse Nlew YoTk 13207 1,Urcb 24, 201 Q Skaneateles Juurnai PO BOX 550 Skareateies, NY 13152 0 To the Editor: i drinl Skaneateles Lake water and want it protected d ofickirione .however, l need to respond to Holland Gregg ,s negative essay on Y '[`he amount of llydrofrac� ing wafer sounds les Lake, IHydr&acking does not force plausible water resource, include Skaneateles water or gas thousands of feet deep upward t ugh r be allow d b}�IDF as a ith horizontal drilling. 1?iese� fuel will not co hydrofrack fluid additive, drofracking has caused no life- a}tering illness, i ancesaourrdal, water walls y to rim in gas and other suh chemically fingerp as well roblems. Out of the hundreds of see 1F they originate from near it g p thousands of gas and water wells that have bee farrninf ne growingphr dge failed, is airy industry Yield to aero i 3sk; boating, g aqy be the uildin + or tourism? Tile only issue of substance with cic F r � water. To put this into b g addition of salty water to the watershed from flow ba context, the amount of salt per well would lie, at a Max iYn�hed rhoad dur ng � ng ee co , amount of salt spread as deicer on one lane mile a Ovate winter, i n agree Mr. with r. Gregg t17at ctittizens use "cornirian think it is common sense ". i do make sense to ask far nonm biased information from l� �o01 f nancial i nvestrn ents. cornrnun decisions, be it on hyd ro Fra cki ng, medical advzc ' reponderanc 6 of verifiable sense also says decisions should be made on the p eviden ce not rare accidents, or r1 on- verifiable assertions, beliefs aSd fears- -even if passlonately held. Sincerely Fours, Donald 11. Siegel cF aitli cle Donald 1. Siegel is a Laura J_ and L, Douglas Meredith Prafessax nces at yracuse Ur iversityp ` EXPL09ATION & QEYELOPME T shale marcellus h. Er1LY, and the cansinan glacial period (70,000 to 7,040 years ago). These sedir�lents have a thickness rani�a�ry from ].00 co 300 ft. Typi- cally, the glacial deposits Wnsist of interbedded silt and clay alld occasiontg.), a medium Lo line sand, Wells drilled in the sand can yield water flows in excess of 200 gpm. Wells drilled in the silt or claY often yield less Ehan 2 gpm- Glaeial aquifer wells arc reeltaL ed by tinfil[ra6or, of ral' water and>�ov.rnel[. Soils in Lhe area have an' abundance of ilurnus alld. organic debris, and [he percolating }water has ample amiournic of dissolved soli& alld 6WArally occurrtn9 orgarLio compounds, 1-liigh ConcerLLntj017s of iron, lnarnganesa°, and nitrates, arP often Found in the water; nitraLcs usually come 1110m the breakdown of a r[culti)ral fertilizers and have historically been associated %vilh chTanic and sharL -term disease. Tire quality of the water is often poox, requiring �`iltratiuTl. In ad- dition, seasonal changes in Llie quality of Lhe water offers trut Arthur 1, Pyrun Pyron C{]rISUltng pdiStowl1, Pa. Che issue of iyJraulic fracturing as a development rnethad for shale gas reservoirs such as the mareellus has gore from an intmindustry discussion to a politically motivated issue devour in the media and in longovemmemmI orgailizaLions- T}oesf latLer groups have Formulatecl tlie api l uttro Fraci)i; destroys overlying freshwater aquifers by duc.Llrni of "poisons" into the aquifer. irr na area has this " disulssion" been more overly l)rnmol.ed by (ht media and overscrutinized by pn4iticiatts than in the Appalachian ba- sin, and specifically, Ln [he development of the >vi+iarcelb�s shale in Pennsylvania and New York, introduction ThE, discussion of the developnienr of 111c bTarcellus shale has gone from industry -based econolni is to citations aF leVL precedents aitd legislative irittiativts. As all of this in {orrrra- rion bas accrued Wh.Dl. has bean lost 1s t11e srienrx associated wir.h the Marcellus, and more importantly, Lhe interrelation ship the, ers Ntsrcellus deve1opinenr. alld graundwaCeT hy� dLrnlogy. In this anicic, the author will present some baalt concel }L5. INlien Europeans sFided the northeaSLern US, they fount a land than. was sirnllar La Lhe countries from which'tl,'!y rh Caere available andtih rhisbwa corssisLentewiLh vihaptlihey w previously knew, As a result, these new settlers develo ped their new homes in areas where ahuildan[ flesh water was available at. the sur- Fate (Le, rivers, str-eanis, lakes, and sprirlgs)- The nadve. peoples of Ll,is land also denrekyped their Cain- rnunities iu areas of surfaLle {reshvracer availabUity- These settlements grew i1110 larger Cornrnunii-les and cities prLlnar- ily because fresh water was easily obtained. CarnmurniLies without available surface water supplies had to rely on drilling wamT wells far their freshwater sup - ply. The process of drilling water wells i5 an art unto adj 0 m t norLheastkrtl and north central �ennsylv.`rlia and in adjacent Netw Ynric, these wells are drilhed in glacial sedi ments. bard rock ac{uifcrs are also present. in the region and are loLally signiCicar�t but not widespread, The size of the,£ opr[1rtl1niL7�s is often restricted because the $Irailability of Tres,1 water 15 limited, Glacial aquifers Glacial scdimen( covers I lost of New Yorl� and northern Pcimsylvonia; [1111 sedimnnc was deposrted during the is- 60 occlall e lilaMilton 'Fhe arcellt�s shale is tYle iov.rer member of t]s Group, an i ric�rbedded shale and siltstOle of Middle Deve ni- an agP. The Tully formation, all impermeable. limestone also of Middle, l)eVanian age, lies conformably r11Ja ;'e t><e Hamil ton. The C'nerry Valley, a limestone arid shale(?), lies below the artellus, The Upper 'Dp voiliarl, Lnterb(:ddcd siltswne .and shale, lies unc0nformabl -y above the ]jmoil[on Group The Lower Devonian lies uncouformably below the Cheiry Valley and consists of limestone, dolernite, @nd sandsnone, The Lower L0evorLiall probal)Ly T£presnts a marginal car bonate ramp environment; localized patch reefs Of mounds are found in Lhe Onondaga niembeT of the Lower Devonian - The Wdle and I3ppeeT Devonian repTesem a prograding del- ta environment, thicket[ nearer the d,rondacic5 and thlnm nine fartfser }vest - h rlali- ssir'Ve r and p nsylvantan rocks covered [he De- vonian rnelcs- l'Tosianal processes and gladatinn rerno }ed bath the lul.ississippiart and Pennsylvanian in MOSt of north- ern Pennsvivania and New York; die only exc ep[Lnn t this £xtrerne is r<orthw�'sLern PennsylvRnia and adjacent Nev of the rr,axirnurn extent of the WisCOn- York m6 areas south sinan �iaciation, In the areas of 1'cn775yt7ania and New York ir1 which Lhe llarnilLnn- btarcellus exists, it is aLcurate Lo say that. the lop of the formation is found between 1,040 alul 53000 It beneath the surface topography. The [op of {:he M�arcellus member can be Found at a depth of2,000 and 6,000 ([below L4 surface, The nominal 1400 ft plus of rock and sediment is.clucles the Tully lime, ibF lappet ok!vcnian, and younger C)p & Gjs frjr,iat l June 6r 2011 straLigraphic section, and glacial sediments and alluvillm- The -fully lime forms a njostly timpermeab1L "seal" above Lhe tlarnilton Group, there is little evidence v[ large -scale seepage of natural gas from t11e Hamilton Group, although Lhere is some rnicroseepage (and tats can be a cool useful in exploration) - litiere is no evidence of infiltration of surf;lte waters into the Hamilton Group, nor is there iniach copra- duued [orLnaticm water from Lhe I-Iarnilton Group, as the re- source is a Lhermogenic, or dry gas, marceffus horizontal duffing The Hain�lton (I arcellus) is a thraendime3tsinnnl horizon that lies at depths 'n excess C 1,OU0 ft below the surface, The aquifer horizon is isolated from Lhe iarcellus by lay- ers of mostly inrervious rack- I'he gas from the NamilrorL Group is thermogenic and contains little w no coproduccd water, lwfany t,perarors choose to drill ILnrizontal welk La PTO- ducu thF i-[amilton Marcelhns resource. 'This means that the horizontal compunenL of the well is drilled within the reser- voir rofilc at some predemrrnined deprh beneath the surface essentially parallel to the su `aeetrSe ell, man o erAlors miner drilling alld logging y p choose to use hydraulic frACtaring techniques to enhance production of the Well, This includes tine i»traduction of a water solution and sand under pressure to enhance the frac- turing of the reservoir rocl €. To the best of the author's knoivledge, no compaiky GC fering hydraulic fracturing servtce5 claims thaL its fractures pmpagnte more rhan 100 ft Erom the wellbure- Wells in whir =h the Hamilton NtaTrellus is found at depths of 1.1000 to 3,O(10 ft. are usually drilled vertically, The eco- nomics of drilling horizontal wells at this depth often isn't viab e- EXpIORATION & OEVEI.OPWIT Nines, loss of permits, and legal processes are the response rt[ governmenL to violations o[ these regulaLlorrs. Sprnetirnes, If discharge of drilling water to surface water is suspected, governments will is3ze pryer under clean water regulat.iorss. Industry heavily regulated An existing infrasil.ructure of periniuing, site inspeit'Cm and eELVirOnirleni a�mpliance is in Place to protect the env iron - mental. VlolaLiorrs of Lhese regulntions are discussed in the }�eraiitting process and during site inspec[ions- Violators of the regulations are dealt with by state and federal agenuies. The recent expansion of Marce[lus drilling irk Pennsyl- vanla and Ni!w York has bk-ou& an increase of claims of envlronmMal damage to atlrtifers from releases of produced water and drilling fluids, The author has shown that the subsurface geometry i11 the Narnilton (1•iiarceljw) precludes the upward movement (seepage) of natural gas rn produced water [rum the reser- voir Lo the oven} ing agUifer(s)- Tha only possible exception to this statement are operational problems, such as split c2,s- ing or bard uement jabs; since both of these ale harmful Lo operation of the well, the operator usually addresses them irnmediamly- 5urface water discharge should be prevetited by enforce - ment of the existing state and federal regulations, if tlarnage occurs to shallow Kroun6water aquifers, it is likely that it is caused by 'infiltration o[ naturally occurring compounds or Lhe makeup of Lyre aquifer itself- As permeability of the gla- cial sedirncnt4; decreases, infil[ritiOn of new water slows and water reravinIng in the aquifer has a tendency Lo get "stale.,' To blame deterioration a[ fresh water its aquiFers an the drilling o[ Marcellus wells is not scientifically Valid- It is a virxlattiarn of seiemiac reality, which involves the inte3 -prat& Lion Df date usini; the stiCntif-ic method- It 6 not an exercise in consensus buiCdirsg Or palitic -A correctness, and i-L is noL tavfr r�r en #nl c sfderatiorrs a tool t ad nee po!kticdl goals. The geologic fiac35 are the the n on7etry of a horixnrEtai well drilled in[o the m Flonrikon truth, if we care to illterpret the. (MarCellus) involves drilling the horizontal leg at a deprh of 41000 to 6,000 fL beneath the surface. Presuming optimum fracirkg of 10th It, the depth to Ljse upper CNC.ture5 is 3,900 to 5,901) fL beneath the surface and 3,600 Lo 5,600 It heneach the glacial [reshwater aquifers, Evers if one presumes that microfractures and oLha frac- tures tyre present in the overlying rank, the irripermuble ma- ture of the Tully limeswne acts as a "seal" and prevents most vertical migradon of natural gas From the 1-Iainikon Marcel - lus. Geologically, it i3 I ghly unlikely that t.huse gases could i3jLermirrgle with shallow groundvla[CT- -the. process of driltin9 n well, like almost every other I rnan Activity, involves an interaction between [Ile environ- ment and humAns- Th�e states of New York and l'enrrsylvnnial have enVir�nn- rnenr.al regulations, including waste warer discharge, that preclude rile discharge of produced water and frac fluids. off & Gas Jatrrna! I [arse b, 2011 The allthor AdhurJ. Pyron (pYr0Ac0flsulting0yahoa- c0rn) is sole propri- etor of Pyron Con, Lulling, Pottstown, Pa. Pyron has worW far Fortune 500 companies, small business, municipalities, and private indivldualis In a variety of projects. Pyron consulting is dndicated b providing short -tefm, project related technical V11 rrranagement support for clients with unique pr0*1 rlWds, �,iith -32 yurs of professional experience, Pyron Consulting has developed bath geological and busiress WerCise and has project management experlence ranging from Slte reviews to million - dollar drilling programs, Byron has an MS in W109Y from the University of Texas at El Pisa and has comPleted mo!e titian 15 hr of postgradualu short course work n advanced geological and economic topiCs- t.#1 Zd1)C#Nau flork(bi III Co RIP ill It' This copy is for your personal, nonoommerdal use only. You can order preson1atl0n ready coplrxs for distrlUullon to your 0011eo0ues, dienis or customers hero or use the 'Reprints" tool that appaere noxt to tiny orilcte. Vl511. www.nytraprints.ctan for samples and additional Information. Order a reprint of this article nrnv. ' G `UM �N April 150 2011 About M Y Support for Natural Gas By JOE NOCERA Oh, puh- leezel Some readers of The New York Times are unimpressed with the idea of substituting natural gas for imported oil, even though such a move would help wean the country from its dependence on OPEC. Or so it appears after 1 made that argument in my column on Tuesday, noting that natural gas is a fossil fuel we have in abundance and is cleaner than oil to boot. After that column was published, I was buried under an avalanche of angry e -mails and comments, most of them complaining that I had ignored the environmental dangers of drilling for bas, particularly the use of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, a technique-that involves shooting water and chemicals into shale formations deep underground. "No mention of the disastrous consequences of fracking ?" read one e-mail. Many readers pointed to a study by a Corner] scientist — reported in The Times the same day my column appeared — claiming that methane bas emissions posed a bigger thteat to the environment than dirty coal. Another reader called my column "a disgrace." Really? Let's take a closer look. To begin with, fracking is hardly new. In Texas and Oklahoma, it has been used for decades, with nobody complaining mu�d �yhex� a about environmental degradation. It must be a coincidence that these rimaril under natural gas 'field called the lViarcellus Shale was discovered � wouldn't rdn'lt obtjhect to having the Pennsylvania and New York. Surely, East Coast country use more natural gas just because it's going to be drilled in their own backyard instead of, say, downtown Fort Worth. Would they? As for Ilia actual environmental questions, there are three main ones. First, fracking supposedly allows gas.and dangerous chemicals to seep i torface frter g ply. T is is pretty implausible. Water tables aren,ll mock, Pal when methane appears to have leaked into the place well under. 7,000 feet. I 1 state environmental officials say that the problem was not fracicing but rather r s wateupp , sloppy gas Producers who didn't take proper me in cementilig their wells. The second problem is the disposal of the chemical waste. In the Southwest, produce's bury the waste in sealed containez's deep underground. The geology of the Marcellus Shale, however, makes -that much more difficult. Some of that waste is beiBg sent to existing undergrourtd waste dumps, leading to the possibility of spills. Dill ix''ducebr n heeled in shallower ground, which dates a fear of co- atamivatzou. Ultimate y, p iaTeellus Shale will have to da a better 3010 getting rid of the waste. Finally, tlik:re is the concern raised by Robert Howarth, the Cornell scientist, who says that natural gas is dirtier than coal. His main contention is that so much rnetharie is escaping from gas wells that it is creating an enormous Footprint of greenhouse gases. His study, caxactl iron -clad. Industry cfficaals have modked it, but even less- biased ho�vevex, i. not experts have poked holes in it. The environmental Defense Fund, for instance, has estimates of methane gas ernissiOns that are 75 percent lower than Howarth's. Nor is Howarth what you'd call an unbiased observer. Although he told me that he had "a ' strong reputation, which f value, for cl)ectivrty, '° he also acknowledged that he has testified about the hazards of fracking and sometimes wears a ° °no fzaclting" pin. Elie does so, he said, "because I'm a citizen of the world. ") 'l'lle truth is, eveimy problem associated with drilling for natural gas is solvable. The technology exists to prevent most methane from escaping, for instance. krong state regulation will help ensure environments y.safe wells. And so On Somewhat to my surprise, this view was ,seconded by Abrahm Lustgarten, a- -reporter for ProFul lira who has probably flae written T=ie stories about the dangers of fiaeldng than anyone. In a comment post d nl' to my Tuesday column, he wrote that white the environmental issues v�rere real, they c readily addressed by the employment of best drilling practices, technologLeal investment, and rigorous regulatory oversight." The country has been handed an incredible gift with the Mareellus Shale. With an estimated 500 trillion cubic feet of ml%serves, It widely believed to be the second- largest natural gas field ever discovered. Which means that those of you who live near this tremendous resource have two choices. You can play the Mot -in� y- Backyard card, employing environmental sea re tactics to fight attempts to drill for that gas. Or you can embrace the idea that Amenca needs the Marcellns Shale, accept the a in Convenience that the drilling will bring, but insist that it be done properly+ If you choose this latter path, you will be helping to move the country to a fuel that Ys � fires — cleaner. than oil, whikc diminishirig the strategic, importance cf the Middle Fast, where American soldiers continue to die. if S your Call. on the Plausibility that Development of Shale Gas Methane May compromise the Quality of Mew Yark's Drinking Water Presented to New York State Assembly committee on Environmental or�servation, May ��, 2091 D. 1. Siegel, Chairman Sweeney ancl Members of the Cornmfttee, thank you for allowing me the opportunity to present at this nearing. Let me briefly introduce myself_ I have done research on and taught water hydroiagy and water chemistry for almost 3g gears at Syracuse University. Prior to this, 1 served as a hydrologist and geochern ist for the United States Geological Survey. I have aiso served as editor for many professional journals on water science and on numerous National Research council {h1R ) panels dealing w ith water quality and quantity issues, During my career, 1 have published widely on many topics related directly or indirectly to the Nlarcellus Shale gas Issues. These include how the salty waters in the deep racks of New York carne to be, how to forensically identify different sources of methane and dissolved substances in water, the fate of hydrocarbon conts rn i n ati on in ground water, and how natural cements filled ancient fractures in the Marcellus Shale many millions of years ago. I attach a brief cv with rny statement, t' Departmenk of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University. Syracuse, New York 13244, disiegel@syr.edu 1 l fully understand that human error and past regulatory practice ir1 pennsy Iva nla have resulted in Iocall discharges of hydraulic fracturing fluids and salty fIowback water from Ma roe 11us d rill ing opera #ions, and that improparlyr cemented or constructed gas wells can lead to a release of natural gas to potable groundwater. Yet, despite these issues, even simple backwof -the envelope calculations show that few york's potable water cannot be seriously cornpromisec' by Marcellus shale gas development, To stark, the srnall energies released during hydrofracking cannot plausibly lead to fractures and deep fluids moving upwards through thousands of feet of alternating dry and Wet racy to shallow aquifers, What to do with flowback water remains the major issue we have to The laws of physics preclude this frorn happening. deal tivlth. A benchmark needs to be agreed upon to assess harm. Ma iMUM contaminant levels (M Ls) established by the NYDEC and EPA seem appropriate rw c our environmental regulatory pro ti cess has been keyed to them for decades; an sIj M Ls have been well vetted hydrofrackc ng argument, The chemicals in flowback water raising the most regulatory cencern so far are; and some organic compounds related to total dissolved solids, barium, strontium, radioactivity, bromide, as benzene), and those used In fracking (such as glycol), hydrocarbons (suCh Measured concentrations of these substances from often higher than drinking water standards, Marcellus flowback indeed are 2 Pit this hearing, you also heard of other chemicals at far lower concentrations, that might also constitute harm- -but no inforrna #ion on how much exposure would plausibly cause harm, or the fate and transport of these chem.l als in the environment once released. I have no issue with adding additional chemicals associated with hydrofracking to State M C L lasts - -so long a plausible harm can be demonstrated, even by analogy. it serves no purpose to invoice the precautionary principle without some demonstration of scientific plausibility of harm, invoking "anything is possible" as rationale for decisions onjy serves to obstruct the discussion or sow unnecessary fear, }end, suggestions that some chemicals are $e toxic that even concentrations too tiny} to measure or identify+ consti #+u#es harm not science, but agenda. should be rejected out of hand. This is So, what should the State do with the large volumes of floback water exceeding drinking water standards price Marcellus gas production begins? New 'York should consider fallowing Pennsylvania's lead, Flo back water in Pennsylvania now rnust be stripped of solutes to achleve drinking water standards before being released, stripped offsite for deep welt disposal, or be reused during dfilling and in subsequent hydraulic fracturing events. Except for minor spills, flo back water issues in Pennsylvania no longer are an issue. Flo back disposal should and can be a moot issue in New York too, What about local spills of flowback water that might contaminate shallow aquifers and surface waters? Many of the substances of concern in flo back waters K naturally occur in the Marcellus Shale and other rocks of Appalachia. Some flowback substances also come from other contaminant sources such as road salt, leaking underground storage tanks, deicing operations, and septic systems. The State needs to come up with a scientifically defensible suite of forensic geochemical tools to properly identify and distinguish among the different types of water contamination contributing identical constituents. These tools need to be part of the regulatory process. The State needs to distinguish between systemic environmental harm to waters and local harm caused by spills. They are different. Once flowback water no longer needs to be disposed of, systemic problems cannot occur - -only rare local pr oblems, I urge the legislature, governor, and NYDEC all to recognize there are no human endeavors with zero risk for local and rare human errors. But we can minimize risk and human errors, and with proper regulations, this can be done with the gas industry too. The fugitive gas that has occasionally contaminated shallow ground water moves through failed cement. The methane 'itself does not pose a health hazard except when concentrations become flammable. New York needs to work with industry to ensure a protocol that minimizes fugitive gas release more. Perhaps a longer time is needed for cement to harden before fracking begins. Perhaps additional geophysical tools need to be used to be sure no gaps in cement have occurred. This rare problem is a fixable problem — engineering. 0 In conclusion, I understand that there are social and philosophical concerns involved in Marcellus gas exploitation anti, that these concerns run deep. But, used on fundamental principles of chernistry, physics, and hydrology, our citizens need not also be concerned that their drinking water will contain harmful contaminants related to hydrauIic fracturing ° - unlass the State were completely derelict in its duty to establish a proper regulatory framework for the industry, I can't imagine this will happen, attach a short appendix showing the results of a calculation I did showing what would happen if an implausible bad spill of flo back occurred to streams in New York. Also, I urge everyone to carefully consider the tnerits of peer reviewed publications related to the Nlarcellus, Sometimes, the devil is in the details, as they say, In the case of the Osborne et al. (2011) paper on fugitive case, published by the PNA , it appears from my reading that the authors incorporated nurnerous samples from where gas release from wells was already known. This kind of sampling design seriously flawed the research conclusions. As l said orally, this design was akin to using a smoke detector to determine if a building showing flames coMIng out of the window, was actually on fire. However, to be fair, the authors have not posted their data set or made it available for other researchers to bolt at to be able to properly critique It, 0 I thank you for your patience and allowing me to speak at this hearing, Feel 0 free to contact me further for any elaboration or docurnentatiort you would like to see regarding my brief statement. Appendix ! le m Ivl mixing calculations to see whether Ls ouid be I have done some simp exceeded if flowbaok waters spilled into streams in southern Jew+ York. For this exercise I considered the case for flo back spillage during typical I ow strearnflow conditions measured at LISGS gauges in the New york parts cf the Susquehanna and Delaware River basins, Then, the river water that mixes with the flowbac4 Spillage would dilute the flowbaok the least, For my calculations, i assumed an implausible scenario MM lQ gallons per minute of flo backs spills corrtinuO rsly jr+to each stream considered, This spillage would be equivalen #to emptying a 15,g00- gallon to nicer truck per d3Y. 1=or convenience, 1 assumed that the river vuaters consisted of pure water, but my using measured background values would not charge my conclusions, Full rnix1rig of flowbaok spillage with the stream water would occur w ithIn a halfwMile or so do ristream. Figure I shows the results of my calculations, Were ray implausible scenario to occu ill r, t_s would be exceeded in only the very smallest cTee%s during low flow eo editions- isehere, Mixing of flowbaok with s tream water drops concentrations below M L values, and the stream water remains acceptable for drinking and human health. A recent concern over flowbaok radioactivity serves as a case in point, iii 1=lo back discharge from treatment facilities prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Envi ron rn enta I Protection last month to sairnple river waters for radioactivity. Not unexpected, the PADEP found no radioactivity in the river waters because of mixing and dilution. Simple calculations show this would have been the case. Even bromide concentrations in major streams and rivers at low flow would be below those producing trihalornethane issues in water treatment plantsr My calculations oVere done as goof of cOncepf, not as guidelines for regu ons, if releases of flowback water were to be perritted to Now York waters (I do not recommend this!), the State needs to decide stream flow below which discharge should not be allowed. This decision should be based from hydrologic drought indicators, such as the 7 -daY 10 -year low f1mv value, or perhaps some ecological threshold, coup[ed to site specific mixing calculations of tine bind !have done. During normal hydrologic conditions, M Ls would not be exceeded unless huge amounts of untreated flo back were permitted to be discharged at large rates_ 7 rt A'rea. ,. 1000.000 100.000 10,000 E 1.000 C ' 0.100 aci U a 0.014 a U 0.001 0.000 0.000 WM 16000 104000 100,000 Streamflow WS) 10006000 10000.000 Figure 1. Results of mixing calculations assuming continuous discharge of raw flowback fluid at 10 gallmin (about 15,000 galld) into streams. Flowback concentrations are rounded averages from four flowback analyses reported by the PADEP in Tioga and Susquehanna Counties. Flowback chemistry changes deeper further south. Baseflow obtained on October 30, 2010 from htt :llwaterda a.us s. ov wiwis /rt4 Arrows point to the streamflow above which concentrations would exceed MCLs under this implausible worse case scenario. Note that rivers logically used for drinking water, those flowing more than 50 cfs, have concentrations of all contaminants of interest below drinking water standards except for bromide. Photos of streams flowing at order -of- magnitude rates shown for reference. 0 DONALD I, STE EL Professor of Earth Sciences Departrnent of Earth Sciences 317 Reroy Geology Laboratory Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 132 44: Telephone: (315) 44836177 A. PROFESSIONAL Pf EPAIUTiON University of Minnesota Hydrogeology Penn State University Geology University of Rhode Island Geology B. PUBLICATIONS ( >125 peer reviewed) 1974 -1981 PhM4 1969 -1.971 KS. 1965 -1969 B.S. My academic research includes most aspects of groundwater geochemistry of dilute waters to brine, ground ater modeling and solute transport and etland� groundwater interaction. C. TEACHING 1. Syracuse University; (Graduate level] Hdrogeology, Groundwater and Solute Transport Modeling, Contaminant Hydrogeology, Aqueous Geochemistry, Wetland Hydrology .Professional Short Courses. Wetland Hydrogenlogy and Geochemistry, 1995; Effective Teaching of Hydrogoology: Haw to Make the Best Use of Scant " "Real World Data," Geol. Dciety of America 9 1996,1999; Applied Groundwater Geochemistry, Geol. Society of America, National 40 Meeting 2000) 2002; MA and NY Dept. Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation, 1990 -1994; Licensed Site Professionals Association of Mass (1999); Environmental Professionals of Connecticut, l cal Society of AmcriNa National AMeeting, 200'L. Professional Geologists (1997)9 Ge g Y Visual Modflow Groundwater Modeling for Managers, City of New York Dept. Environmental Protection, 1999 Pesticide Transport and (:ate, Montana Department Environmental Quality, 2000 Succeeding in Academia (2001), Association of Women Geologists and Geol. Soc. American, 2001 Tracer Methods in Hydrogeology Licensed Site Professionals Association of Mass (2006); Environmental Professionals of Connecticut (2007)9 D. SYNERGISTIC ACTIVITIES 2010- 1. Chair, National Research Council Water and `le chnology Board d (2007 - present]; present), Elected Member of the i ues For Assessing Ground Member National Research Council Committees on; ' 1 0 echn q is Water Contamination, (1991- 1993); Committee on Techniques for Wetland Delineation, (1993 - 1994), Committee on U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Division Research (1999 - 2001); Committee on Investigating Groundwater Systems at Regional and oglcal Survey Water Resources ion Research National Scales, Committee on U.S. Geol (2001 - present), Committee on Estimating Water Use in the United States; Committee on U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Division for the Future (2006 - 2010); Committee on National Stream Information System; Committee on Groundwater Fluxes (2001- 2002): Chair, Committee on River Science (20 Committee ttee on NAWQA, 2009 present. Effects of Coal Bed Methane Development,; Ch a r, m 2, Book Editor, Geological Society of America; Associate Editor; Journal Hydrology (2008 - present); Water Resources Research (1993 -1996; 2008 - present); Wetlands (1995 - 1998); Ground Water, (1997 - 200 "2); Geosphere (2005- 2008); Flydrogeology Journal (2004-2008)6 3. Mentored ~60 MS and PhD students to successful completions of their graduate degrees at Syracuse University, SUNY -ESF, UCLA,and Cornell University 0 10 t�, Member of Geological Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Wetlands Society, National Ground ateT Association f. HONORS Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Teaching Professorship, 2009, Syracuse University Mejnzer Award in HYdrogeology, Hydrogeology Division, Geological Society of American,, 2005 Wassertrom Prize for Graduate Mentoring, Syracuse University, 2003 Geological Society of America Councilor; 2002. -2006 laellow, Geological Society of America, 1998 Chairman, Hydrogeology Division, Geological Society of America, 1998 Distinguished Service Award, Hyd ro geo lo gy Division, Geological Society of Amer1ea, 2001 Birdsall- Dreiss Distinguished Lectureship in Hydrogeology , Geological Society America, 19924993 11 DEC: Local hydrofracking bans could end up in court I Star - Gazette I stargazette.coin DEC: Local hydrofracking bans could end up in court : wrliien by Jon Campbell 6:16 peal Jul. 61 2011 BINGHAMTON -- While the state would try to make sure new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale adhere to local laws and zoning ordinances, disputes between municipalities and gas companies would likely be resolved by a court, the state's top environmental regulator predicted Wednesday. In a editorial board meeting Wednesday, Department of Environmental Conservation commissioner Joseph Martens touted his office's latest review of high - volume hydraulic fracturing for natural gas. The report was released last week and is the latest step toward allowing the gas - drilling technique in NewYork. In its report, the DEC requires natural gas companies to show that any proposed sites for new gas wells are in accordance with municipal laws and ordinances. If it clearly isn't, the DEC could refuse to grant a ,Page 1 of 3 permit. If a dispute arises, however, it could get dicey. "If we can't decide on our own, then it may become an issue just between the applicant and the localgovernment," Martens said. "it may be that the courts will have to decide if something is consistent or not consistent (with local ordinances)." The issue could have major implications for some local governments who have moved to alter their zoning ordinances, or pass a law, in an effort to ban hydrofracking altogether. The City of Buffalo has already passed a law banning the practice, while the towns of Ithaca, Dryden and ulysses in Tompkins. County are all looking to tweak their zoning laws to keep gascompanies out. High - volume hydrofracking involves the injection of chemical -laced water to break up underground shale formations, including Print: Foinrered,By �� f= ormatDynarYiics o +n�ncnncnrn r_7 „oai_hwirnfran 7n•019nl l C7 DEC: Local-hydxofracking basis could end up m court I Star - Gazette I stargazette.com stargazette.corq the Marcellus Shale beneath the Southern Tier and parts of the Hudson Valley, and unlock gas. The practice has been on hold since 2008 and VVf11 stay that way until the DEC finalizes its review, which could come as early as next gear, Martens Saidr Herb Engrnan, supervisor for the Town of Ithaca, said his municipal attorney believes the town's zoning laws already prohibit gas drilling because it's not expressly permitted in the language. But, he ,added, it likely will end in a court battle. "We're sort of expecting that," Engman said. "I don't imagine the gas companies would give up without a fight, and that's one of the reasons why a number of towns I n Tompkins are doing the same thing, so we can jointfy defend.,, A total ban of hydrofracking could be a different legal issue. The state's environmental conservation law gives authority to oversee the drilling industry expressly to the DEC, but Martens said a judge will likely have to interpret the law to see if an outright local bars is permissible. "I think it can be banned in places (within a town)," Martens said. "Whether or not a town can say no everywhere, that's ultimately omething I think a court is going to have to decide." At least a dozen local governments in New York are considering, or have considered, some type of ban. Martens met with local government leaders Wednesday fn Binghamton, including Page 2 of 3 Broome County Executive Patrick Brennan and Binghamton Mayor Matthew T. Ryan. iri his meeting with the newspaper's editorial beard, Martens repeated his claim that with proper safeguards in place, high - volume hydrofracking is safe, "We've deliberated, we've considered the comments, we have looked at what's gone on in other states," Martens said. "Arid at the end of this stage of the deliberations, we've concluded that high volume hydrofracking can be undertaken safely, along with strong and aggressive regulations." Critics of the technique, however, disagree with Martens' assessment. About a dozers protesters waited outside the Binghamton Press & Sun- Bulletin newspaper's office to greet the commissioner as he left, and about a dozers groups will gather in Albany on Thursday to protest. "There's a real sense of concern about what's happening with the DEC's guidelines," said Claire Sandberg, executive y,. Protec't Your Home jNI'':t. Q2 xi d7i v al r,� i • 11 �1 Click Here to Lealen Mare! !=Ann Sumner WEEMEMM rorei: Joseph Solomon en#: Wed ne,5day, July 20, 2011 7:04 PM To: fury Aran Sumner; David Makar Subject: Personal statement - gas drilling ban My sincere apologies for my absence from tonight's board meeting but family{ health issues are a priority this evening. It is my belief the processes involved with natural gas exploration and extraatian via slick water hydrofracking a re an imminent and irreparable threat to the present and future citizens of the Town of Dryden es wel I as the Town's and adjacent communities' environment, natural resources and way of life. If I were in attendance this evening l would have wholeheartedly voted to ban natural gas exploration and extraction with 1n the Town of Dryden. Again my apologies to the Boa rd a nd all ire attendance for my abse nce th fs evening, Joseph D. Solomon Town of Dryden Councilperson Joseph D, Solomon, PE WEast n of Dryden Board Main St. Dryden, NY 13053 1 Appendix II -C Post Fearing Written Comments were received from: Kearv; Macleo Russ, Karl Clark, JaniC Cornwell, Nancy Bradbury, Jack S7rnanski, Ron Ruscll, William -[all, Olivia Quinn- Jacobs, f eier Mayer- ]{evi�i D icicinson, Cynthia J Reed, [ iiklie McGarrille, 1`3arbara Forsythe, Robert Sun, Jennifer Bern, Robyn Vrana, NeiTnan Downs, Stan QIIinn- Jacob5, David 8aviiio, Debbi C,ardesu, Sana Quinn- Jacobs, David Harvey. Jay Berg, Stuart. Gi -cgury, Peter Liner, Lric Shay, Mikol Vilcnas, Sofia Liner, Jillian St LaIlTQ11t, Angolika CrcrvaiS, StlZSIlnC Mermin, Dorothy ktice, David Wrege, Peter Quinn- Jacobs, Katie rici, fancy McGuire, Bob Rappaport, Andrew Multari, Joleen Morgan, Nancy Rappaport, Reuben Clark, Christopher Reiff, Meg &. Lric Baycr, Lorna Knapp, Renee Green, Alice ellner,asltia Wagner, [Mary Catherine Colt -s, Ray WQb519T) Mike Hillmali, Beverly Smith, Kirk Rogers, Barb Knapp, Christopher Sadoff, ,Ahrcn Pirsic, Rita Conner, Fred l °lu, shaoping Ball, Mary Dudley, ,Richard 1]icicinsan,RackLCl Gosse, Lois Colfer, Caro Elvetr -I 11 llur, Jessica lac1?onakcf, P,nicc MacCurdy, Robed Rt[ppert, David MiWeI Dan Arthur, Sen Henderson, loril:a I3arkcr, Sara DukNl o, Charles Khan, Peter NIA Gloria Edwards, June Edwin =Russo, Andrea Jt >3arkun, Marlene Bisscn Sreven Henc�l, istin ' Milker, Gregg Keene', Walter Kolb, Morgan Rhodes, Anna Ed wards, Jane Robinson, Robyn Wallace, Noah Whiter, Richard Sholty% Richard Baker, -Thom oruiek, Tere?ka Meyers - Mapco, Vicki Patterson, Mary A-Jc ahon. Eli7abefll Heat ley, Jennifer Davies,Cinn Ruth, Ue.In Kelhier, Jill Golding, Shira Buechel. Sharon oscltn,ann, Jancy Richmond, LaiTi Dryden Safe Enorgy Coalition (OSEC) - l"evinc. Treva Rcad, Nlarie henry 5- Jarimer Vilh�nas- Sofia Wraight, Sarah Enest. Adam Sraphra, Marianne ]defer, John �'oun¢, John 1nrleY, Lauri Wlson t Joeph Angels ver, Gerald McRae- Marie TOrcl lo, Joan Baker, Mitch eJl Gallagher, 'Tim Phillips, Chen Parks, .lobo E] lot Rvan, GrCfchell 10eCain3 Ron Taylor. Patricia Mooro, Arki Sinlitch, Andrea Quc;do, Nlatlialie Chase, Carol Christiansen, Morten DeNoyer, Linda Lambert, Hilary cT=aiTCn, David Apasov, Danila Yanor , Susan SiQnidzk!3 Eddie Sikberi, Bry'na KazJL)wski, Matthew Russell, Kathy (5cc copin,S almchCij) JAMN 0 VI Mary Ann Sumner From: Matteo Keary [mkeary @gmaii.comJ Sent: Friday, Jury 29, 20112:49 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Josepfi Solomon Subject: Comment in support of a hydrofracking ban Dear Supervisor Sumner and members of the Dryden Town Board: My wife and I have owned house(s) in the town of Dryden for 16 years, and are currently working to establish a sustainable homestead and small agricultural venture. NVe fully support a ban on hydrofracking in the area, believing such a ban to be instrumental in preserving the water quality we all enjoy. As we continue our search for a larger piece of land on which to expand our agricultural efforts, we would be inclined to bias our search in favor of Dryden properties if the ban were imposed and upheld. Sincerely, Matthew Keary & Lauren Doughty 541 Main Street Entria i f Ma Ann Sumner From. Sent: To: Subject: Dear Ms. Sumner, Nancy Cornwell [ncornvx11 i1haca_edu] Friday, July 29, 2011 11:18 AM Mary Arin Sumner Hydrofracking I am turiting to advocate for a ban on hydrofracking in our town. I remain wholly unconvinced of the safety of this procedure far our community member's, for our water supply and far our environment in general. The Marceilus shale is not going anywhere and there remains time to fully research, decument and contemplate the long term implications for extracting this non renewal resource for short term gain. Furthermore, the outdated compulsory integration regulations that involuntarily subject community members to hydrafracking are not justifiable with natural gas that must be removed by this invasive process. I urge you to support the long term welfare of our community and support the ban on hydrofracking. Nancy Cornwell Professor and Chair (on leave AY 2011 - 2012) Department of Television -Radio Ithaca college 953 Danby Rd, Ithaca NY 14850 6074274.1954 ncornwell ithaca.edu L Maq Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: Dear Ms Sumner, Olivia Hall [omh4@comell.eduj Friday, July 29, 2011 12:29 PM Mary Ann Sumner Please vote to ban frackingl I urge you to vote in favor of a strong gas drilling ban ordinance for the Torn of Dryden. As a first -time home owner of a small property surrounded by leased farms, I did not sign up for having my land forcibly integrated for fracking. I am strongly concerned about decreasing home values should a drilling pad be set up nearby (which is a very real chance, as a neighboring farmer's property is being considered for drilling - and some banks already refuse to give out mortgages for leased properties), let alone the potential environmental im acts on water and air quality as well as the noise and degradation of roads that can be Thank you for taking our concerns into consideration. sincerely, Olivia Hall 218 Irish Settlement Rd Freeville, NY 13068 1 P expected for sure. Thank you for taking our concerns into consideration. sincerely, Olivia Hall 218 Irish Settlement Rd Freeville, NY 13068 1 Mary Ann Sumner MP From, Sent: To: Subject: Dear Ms, Summer, Sindickinsonaol.onrn FrlGay, July 29, 2011 11 bl8 AM Mary Ann Sumner Hydrofracking San I and my busband are In favor of a ban on hyrdmfmck -ing and I urge you and the entire Town Board of Dryden to vote for this ban. As parents, my husband and I tivant our child to grow up in a healthy environment_ There are so many things afFeuting It already. We do not want our water polluted nor the additional traffic, or noise that canes from these operations. Mydrofrackirrg Is known to cause many health issues even If the opposition does not believe so. Foy family has beery in beekeeping for generations, and I can tall you the environment and nature is under enough stress please don't add to R by WoWing hydrofracking In our town, Thank you, Cynthia L. Dickinson GaRoy L Diclnson 26 Brooklyn lid. Freeville. NY 13068 d Mary Ann Sumner From: Robert [ref52188 @hotmall.com] Sent: Friday, July 29, 2011 11:01 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Cc: David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: hydrofrack Please vote to ban hydrofracking in Dryden.l don't want the beauty of our town ruined and our water poisoned by this unsafe drilling process that Is a threat to my health ,my children's health and everyone else In the community.l've been to PA and nearly run off the road by end less lines of large trucks bearing down the road in excess of the speed limit.A few ceo's of the drilling companies will get rich and some out of state workers will make good money for awhile and then leave our flown in a shambles. Robert Forsythe 0 Diary Ann Sumner Fronk; i�rrn n Vrana [nmv3( corrrall,edu] Sent: Friday, July 29, 2D11 JOL 52 AM To; Nary Ann Sumnerd Davld Makar; Jason Lelfer; sstlick dryd$nAy,us Subject: ban on hydrofraching Dryden Town Board Members, I urge you to issue a STROKC CAS DRILLING BAN ORDINANCE. I have lived in the northwest corner of Ellis Hollow and Turkey Hill Roads since 1951. 1 have a drilled well about 159 ft. deep. I have been drinking that water since 1951 and have it tested occasionally. There is no other source of water and my water tastes good. It used for cooking and drinking. I understand that bydrofracking would subject my source of water I have used since 1953 to farm and possible destruction. Therefore I am in favor of a ban on h drofracking. Norman Vrana nmv3 cornell.edu 1 i . Mary Ann Sumner' From: Debbi Savino [debblsavino04 @twcny.rr,com1 Sent: Fri day, July 29, 2011 10:10 AM To: Mary-Ann Sumner; David-Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Town Board re: fracking • • .. ' Dear Ms. Sumner &, Members of the Town Board; This letter is to urge you to vote In favor-of a total ban on hydraulic fracturing in the Town of Dryden. We do desperately need new jobs and new tax revenues - but what we will gain from fracking in terms of jobs and tax revenue is worth far less than what we would lose.. Despite the protests of the Industries and their supporters, hydrofracturing Is a aermanently- destrucOve method of 6tractfon. Further, It will result in the drilling companies' obtaining what will prove to be only a "nickel- and - dime's" worth of energy --and then leaving oe going bankrupt,. sticking residents with a never - ending clean-up bill that far.exceeds what was obtained In -terms of lobs and tax revenues. We will explore these two points in some detail in this letter. For the first point, "permanent destruction" Is a term I• do not use lightly. But the fluid used in fracking is not water, and they use LOTS of it to break up the rocks so the gas will come,out. tracking fluid Is reported to contain diesel fuel, soap, and other things one would not wish to drink or bathe in. Is this really true? We should know what this stuff is — but the companies won't tell us, they say It's "proprietary." So let's take a look at such Indicators as we do have. In the literature that they send out to potential Investors, the gas drilling companies all boast about more -or -less equal gas extraction efficiencies. But if the fluids are so different as to.need "proprietary "secrecy, how.come we don't see phrases like "the excellent performance of our proprietary fracturing fluld results.in g;compet#tive advantage" in this literature ?? You'd think if there was an advantage, they'd be selling it, But they're not. The underground shale's all pretty, much the same, too. So, fluids different enough to be. secret about are needed to frack? This seems unlikely - there may be minor differences but these would.not have much impact on the present Inquiry. So, if competitive advantage Is ruled out: • Why are they using this "proprietary mixture" dodge? If the fluids areyelatively benign as they state, they why does the Industry hide? • If the stuff isn't toxic, then why don't they come clean and show what Is made of? Wouldn't silencing public opposition with provable . truth be the simplest thing to do? . We can only conclude that they hide it, because they have something to hide. . Further, such chemicals DO NOT SEPARATE from water on their own, nor do they eves leave the ground, break down or otherwise become harmless. The drilling companies say that they recover "most".of the fluid:- but not all of it by.a long shot. 1 e So then —how many drops of diesel fuaI does it take to ruin a gallon of drinking water's They are not ta1k]ng parts per mI [Ile n, the fro ctlnn of diesel In fracking fluid is supposed to be several percent. We do not know of any vjay other than experisive dIstfflation to remove significant amounts of diesel fuel & soap from water and still leave the water drinkable, Another factor is that, even If one could afford to distill, then, what do you do with 'the toxic residue? Even by conservative estimates such residue would amount to 3 -5 gals a day of use teo oil ixe&Mth -soap glop; even more for larger families. Haw touch sloes this cost to dispose of? Like rnost of Dryden, we go our doinastic water from a private well. ado one's going to drill far gas oh our 3 acres, but they may want to d so ci n the Iarga fauns surrounding us, 5o me of the oWners of those farms have'"Sane gas energy" signs out from, and talk about landowner's rights, we'd be OK vi Rh this if there was no toxic fluid, or if it stayed only ors their property, or If It stayed way down deap like the industry says., Unfortunately, it won't - these fields travel sIgnIfIcant disonces undergraund thru the shale as they break it up. The whole hydrofnackIng pdndple depends an this. 5o how will the next -daor drillers prevent their spillover fluid from getting Into my well water? The ansbver is -THEY WON'T, but worse, TH> Y NEV1ER INTENDED To. The If A goes to the path of least resistance, so they couldn't prevent It from travelling every if they tr€ed% Once diesel fui�I gets Into our-water supply'and makes it unfit to drink, will the town ruck publlc water to my remote home? If the region gets tainted, where will the Town wells get their water? Whatever the answer is (if there Is one) will the drilling companies pay for that? Or will they just keep stalling and buy Jng time In court with "do n't- bIai-ne -u s" finger- painting as they have done In PA and other places, until they car: take the money and run? Even if dne goes through the mast optim1stic numbers, If fracking is aIf6vied In Dryden some mJlJions of gallons per year of toxics will remaln 6 and In the ground: if not far the jdbs and the taxes; if some company said they were going to came here and just pour this stuff out on the ground and it would never be clean again where'd be an uproar. So, are the Jobs and tax revenues really worth it ?This brings us to my ext point. Already, reports are circulating In some investment jotlrrials about how the current frenzied rush to frack natural.gas from shale may at best be another "Irya 4anal- exub6eranre" bubble, or at viorst an outright scare on a vast scale, as we have seen so many of in recent years. These reports discuss have gas industry reps base the estimates of how much natural gas is obtainable, by multiplying the delivery of the HEST wells by the IJfetime of LONGEST -LIVED wetts (never the same ones)— and how this wildly overestimates what Is actually recoverable from ail welts. In PA addlother regions where'frackir g Isowrentlygoing on, this Is dern onstra h I e -some re ce6tlymdri lied wells are already d a creasi rig in output Well, then, how a Ina ut revenues? it has bean widely reported that for most extractive activity, all the profits and hiQh- payingjobs go to corporate headquarters, with only a relatively few IoW- paying transport, drill rig, and service Jabs going to the host region. In return, the host reglun must put up vjIth and pay for road arLd infrastructure destriiCHOn, landscape destruction, outdoor resource destruction, and water resource destruction, , Never mind wanting the extractor to pay for thER damage, isn't it smarter not to allow it in the first place? Would anyone want to go eat on Dryden or Cayuga Lakes to let their kids swim and pray I the ail slick? Would we want to drive along the crumbling roads to look at the derricks instead of tha woods? How about that smog avid that stanch? Ones Wt It remind one of the city? Do we really want to put up with a l i that, 5 o that wre' It have a bit of money for a few yea rs? Isn't the absence of these things the real reason we live here, regardless of the local wage scale? 2 If we allow this fracking, in the short run we will gain a few jobs (not nearly as many as promised) and a temporary bit of • tax revenue (less than we project). We all know these jobs and those revenues are desperately needed ... but in the long run we will turn our beautiful wild region into an Industrial wasteland. If you've even been to Houston, TY, you'll know what we mean. A friend maintains that someday, industry and business will return to upstate NY because of the abundant clean water, which really is not available anywhere else. If you don't think this is precious, go anywhere west of the Mississippi and they'll tell you all about It. If you don't have water, there's no substitute. Please don't let it be wrecked for a few temporary bucks. Don't let them take the money and run. Please vote in favor of a total ban on fracking and all other extractive activity in the Town of Dryden. Thank you Debra & Jim Savino 61 Simms Hill Road Dryden, NY 13053 PS from Jim: For decades I have been telling people that upstate New York Is the outdoor world's great undiscovered secret. Now, finally, I live here. Please don't let business Interests wreck it. 3 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: ta: S��ject: Dear Ms. Sumner, ,lay Harvey [hjh4 cornel2_eduj Friday, July 29, 2011 9:05 AM Mary Ann Sumner In support of the ban on fracking I and my wife and family would IIke to reiterate our support for the ban against frackirig in the Town of Dryden. We have lived at 479 Midline Road, rreevlIle, for the past 18 years and fear that our way of Ilfe would be permanently and adversely a[tered by any drifting in our area. from what we have learned through communication with frlends who live and work in areas of Pennsylvania already impacted by hydrafracking, and by our awn transient first hand observations, we would #gate to see the same industriallzatlon of our land. We recognize that landowners heue a right to do what they wish with their own property but we believe that right should not be exercised to the detriment of the community as a whole. We love our area and feel strongly protective toward the watershed, the air quality, and the way of llfu. Thanks, !ay Harvey Christine Bellexxa Katherine Hervey Michael Harvey Mary Ann SuMner From: MikelShay @aol.com Sent: Friday, July 28, 2011 7:04 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: I Urge Strong Gas Drilling Ban Hi Mary Ann, Water & air quality, our most important resources, will likely never be the same again with current drilling technology. PA Is suffering great infra - structure detedoation from hydo- fracting. I urge you to support a strong gas drilling ban legislation. Thank you, Michael Shay 738 Ringwood Rd Ithaca, NY 14850 Ma Ann Sumner From: Angelika st,teurenk [angefika@ simonsU.cam) Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20111 D:34 ?M To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Piease vote to ban hydrofracking in Dryden Dear MaryAnn, please vote to restrict hydrofracking in Dryden as much as legally possible, if It can be banned, please, vote to ban hydrofracking in Dryden. Hy drofracking uses a severe hazard to our drinking water, both via (racking solutions affecting drinking wells below ground and via large volumes of waste water that likely will be dumped into Cayuga Lake. I'm also concerned about the number of accidental spills that might occur and strongly suspect that the clean up would someway or another be paid for by the town and the county. Greetings, Angelik,a st.Laurent 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: David Rice (david.rice @comell.edu] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 9:23 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Urge action to ban /restrict hydrofracking Dear Ms. Sumner, I am writing to urge the Dryden Town Board to proceed with action to ban if possible, or otherwise restrict slickwater horizontal hydrofracking in the town of Dryden. In addition to the multiple documented cases of water contamination, deterioration of roads and air and noise pollution, the natural beauty of Dryden and surrounding areas is a critical component in the area economy, both for tourism and attracting productive and forward- thinking residents. Horizontal hydrofacking on any scale would irreversibly damage this important resource. Thank you for yourtime and efforts, David Rice 1 Ringwood Court S. Ithaca; NY 14850 -9690 Town of Dryden 607 539 -6970 Mary Ann Sumner From: Nancy Sucl [nancysuci@yahoo.coml Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20119:15 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Gas drilling It seems that a total ban on gas drilling is the only way to guarantee testing, research on safe ways of accessing gas. I don't want us Dryden residents to be guinea pigs for the industry. Mary Ann Sumner From: Joleen Multad 0oleen303@yahoD.com] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20119:03 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: PLease vote to BAN HYDROFRACKING I am writing to you in order to express my support of a strong ban on hydrofracking in the Town of Dryden. I urge the Town Board members, to vote for a ban. It is essential to protect our community, the environment, and the people who live here. Hydrofracking is environmentally reckless and will result in a degraded quality of life in our `town. The threat to our water, air, roads and other infrastructure is huge and likely irreversible. We can't let this happen. These things cannot be overlooked. The increase in noise levels will also affect the quality of life in our Town and threaten property values. VOTE TO BAN HYDROFRACKINGI I Thank you for your help and consideration! Jol een .Multari 21. Hartwood ltd Ithaca, NY 14850 Town of Dryden resident 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Christopher W Clark [cwc2 @comell.edul Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20119:01 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: gas drilling ban Dear Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor, As a voting and tax paying resident of Dryden I respectfully request that you vote in favor of a strong gas drilling ban ordinance on 2 August. Sincerely, Christopher W. Clark 41 Hartwood Road Ithaca, NY' 14850 i Mary Ann Sumner From: Alice W. Green [aliceithaca @gmail.com] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 8:45 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Please support a strong ban on drilling in our town Dear Dryden Leaders, As a Dryden taxpayer for nearly four decades, Tve had many occasions to be proud of our town's spirit and accomplishments. Your vote August 2nd for a strong ban on drilling in our town will make me even prouder of Dryden. It will send a message that we can stand up to monied interests when it comes to protecting our precious water and the quality of life for our whole community. I don`t believe the economic benefits of hydro- fracturing can possibly compensate for the potential damage to our water supply, highways, homes, farms and small businesses. We should not allow the defilement of our fields and roadways with drill rigs and trucks. Our town infrastructure was not created for that kind of traffic. The risks of chemical accidents are only too clear from the experiences of other communities. We've heard from our Dryden neighbors about the bullying tactics of these developers. When you vote on the drilling ban,1 know you will be considering the well being of this and future generations. I hope that my grandchildren and their grandchildren can enjoy wading in the water of Fall Creek, on its winding path below our home, and drink clean water from our well. I appreciate your courage and willingness to lead us in taking a stand against an invasion than could rob our community of our most precious resources. Gratefully, Alice Walsh Green 609 Fall Creek Rd. 1 Mary AT Sumner From` Sent: To: rayrrrar trio mar @lacalnet WM1 1hursday,Juhf 8 20"V18:49PM Mary Ann StUnnef Fran do g Subject: in our area as we ar�d oany others in this area are am against any drilling 6 SuTIng sioQe Terrace Ithaca NY 1485$ Please note � be ef�ecte�J. Ray Coles tiJell water and could 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: raymnr [raymarlor�alnet.com] Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2091 8:49 PM TG. Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Fracking Please note z am against any drilling in our area as we and many others in this area are on well water and could be effected. Ray Coles 6 Sunny slope Terrace Ithaca MY 14859 1 Mm Ann Sumner Frorn, Sent. To: Subject: Kirk Smith [kirkesmith b:gMaiLcam] Thursday, duly 28, 2011 7:22 Pfd Mary Ann Sumner Ban art Frarking 4ear Dryden Town Board, I arm writing to void my support for the ban on hydrofracking In the town of Dryden t am very concerned about the IIkely damage to the ground water. The dlsrui:don W the natural beauty of the area with gas wens and such would be a great Shame and harmful to all, thank you fbr your consideration. Kirk Smith 888 W dryden Rd Freevilie, ny 130678 I f4ary Ann Sumner From: Ahren Jpel 3adoff [ajS50( oornall,eduJ Send: Thursday, July 28, 2041 TO Phil TO Mary Ann Sumner Subject: hydratraoklag ban Please vote for a ban on hydrof�acting. if this ban does not occur, our water, our roads and our health care facilities could all be in jeopardy. Ahren and Barbara Sadoff Residents of the Town of Dryden i 0 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sbaaping Hu [shaop1ng_5 yahoo.wrnj Sent: Thursday, July 28120115:55 PM To: Mary Ann Summer Subject: support ban fracking M, my rEaxne is ltaopi g Hu, i live at X 1 H -V i&ory ir. Ithaca 14850, T urgently support a Natal ban of Fracking in E1is Hallaw area. i Mary Ann Sumner From: Rachel DIckinson [mchel`@racheldicl€insaq,00m] Sprit: Thursday, July 28, 201 1 4:59 FM To; Wry Ann Sumner, David Makar; Jason Leifer; ssteliick@dryden.ny.us; Joseph 3(lornorl Subject: Vote yes for a ban on hydrofmcking As a resides ofthi Town ofl)ryden't urge you to voto yes on a ban for hydro fracking, 'There are many reasons to do this and some are listed below, 1 _ Vote for a ban until those drilling for natural gas reveal exactly what they are injecting into a well in terms of hydrofixc%ing fluid. As a taxpayer in the town 2 don't want itpumped underground and then extracted and stored somewhere, You can't mitigate against so meth i(ig iI "you don't know what it is. This is a publio health issue, that involves all of us and not just those MiQ have leasea_ 2. Vote for abaft until arose respansible for storage ofthewarter and hydrofraeMng fluid that comes out ofa well can prove they have a plan to deal with it safety (and that does 'not 'mean putting through our 'sewage treatment plants or spreading it on our roads). This is also a public health is s ue that involves all of us. 3_ Vote for a barn until gas drit]ing is also allowed in the New 'York City watershed. This raises redflags for me. Why is it not safo there but it somehow s afe in our watersheds? 4. Vote for a bar} until the DEC has enough employees to adequately monitor natural gas drilling sites. Tbey are woofully understaffed so that even with safeguards in place, there isn't the personnel to ensure that they are carried out. S_ Mote for a ban until wo fully understand the infrastructure implications from a mural gm boom. I spent quite a bit of time in central yer ing around Pinedale and drove through man -c=ps and saw a steady stream of heavy equipment trucks wearies out the little roads. Be careful what you wish for. With Wi. economic boom associated with gas drilling comes jobs but they are NOT lo cat jobs J4 drillers and roustabouts follow the rictus. Theo locals are left with dealing with the stressed in$astrudu,re, much higher crime rates, and often skyrocketing prices in the local stwes. b, Vote for a barn unless you're ready to really tackle noise pollution air pollution, Iight pollution -- all of which come with drilling_ 7. Voto for a ban unless you're really sure the town can handle a potential pubic heAth and environmental disaster if something goes wrong and our ground and surface water sources are contaminated. J would not want to by in your seats if that happens. Rachel Didkinwri 31 Main Street lireeville; NY 844 -4475 Rachel Diddrnson i r preewr'a w6ter Freeville, New Fork 0 o vM c(„Yalioo_ p,111 www- racheldickinc;6Li. co m btwP hehaikudiaries,tirordpr s_corm http,� /f�lconeruij ed rdt ress.coii1 607,844-4475 phone 607,279,9772 cell 1 IemberI American society of Journalists & Authors (A JA); ocietyofEnv Eronmental Journglisfs (S author of EALCONM ON THE EDGE: A Mark, ibis Birds, and the Changing Landscape of the American West (Houghton Mifflin Ruwurt) May 2009. 2 ME Ann Summer PM From: Bruce MacDonald [bruoeasm@grnaii,corn] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20114:02 PM To: Mary Aran Sumner Subject; ben Hydrofraking This is a plea to please bast hydrofracking j our lovely town of Dryden- There is mounding evidence that hydrofracking may potentially have terriblp. ramifications to our envimnment. Please help to pioted Dryden I Thank you, Jennifer NbcDonald H Mary Ann Sumner From: Dan Mittler [dm68@corneli.edu] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 3:42 PM To; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Gas Drilling IN FAVOR of a STRONG gas drilling ban ordinance. Dan Mittler Cornell University Mechanical Aerospace Engineering 218 Kimball Hall Ithaca, New York 18450 1 Work: 607 255 -9172 Cell: 607 227 -7393 Ernail: dm666cornell.edu Fax: 607 255 -2011 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sara E.:Barker [sb65 @cornell.edu] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 2:57 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Cc: ElliottSwer hout@vactormagneties.com Subject: Please support ban on fracking in Tovm of Dryden Dear Dryden Town Board, My husband and I are currently building a house on our 26 acres on Snyder Hill Road in the Town of Dryden. We searched for 4 years to find a piece of land that was not leased for gas drilling and finally found it on top of Snyder Hill. We are hesitantly building our dream home. i say hesitantly as I am scared to death of the possibility of gas drilling In our community. There are so many strong reasons why It should be banned and I'd like to list a few of what I feel are the most important below: 1) Water — why would we ever risk or sacrifice our aquifer for an activity that has a track record of contamination. If our wells are contaminated our property values will be 0. Will the state be able to buy back all of these properties at what was a fair market value when the local market has crashed due to water contamination? There Is no fixing water once it's polluted. We are very lucky to be flush with water in this part of the country and I believe many people do not realize the value or necessity of clean water. If wells begin to become contaminated it will be a national catastrophe for agriculture, for livestock, and more importantly foryou and me. 2) Property Rights — I've heard the property rights argument again and again. My husband and I will not lease our land so why should we be subjected to gas taken from under our land without our permission and risk water contamination just because our neighbors have leased and we are included due to a certain percentage of our unit having been leased? Isn't this infringing on my property rights in the same manner as someone who is told they cannot have a well drilled on their land? At least they will have received the signing royalty from the gas company, where we will have nothing but our rights striped from us. I do not understand how this can be legal. 3) our Children — we have two young children. I would never trade their health and welfare for gas royalties. The chemicals that are off - gassed at certain points of production and at compressor stations are cancer causing agents. Is money more important than our health? 4) Boom and Bust —there are papers that state that energy -based economies often go through a boom and bust cycle. The economic increase is not as great as people anticipate and a high income Inequality arises with lowered education levels and Increased crime. The flavor of a community changes as big box stores and chain restaurants follow the Influx of out of town service workers. Distraught townspeople begin to move out of the area (if they can sell their homes) and once the energy is extracted and the companies leave with their service workers, the community suffers a huge bust with its lack of economic diversity. Is this the Dryden that you wish to live In? It's certainly not the place where I want to live and own land. Lastly, my husband works in the oil and gas industry. He has been on hundreds of rigs and well sites. He knows first -hand what it is like to work in and with that Industry. in fact he was on a rig in Colorado during the Town Board meeting and thus could not speak that night. Just a week ago this rig site had a huge liquid propane leak that lead to a total lock down and drug and alcohol testing on the site. Men were seen running from the scene in hopes that a major explosion did not occur. My husband said if It had ignited, they all would have died on the spot. Is this risk of life really worth the possible benefits for a few from a source of fuel that is not even sustainable and could possibly be sold overseas Instead of used to help meet our energy needs at home? He will attest to the total lack of care that these big oil and gas companies have for the communities and areas that they infiltrate. It's all about the money and not about the people or community. This has happened again and again. t • r` k The gas Knot going anywtiem, so WHY are we rushing Into something that has not,yet been proven to be safe' Wfty not sit on this resource and wait until they have developed less invasive and risky tech'hlggN j for extraction in the future's 1 strongly urge you to vDte in favor of a ban on hydrofracking in the Towh of Dryden. ,,.,,, Thank you for your time, We certainly appreci4qte your wfllIngness to listen to your Town, Sara Barker 1 • 2 i 2 i Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: Gloria [gjdun2003 yahae.com) Thursday, .July 28, 2011 2'21 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: frocking Please protect our drinking water Mary Ann Sumner From: JUSTIN HERBEL Ousiinherbelf hotmail.com] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2899 2=09 PM To: Mary Ann SQrnner Subject. Drilling ban I am wrlting to vaive my SUPPORT for a gas drilAnq ban in Dryden. The reasons are OWousI Thank you, Justin Herbal, Freeville, NY E Y. r Mary Ann Sumner From: Gregg MIIIer [greggshere gmail,wrnj Sent: Thursday, July 283 2011 1:24 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner ` Subject: Hydrofracking Pear Members of the Board, Having attended rneetlnrgs throughout the region and immersing rrkyse[f tj understand the facts and not become park of the rhetoric; I think it is absolutely unsafe to hydrofrack_ The irn pact would be devastating on all levels, Sincerely, Gregg Miller 1199 Ekkls Hollow Road i Mary Ann Sumner From: Jane Edwards Uedwards1 @frontlemet.netj Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 9:35 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: In favor of a gas drilling ban Dear Town of Dryden Supervisor: I write asking that the Town Board pass a gas drilling ban for the Town of Dryden. Not only will gas drilling change the nature of the community, it will potentially destroy the infrastructure of our built world, le roads, wells and also the natural world, le water, plants, trees, animals. Habitat will change. The quality of life will change. Those who benefit in a financial way will also live in a hurt environment. Their short term benefit will bring great suffering to the rest of us. Please consider the longterm health and well being of all who live in this town, and vote to ban gas drilling. Many thanks Jane Edwards 1 Foothill Road - shareholder of the Yellow Barn Water Company, which I hope will become part of the Dryden water district. Four wells threatened by surrounding leased land. Over 250 people in danger of bad water, lower property values, just one example of an "entity" threatened by potential gas drilling. • i Mary Ann Sumner From: dchard winter (rlwinter @yahoo.com) Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:23 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Fradng Mary Ann, We are quite concerned about the possibility of gas drilling in our community. Although it may offer some economic rewards, after carefully reviewing information from what is happening in Pennsylvania, both my wife and I are opposed to any drilling activity. Please support a strong ban on fracting in our community. Richard and Marlene Winter 22 Crystal Drive 11 Mary Ann Sumner ® From: Terezka Korinek [markova66@hotmail.com] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:04 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Please vote to BAN hydrofracking Importance: High Dear Mary Ann Sumner, Please vote to ban hydrofracking. There are so many ill effects directly associated with hydrofracking and Pm sure you've heard them all. In any case, the negative effects far outweigh the few short term economic benefits. My husband and I and our two young daughters moved to Dryden 4 years ago partly to be surrounded by its peace, quiet and bucolic beauty. I am confident that a ban would not only preserve a high quality of life that so many Dryden residents enjoy but also prevent many residents from leaving Dryden. Thank you for all your efforts. Sincerely, Terezka Korinek Steve Anagnostos and two daughters 378 Thomas Rd. 14850 • P Ma Ann Sumner From: mrsmcp [mrsmcp @aol.com) Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:59 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: ban on fracking Hello Mary Ann, Thank you for all your hard work. Please ban (racking. We need to find a safer way to access the gas. it will be there when we are ready. In the meantime, let's protect our land and water. Water is going to be such an important ingredient to the life of the planet. We can not afford to use such quantities and add harmful chemicals to it. Business will not prosper if the land and water are spoiled. Renewable energy is what we need to work on, solar and wind. Thank you, Elizabeth McMahon 1 Mary Arrn from: ben #: To: Subject: Caleb Ruth [caleb,ruth grmai1,coml Thursday, July 28, 2041 40:56 AM Mary Ann Surnnar; David Makar; .iasoti Leiter, Stephen Stalick; Joseph Solomon please vote YES to ban (racking in Dryden To. 'Mary Ann Sumuer, Dryden Town Supervisor David - kar, Dryden Town Board member Jason I fifer, Dryden Town Board member Steve Stelick, Dryden Town Board M mber Joe Solomon, Dryden Town Board member From: Caleb Ruth 3 Sunny Slope Rd, Diydern, NY Dear Board Members, Having attended last weeps tmvn board meeting, I want to express directly to you my support #or BANNING KACKIN within Dryden- Dryden is a beautiful town that would be irreversibly damaged by the eXpansi '. on of fracking as is fikOy to happen unless the board enacts a ban. The expansion of fracking is happening too fast and the industry-is ignoring or xn, Irmzing the risks to peaceful country - living. The opposition says that we should find a middle ground. I believe strongly that a ban IS the middle ground, As tha board stag, it is not allowed to "regulate" the industry and a ban is our only recourse. A ban would put drilling on hold until more clarity is farmed around the environmental impacts at both the state and local level- If the Nd DEC and the industry return with favorable conditions and regulations, I would be in favor of reconsidering allowing drilling- However, at this point our only recourse is to ban fradk na. 'it truly is the only middle ground at this point, ' Sincerely, Caleb Ruth i Mary Ann Sumner from: Nancy Lee oschmann [r�ancykasch3menn@me.00ml Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 10;46 AM o; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Vote fora ban on frocking Dear Dryden Town Board Member, My husband J> Jien Victor and I want to urge you to vote for a strong ban ,against fracking in our ronrrnunity, Surely it should be apparent by now that thee su -calW economic benefits of gas drilling will be more than a feet by the loss of our watershed, polluted air, the cost of road repair and waste disposal, tI►e loss of our beautiful counlfy side, and the chaos creatfd by trucks, tempoTary workers and the disruption of our rural nelAborhoods. And this is not for "gas for the US" but I;as for other countries and profits for tale rich, We bought our modest country home in the town of'Dryden to try to jive as green as possible, and tho pos.�ibtlity of an environmentally detrimental, corporate takeover in our r] OW carnmtinity is ,sad and shocking. X have spoken with residents who, some years ago, leased their land without understanding the consequences, and are now writing letters much like this one, .Please do the right thing, the compassionate thing for our earth and our community, and vote7 to ban fracki g from this area. Pf rhaps we can also be a model for others communities faced with this potential devastation of resources. 'thank yon), Nancy Koschrrinrn 705 Ringwood Road 11 J Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject. Dear -fury Ann Sumner, Treva L Levine [trev alev ine @ co rn el Ledu] Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:40 AM Mary Ann Sumner Doug Levine (daug[hubcaP_ws) Letter frorn the Levines We are writing to you in regards to the issue of a fracking bars in the Town of Dryden. It is imperative to our family that fracking not be allowed in the Town of Dryden at this time. It can hc+ve disastrous effects if there are spills. Xt concerns us that we don't knave the chemicals in the fracking potion. It upsets us that we are so willing to lease our land for a few dollars to companies whose pracesses are not fully understood and have devastated other areas of the country. Please impose a ban and buy our community time by doing so to thoroughly understand and to consider the Issues and our desired outcomes. Buy Us time to consider benefits and costs of allowing the fracking business to move into our area (Oconomically, environmentally, socially, etc. ), if we ruin our land and drinking wafer because we are in such a Murry for the dollars, we won't see any sort of reversal In our lifetime, if ever, please consider that we could be leaders an this issue and be part of a positive solution for people on both sides of the issue now and in the futurev we use a well, we purposely chose to salt up our house and livLas In the tcnun of Dryden because of the puce and beauty of the area. We didn't want to commute so consciously and happily pay higher taxes. Wa have two young children who are In daycare on Lounsberry Road. We are looking forward to our chAldren going to Caroline Elementary School. He are members of the Ellis Hallow pool and run the Music in the Hollow series on Tuesdays with monies provided to us by the Town of Drydenp We are gainfully employed, sit on multiple boards between us, and we obviously love and participate in our amazing community. Wa those to live here and saw ourselves hers for a long time. We recently started to discuss tha reality that if our well is poisoned or even threatened we may need to reconsider these deci5ion!5. We have started to talk about raving this area and other places we would consider living. We are talking about leaving an area that we consider home, there our friends 11ve, and that we love so much because there seems to be such a threat to our family's health and our community's overall well being, We won't be part of community that doesn't think and plan responsibly for its own future and people. The issue of fracking has brought us to this uncomfortable realityd if fracking is to be allowed in this area in the same way it has showed up in other areas of the country, it is not a place wa want to be and we are fortunate to h@Ve the skills and ineans to leave. Please be part of a decision that bans fracking. Entourage opening the discussion to the community about all growth opportunities and to find solutions to problems that bring desirous results to evt�-rycne not just the pockets of a few. M? really appreciate your willingness to serve your community as a Dryden Town supervisor. You have a great deal of responsibility at this time. We urge you to continue to take seriously this issue as it affects our community now and In the -future. It is a game changer. 11 aril you for reading this message and taking the time. Sincerely, Treva Levine? and Doug Levine, 8 Bunters Lane 687m5399 7e47 k Mary Ann Sumnrr - - -- - From: Sofia A Vflienas [svi11 enas aornelIredu] Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2011 10;41 AM To: David Makar; Mary Ann Sumner; Jason Lelfer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solorpon Subject: Re; piease Vote to Ban Brilling in Drydan Dear Dryden Tovrn M tubers, I forgot to include my address: l9 Genung Road- Than ks far all your efforts, Sofia Softy Ville0as, Ph.D, Director, Latina Studies Program Associate ProfessorofAnthropology, Eduration & Latina Studies President- Elea, American Educational Studies {association h[k�; w4vw.educ2ttonal , tudies.o The Latino Studies Program 434 Rockefeller Hall College of Arks and Sciences Cornell University Ithaca, MY 14853 sav33cornell.edu Phone, 607- 255 -3197 vrJav a v e v V - .. -��. •�F From: Sufla A +Vfllenas <sv llenas corneILedu> Date: Wed, 27 Jul 201123:18:14 -0400 u�' dm cdd u>, "supervisarpdrfgt .nu" <superu To; "cmakar drydenn , lsarC dryden nv,us >, Ili tien,n ,us" leifcr d der�.n . us >, "ssteIick dr den.n ,us" <s Ste Iickadryden . ny. -us >, "isolornon drA-9n ny.us" <-solomcn dr den.n .us> Subject: Please Vote to Ban Drilling in Dryden . Dear Dryden. Town Boand Meirbm I all, writirig to urge yoll to vote fo r the strongCSt bm against drilling in the Town ofDiyden. Our lend and water are precious and vital and cannot be given up for a few dollars_ I completely agree with Catskill Mutintain keep er han -d1ey write, "The reality is m t17at No a unt of regulation, NO amoant of perrniftuYg guidelines, and NO armunt of taws and ordin dnices Carl Protect oiLa- water and con nunities from a reckless industry as long as our regulatory industries continue to tack die staff amd resources they need to properly erirce sricb. mandates" iww Catskill ntai ;per). I do not want our lovely area to be snarled with traffic, noise pollution and to affect oiV tourism and local ecvnnnty in general, We have nothing to gain except a few dollars and IrreparaWL damage. If hydrofi-acking comes to Dryden, our area will never be the same_ And I will move away to a place where my family`s health and well -befit will not be Fandangered. z Mary Ann Summer From: Marianne Gaphra Imarlannesaphra gMall,com] Sent: Thursday, July 283 2011 1om16 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner subject: concerning the Aug 2 vote Dear Town Of Dryden Board members, I am concerned about the effecus, both 0ready documt�rrted and possible, ofhydmfrackingto ouT aommunitY, These include damage to the water table through bath pollution and depleticn, damage to our road systems, and snd dispose; issues_ Plemeteake the step of banning hydrofracking in our community until these concerns have been resolved, Thank you, hfarianmL, Saphra 21 enung Circle Ithara NY 14850 51 Mary Ann Sumner From: Laura terizlergmsg cornall.edu] Sett: Thursday, July 28, 2811 10106 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban Hydrnfracking in Dryden, please Dear Ms, 5Urnner, Thank you far corisidering the ban on High- voI urn e Hydraulic Fracturing fn the town of Dryden, I urge you to vote Yes to ban this pract1 %vhen the Town Board meets on August 2, Fracking would charnge the nature of our region forewi�r and should be banned outright, ARV emnomic benefit it might bring - and there are claar gig nsthat only d few Ind iuMdualswould benefit- Is nat worth the environ menta I risk and the devastation to our Sway of life that would ensue, I support your efforts in Dryden to keep this practice out of our town, 5incereiy, Laura 5tentier Uiura StetWer Lab Manager Evolutionary Biology Program Cornell Lab ofOrnithulogy 159 Sapsucker Woo& -Rd , Ithaca, New York 14850 Office; (607) 254 2141 LW (607) 254 2142 Fax; (607) 25424S6 Jms @CGra3 le i,edu Ann Sumner FMM: toreij aol.00m Sent: Thursday, ,duly 28, 2011 9:58 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: ban on hydrofraoking + e are strongly in favorot a bare on hydrofracking. The risks to our water and environment are too gfeatto allow this method of drilling. jo 3n and Walter Tore Ila R Mary Ann Sumner From: Ellen Phillips [ephiAip lcsd.kl2,ny.us] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20119 652 AM To: 'supervisordryden.ny,us Subject: FVV: NO FRAC Importance: High Mary Aran Sumner, bryden Tow n Supervisor: THERE ARE NOT ENOUGH I NSPECTORS TO POSSIBLY look at all wells identified!! i PLEASE — ob NOT allow drilling in DRYDEN_ Citizen of Dryden, E61en Phillips 4 Woodland Rd. lthara, NY 14850 607 -539 -7273 from* Ell en Phillips Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 201111;59 AM To: 'su pervisor@dryderk.ny. us' Subject NO FRACK Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor: Please consider our beautiful resources cannot be unpolluted once an aocidert occurs. 110 Well ", will nut bring back our ipeutifully, clean end mighty fEne tasting uvelk water! I beg and pray PLEASE Do Nat Let Fracking come to Dryden. Your fellow dtizf n of Dryden, Ellen Phfliips 4 Woodland Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850 607- 539 -7273 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: decain [decain enveonsu King, biz) Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 9:41 ATE To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Wydrofracking ban am strongly in favor of bannMg all gas end oil driilirig, pailiculady hydrofracking, in our town of Dryden. This is not somathing our quiet and beautiful landscape needs. Please vote soon to preserve our health and quality of life by banning hydrofracking, Best regards, Rory Leah+ Weiland Specialist T.,eCah: Errvironwnenfal Services, h1c, 607-31948J9 11 Mary Ann Sumner From: Andrea SimItch [aIS34 corneli,eduJ Sent: Thursday, du[y 28, 2011 9938 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: bars an hydrefracking Dear M;zry An% I strongly favor a ban on hyrdofracking and urge you to vote for th that the environmental impact of hyrdofracking has been thoroughly before moving forward on this process, and thu only way to do so is this time. Sincerely, Andrea Simitch 286 Rldline Road 697 539 6494 assoclata professor director, bachelor of architecture program cornell university 1 is ban, Me must ensure Pesearched and debated to ban the process as Ma2 Ann Sumner Eton: N orten Christiansen [;Dhdstiansen C.ornell.edul Sent: ThVrsday, July 28, 2011 9:28 AM To: Mary Aria Sumner Subject: Please vote iri favor of bannM hydrofraoking in Dryden TO 14ary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor, I think it's crucial that 0ryden impose a strong ban on hydrofracking. Given the data cgming out from othgr communities that have allowed �yd rofratking, t am very conceN ed about our water ps well as the general impact on the enVironment in terms of both general pollution and # creased industrialization. I do rea4ize that some Foenbers of our community stand t6 benOflt ecanvmically from allowing the drilling to take place but the long -term costs to the Community as a whole now strongly outweigh any short- an¢ medium -term monetary gains, z therefore urge you to vote in favor of banning hydrofrac king in pryden. Best regards, Morten Christiansen 10 HWnter Lahe Ithaca, NY 14850 (Town of Dry 0n) _..w__n Morten H. Christiansen, PhD External Professor,'Sarata Fe Ihstitute Co- Oireutor, Cgrnell Cognitive Science Program Phone: +1 { 7 ZS5 -3834 (dept) Professor, Department of Psychology Fax': +1 (507) 255 -$433 Cornell Unzver�ity Email: christlansenPcornell.edu Ithaca, NY 14853 Offices �Z8 Uris Hall Web: http://Wm,P$Ych.cornell.edu/people/Faculty/mhc27+html Correll CognitivO Neuroscience Lab: httpi//Cnl,psych,cornell.edu L Ida Ann 5uMner From: David McFarran [davEdmofa�rf 9mail,00m] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20119,25 AM #; Mary Ann urnner Subject: It's just commart sense (FracRing ban) Dear Mary Anr4 leis just common sense, really- When does it.EVER make sense to force poisons deep into the eurxh? X am a strong believer in what goes around Dames around' . These slickwater hacking fluids may riot read the aquifer for 500 years Mang after all of the natural gas has been extracted) but when it does, where will clean drinking water carne from? Please don't Iet short term gains wiu out over long term harm, David McFarren 1284 Ellis Hallow Ruad Town of Dryden PS: There is a Canadian company that does fracking without using any harmful chemicals_ Why can't e? I MaD Ann Sumner Frain: addle teddie ednartonitd.corn) Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 9:21 AM To: MaTy Ann Sumner Subject: In support of a Ban on Hydrofracking I am writing this statement Board Men,l> s to vote for quality oflife in our Town, The increase in noise level{ threaten properly values, in support of a strong bz a ban_ Hydrofracking is The threat to our -Water, L s another factor which n on hydrof Luki ng in the 'down of Dryden_ I urge the Town environmentally reckless and will result in a degraded air, roads and other infrastructure cennot be overlooked. will compromise the quality of He in our Town and In addition, I do not feel comfortable that any set of State or Federal regulations will be sufficient to Support safe practices. With homing budget cuts. and the resulting cuts in staff', it is Certain that even with strong laws the industry will still do what is lest (i,e, cheapest for them) knowing that inspections will be rare and even if cited, fines will just be another cost of doing business_ The history of extractive industries, mining and drilling, all across the US and indeed the world show a Blear and indefensible pattern of abuse to the environment and the tonal pOpulatior�_ It is al-ways the corporate interests that prevail in the rape, profit and run business ino del that the drilling and mining industries have made their historical legacy. They make the profits and then leave, while it is Lett to government to clean up t#re costly mess_ If major accidents Occur the entity is often drained ufits assets and hisolved leaving no ono responsible for the damaged parties too go after. If this stratC y is not used and the corporation still exists, the legal process is iscostly and could tape years. Thank you for your Comilderation, Eddie Sieradzki 21 Hartood Road, Ithaca, ''Y Town of Dryden resident. luas s notified the smder that this message has been received_ 1 Mary Ann Surnner From: rnatthew kozlow$M [mattkaz94 yahao,com] Sent: Thufsday, July 9, 20119:02 APB Se Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Jason Lelfer; St ephen #a<<cic; JoseQh Solomcrr ubleet: Public comment- Hydraulic Fracturing Vote Dear Dryden Town board Members, I am wrhing to ask you to support a mng ban on snduslrial activities such as lyydraulic fracturing natural gas extraction in the Town ofDryden. By banning Bur h activities from our beautiful landscape I believe that you would protest our: Natural environment (Land, surface anti subsurface water resources, air quality) hiving environraerrt scenic resources, noise levels, drinking water resources, traffic) Infrastmmre (damage to roadways axed treatment facilities) Local Economy Tong and short term reduced property values tres ifing in ].aver tax revenues, reduced tourisirn resources and attrackion .personal property rights (forced compulsory integration to sieze vela a from resider►ts propeaA}' and given to corporate interests regardless of vpPosttiori and without: fair ccotuamic campcnsatiott for reduced property value and quality of life) I am a town resident and support a vote #`or a comprehensive ban on Aug 21id 2011 _ Matthew Kozlowski 401 Irish Settlement Road Freeville, NY 13068 i Mary Ann Sumner From Sent: Tom Subject: HI Mary Ann, Kad Russ Pfuss99mall.com] Thursday, July 28, 20118'245 AM Mary Ann Sumner barb on drillIng please stay firm in banning gas drilling Cn DrydenI There are almost daily new and disturbing facts appearing like use of drilling wart water spread on our roads or the 300 -x 00 Million Dollars for road and bridge repair per gear caused by 2,5 million truck movements. Thank you for your time, sincerely Karl Russ 137 Hunt Hill Rd 4 WE ft on 4N 1rV%ndmr Jack W. Bradbury Obradbury .corn$li.eclu) From: Thursday, July 28; 2-011 8.23 AM S er�i: To: Mary Ann tamner, David as da , Jason nLeif r, Ste hen Stelick; Joseph �o omvn Subject: Vote In support of strong g 9 As residents of 4ryden who have spent a lot of time researching the issues, we absolutely do NOT- want hydrofracking in 1) ryden, Ail the reasons are very compelling: air pollution, rl5k to water supplies, truck trsfiiic, noise, etc, The fact that wvhat we letting it occur would seriously affect all our neighbors (e. g. downs #ream 1n Ithaca) is also a big factor, And these effects are long -term as evidenced In gas drilling sites all over the country. We had not realized untli rctently that both New Jersey acrd France {the country 11 Y,ad banned hydrofracking, if NYC and Syracuse get their watersheds exempted, we should toom the Df argument that they have no filtration system is irrelevant; we don't either. please a dd our two votes to Your list itti supp the ordinance. And do NOTa(cept some intermediate compromise like Bruno RroROhe wayhwei did of rlgrn a lafse, I had the Corporation have, a foot i n the door 1s all they need W go ali the way eventually, Ry land rrtan otit our front door 5 minutes after he started his pitch and told him never to return. Jack Bradbury Sandra VehrentamR MW Jack 8 radbury- ernai19 iwb25 cornell.edu Sandy Vehmno@mp- email{ clvs Cornell eedu. 81 Besemer Hill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 Phone. 607- 539 -7325 I I Mary Ann Sumner From; Peter Quinn�acabs [pets JQquinn gacobs,arg] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 8: � 3 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; jsoiornork dryden,ry.0 Subject. Hyrdaf racking Ban l♦ello, 14Y name is Peter Quinnm3acvbs. I am 19-years old, and a senior studying English at Wells College, I am a Dryden resident, and wish to be continue to be one in the future. I spoke before about hyrdofracking at a recent meeting cf the town board. From the research I have done on the subject both online and talking to experts, I have concluded that hydrof racking as it is is an unsafe practice, one that will most certainly ruin the landscape and the people of this town. I also know that any possible benefits cf hydrofracking are small; the natural gas under the Marcellus Shale region won't last us long at all, and the method of extracting it will only hasten global warming. If we are truly concerned far Dryden's energy future,- ldhich we should be-we must consider cleaner, more renewable energy sources, and there are plenty that would suit Dryden well. Thank -you. I appreciate all the thought that is going into this decision. I look forward to hearing the results of your vote on or before August 2nd, Peter Quinn - Jacobs I Mary Ann Sumner 0 From: Lillie Reed [millio_reedgmafl.ovm] Sent: Thursday, July 28, 20118:05 AM Tv: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban gas drilling in Dryden I am its favor of a gas drilling ban ordinance in the Town of Dryden. Our env ironment i s to important to allow drilling to take place, Millie Rwd 162 Gerning 'toad i 0 Mary Aran Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: Tear Mary Ann Sumner, Jennifer Sun Uennsun43 yahao.coml Thursday, July 28, 2DI 1 8:03 A Mary Ann Sumner ban f Vdrafracking HydrofraCking has proven to have devastatlas of Acts on ground water quality which impacts the health of all living systems that depend on that water which includes me and my family, For this reason, I strongly urge YOU to vote in favor of a strong gas drilling ordinance in Dryden. a concerned citizen, 74�nnifer J Sun 588 W, 'Dryden Rd Freeville, A]Y 13068 1 Mag Ann Sumner From: Stan DmWs [desertstan @g mail, Gom] Sent: Thursday. July 28, 2011712 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Hydrofmcking Dear Mary Ann Sumner Please note my opposition to hyftfracking in the Town of Dryden. I live at 395 Rin ood R.d, Our wonderful rural environment would be ruine4 here with trucks and equipment rolling over our roads 24 'hrs a day, not mention the 24 hour noise and pollution fLem the drilling itself, We rely on pristine water from our well that supports our life here and fear contamination to it, that has happened in other rural commurthies from hydrofrackin, . Please doA allow hydrofracking in our town, Thank You Stan Downs, 395RingwaedRd Freeville Icy 13068 desertstan giginailcom 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sana Gardescu [s923 comell_edul Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 5.31 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar: Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelickp Joseph Solomon Subject: Support for WIIng ban As a long -tern resident of the Town of Dryden, and one of many homeowners relying on well water for drinking, I urge you to vote for the ban that would help prevent local hydrefracking drilling. I am concerned because any toxic the disturbed bedrock, will tend across a range of distances afrom water. Additionally, the wear on Dryden vehicles and drilling sites will gases, such as methane and radon, that are released within to move upwards through cracks in unknown directions and the drilling site, potentially threatening our drinking and county roads wlll be costly, and the noise of large damage the pleasant rural character of our Town. Thank you for this opportunity to express my concern. 5ana Gardescu 108 Bunt Hill Road Ithaca MY 1185@ (Toxgn of Dryden) sg23Pcornell.edu I Mary Ann Sumner Frnro: stuagberg alum,rpi,edu Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 11165 PM Tin: Mary Ann Sumner; David il+iake�; ,lasan Lelfer, Stephen Stelick;.los'ph Solomon petecdavies ournell.eduI mlavine twrcn +,rr.com Subject: Request to please ban hydWracking in the Town of Dryden Dear Mary Ann, David, Jason, Steve, and Joe, We strongly request that you ban hydrofracking in the Town of Dryden, flew york State has already banned hydrofracking in the Now York City and Syracuse watersheds due to concern for the health} of those residents, As residents of the Town of 0rydon, we ask that you protect us from hyfdrofracking since a similarly do not have water processing plants (we have unfiltered water wells) very much 11 k the watersheds maritioned. Please protect Yawn of Dryden residents like New York State is protecting N ew York 0 ity and Syracuse residents. Sincerely, Stuart and ,lean Berg 99 Hickory Ciorcle Town of Dryden Ithaca, NY 14850 Mary Ann Sunnner Tom: Sofia A Vilienas Isvi lien as romel1.edu] ent: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 11:18 PM 7o: David IMAakar, Mary Ann 8 umrker; Jason heifer; Stephen Steli ck; Joseph Sol amon Subject: Please Vote to Ban Drilling in Dryden . Dear Dryden Town ]hoard iVembeils I am writing to urge you to vote for the strongest ban against drilling in the Town of Dryden. Our land and water are precious and vital and caxrnot be given up for a few dollars_ I coinpietely agree with Catskill lWountainkeeper when they write, "The reality is that NO amount of regulation, NO amount of 9 9 permitting gaiIC� t11 L5, and O amount rf laws and ordinances cats protect our water and communities from a reckiess i tidu st ry as long as our regulatory industries continue to lack the staff and resources they need to properly enforce such mandates" (www,gatskiIIinou tit ainkee ep r- orb;), do not want our lovely area to be snarled with traffic, noise pollution and to affect our tourisin and Iocal economy in general, W e Have nothing to gain except a few dollars and irreparable damage. tfh drofracking comes to Dryden, our area will never be the same. And i will move away to a place where my family's health and well -being will not be endangered. please join with the Towns of Ithaca and Caroline to stand together and protect our land, water, economy and well - being] ohaok you, Sofia ViliemS Sofia Vilienas, Ph.D, DireCtar, Latino Studies Program Associate Profe =r of Anthropology, Education & Latino Studies President - Elect, American Educational Studies Association http://www.edticatiorialstudi,es,org 1 The Latino Studies Program 434 Rockefeller Hall College of Arts and Sciences Cornell UnILversity Ithaca, NY 14853 saM comell.edu Phone; 607 -255 -3197 1 Marry Ann Sumner From: Suzanne Gerva Is [suzanne.gervais comell.eduj Sent: UVednLt -slay, July 27, 2011 14:53 PM 70: Mnry Ann Sumner Subject: please vote for banning hydrofmaing Dear Mrs Summer am writing to urge you to stand for me and my fellow citizens of Dryden to ban hydrofrackIng in our Wwn. i very much pre about the quality of life in Dryden and the quality of our wate6hed and of CayUga lake. [believe hydrofraticing in our town wl11 destroy the peaceful Ilfe we strive for acrd w1lI not h ng long term benefits yet will bring very long term damage of all sorts, geophysi cal, to the landscape, to the noise and light and road hazards to he ightened pollution —yes in the end hydrofracking is not a solution to our energy crlsls, I count on your vote to ban hydrofracking. 1 thank you to represent my concern and desire foe a peaceful and healthful life in Dryden swarine Gervais I Kingwood Court south, Ithaca, ICY 14850 P 7J, &nn qumnar Frarn: sent: To: Subject. To; Town Supervisor From: Or. Peter wrege .wra eacornell.edu Or, Peter Wrege [p- wrege @cOmell-edul Wednesday, July 21, ?011 9;39 PM Mary Ann Sumner Town of Dryden CcnWt: Comment message: Comment to register re: zoning amendment to ban gas drilling. Dryden Town resident since 1973, Ws I feel that it is extremely important to pass ts amendment in order to protect not only our quality of life but also our health and safety, Several speakers zit the public comment meeting suggested that the amendment would "close the dnnr" on the pOssibility of drilling. 7h is is not the case. The zoning regulations can always be revised again in future should proven safe and non - intrusive methods be developed to extract gas from the shale deposits underlying our town. The most important thing to do right now to maximize all fuiure options is to put a strong restriction in place so that the town has as strong a position 25 possible for controlling what comes next. Ike all know that there are differgftces of opinion as to the amount Of say that local communities can have on this industrial activity, but if we "wait and see' as some advocate, we could lose an important apriori position. T believe there are many reasons that horizontal hydrofracturing is an industry that we do not wart here in Dryden or anywhere else, but a few that weigh most on my mind are these: - the rural scenic assets of our region are among the most valuable to me and these qualities will be severely compromized for many years, if not for my lifetime, by the proposed industrialization. - the process as it is now performed is dangerous and destructive. This is not emotional hyperbole - there is ample hard evidence, it may be that thera are a majority of wells operating without problem, but it needs only one in an area to cause serious harm, and not only to the property owner who gets financial incentives to take the gamble. The DEC's decision to protect the watersheds of selected populations should be more than enough warning that the 'experts' see serious probability Of harm. The industry's Zang advanced preparation to neutralize their culpability for environmental and personal harm, in the form of exemptions from the clean air and clean water acts, speaks volumes about their own expectation of damage - and they ARE experts, not only in changed all of us will pay the price of bringing this industry to our town, quality of life and damaged health, but very directly in the costs to repair the damage d to our roads and bridges, depleated stream discharges, congestion and increased prop �g e from accidents involving heavy machinery and trucks, and who knows what else. Please start us off with what Yittl p�+sition of power we can gain. Changed conditions and/or more knowledge in future can be evaluated and acccmodated through appropriate action and changes to our regulations - disaster first is too late. PA55 714E AMENpPwr TO BAN GAS DRILLING IN THE TOWN OF DRYDEN] Peter A 1 N Sent frog (ip addrSS: 70.196.56.2 (70- 130- 56- .I.dr03,nrwc.nl+;frontiern t,nat) Date /Tirme: duly 28, 2011 1:38 am corning from {referer): httpen.ny.ti+5lcontact -u5 Uzdng (us:er..agent): Mozillal5,0 (iPad; U; CPU US 4-3J like Mat 05 X; enm us) AppiekJebK3It /533.17.9 (KHTMA like 5ecko) Ver~sionl5,6.21 Mobile /RJ2 Safar116533.12.5 4 Mary Ann Sumner From: bob moguire [bmoguire dadtyconnecLwm] Sent: Wednesday, Jijly 27, 2 011 9:94 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject; Support HVHF Ban Dear Ms. Sumner and 'sown Board imembers: 1 am a life -long resident of the Finger Lakes area and recently retired. Mir wife Itady and I live on 100 acres in the town of Dryden. Our property is maintained far wildlife and protected from subdivision by an easement held the by the Finger Lakes Land Trust. We have not leased our land for gas drilling and are vehemently opposed to the introduction of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing in our community. We strongly support a ban and are prepared to pay an increase In property taxes to defend that ban in courvt:. We place a high value on the bucolic nature of our surroundings, our regim thrives on recreation and tourism- related activities. This is no place for heavy industry. MF would cN nge the character of our region forever. Any economic benefit it would bring - and there are clear signs that only a few individuals would benefit - is not worth the environmental risk and the devastation that would result. I know that there are individuals in the community who claim they have a right to exploit the minerals found on their property. if they could do that without any deleterious effect on us, I would have flo problem with them. However, the results of HVHF will reach far beyond the boundary of any one neighbor's property. The increase in truck traffic, npise from drilling and then compressor stations, the release of air -borne pollutants (diesel fumes, methane ventlr�gjflaring) will Impact us all disastrously. Then there are the inevitable.accidents spilled chemjlcals, blowouts, and methane migration. The issue is as much about us being able to enjoy our property undisturbed as it is about someone else's right to drill, Please pass the ban. Respectfully, Bob McGuire and Judy Keil 46 whitted Rd Ithaca 14850 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Nancy Morgan [wink46 @darityConr1ect -QDm1 Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 201112:02 PM 3o; Mary Ann Sumner, Jason Leifer; David Makar, Steve �t�li�k; .loseph Solomon Subject: Ban on Chas Drilling In the Town of Dryden July 27, 2011 Members of the Dryden Town Board, As residents and taxpayers in the Town of Dryden for 37 years, we urge you to vote in favor of a strong gas drilling ban, we simply can't bel love energy company statements vvhIch promise that the utmost care will be taken not to harm our land, water, air and public health. Accidents do happen. And operators can make mistakes or exercise poor judgment. We are concerned for our wall and those of our neighbors, and for the waters in our nearby streams. We are ooncemed abor t roads becoming Irxnpasslble and dar igerouS dine to the enormous increase in truck traffic throughout the town. Air pollution and noise pollution near the drilling sites mould cause health problerrns. Property values would go down drastically, crime and civil disorder would rise_ Many people seem to think there is an infinite supply of water, plenty to spare for hydrofracking as many gas wells as would fit into the landscape here in Dryden, But summer is not yet over and the streams are low, and wellt are actually going dry_ We can't afford to allow billions of gallons of water to b withdrawn permanently from the recharge system for fracking, when we don't even have enough for our own uses. You have done a superb job of studying the issue, weighing tha likely costs and dubious benefits of this type of heavy Industrial use of the land, And In your careful formulation of the zoning ordinance banning such use, we thank you have arrived at the most feasible way to protect the citizens, the tax base, and the natural resources of our town. Tha state government is obviously not interested In what happens locally, but mainly in accommodating the very persuasive energy corporations. The federal govem(ent is glacially slow to act on anything important. Time +s quickly running out for us, and it is essential to Put a barn on gas drilling in place immediately. please pass the ordinance as soon as possible, It is the best mope We all have that our water will not be ruined, our roads will not become a motorist's nightmare, civil disorder will not become the norm in Dryden, our property values will not plunge overnight, and our health wilt net t)e compromised by Industrial pollution right where we live. Thank you, Sincerely, Robert Morgan and Nanny Morgan 11308 Hanshaw Road Ithaca, NY 14850 Town of Dryden i Mary Ann Sumner From: Meg & Eric [ereiff@twcny.rr.com] Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 10:59 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: We support a strong gas drilling ban To whom it May Concern: We are writing In support of a ban on gas drilling, esp Gas drilling will negatively alter both the environment Our house has well- water, and we are very concerned gas lease on the land behind ours. We chose to live in is allowed, Varna will become polluted with noise and hamlet will be lost. acially hydrofracking, in the town of Dryden. We live in Varna. and the quality of life in Dryden (or anywhere for that matter.) with the possibility of contamination, especially since there is a Varna for its beautiful landscape and quiet atmosphere. If drilling traffic from 1,OOOs of trucks passing through. The quality of the Gas drilling and hydrofracking are too big a risk to take, both for environmental reasons and for preserving the quality of life in Dryden. Please don't allow money for a few to spoil life for all of us. Please pass a ban on gas drilling. Thank you, Meghan and Eric Reiff 1243 Dryden Road Ma Ann Sumner From: sasha k -r [darlingisald @g mail .coMI $ent: Wednesday, July 27, 20117:36 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: reIracking ban Dear Members of the Board, I am a Dryden resident, just wanted to add my name to the residents against fracking list. I'm very frightened by the potential aftermath of fracking in my hometown, and i do not want, nor can i afford, to move. We live in such a rich and beautiful place, the risks are too heavy and great to take, know the decision itself is a heavy and political one, but urge you to err on the side of keeping living things safe. Sincerely, SASI IA KELUNER 1 Mary Ann Sumner From. Mike Webster [msw244 @come1l.edu] Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 20116:57 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Support drilling ban 1 am a resident of Dryden (Freeville) living on Midline Road. I strongly support a ban on fracking /drilling in Dryden township. Myfather was a petroleum geologist and in general I actually support responsible resource extractlon. However, it is clear that the fracking process has not been adequately studied or developed, and the potential for negative effects on our local environment and health are too great at this time. Until the extraction industry can provide more information and assurances, fracking should be banned from anyplace near humans, and particular it should be banned in the town of Dryden. Thanks, Mike Webster 298 Midline Road Freeville, NY 13068 I Mary Ann Sumner From: Barb Rogers [bbr48 @lwcny.rr.comj Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 5:45 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject. the ban on gass drilling I know I am joining a chorus..but I have to say from what I've researched and been following this fracking Is a risky business for our water supply and what these sites do to our property is disgusting. I say...ban the drilling. Barbara B Rogers Proud member of www.magicsculpture.com 3 -d model and anatomy resource for sculptors i 71 0 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: July 26, 2011 IWta P Pirsic [rpp4 @cornell.eduj Tuesday, July 2e, 2011 5 :12 PM Mary Ann Sumner Drilling Ban Dear Dryden Supervisor, I beseech you to do what is correct and abandon hydrofracking on all lands. The drilling, the chemicals, the created byproducts and their impact on our fresh water only afford a dire risk to all for many future generations4 What is left after the wells run dry? Earth saturated with a chemical soup having the potential to harm humans, animals, and the environment for generations to come. Many seem to possess the mistaken assumption that gas burns cleanly. It does notl It creates environmental harm as a result of the necessary dirty work to extract it. There are long -term solutions for the nation's energy shortage: (1) energy consumption behavior; (2) solar /wind energy; (3) energy consumption behavior'' I stress energy consumption behavior. I believe energy shortage would be non - existent if we guard our use of the earth's natural resources as well as we carefully guard our hard - earned dollars. It would never be necessary to consider ravaging beautiful land to plunder what lips beneath it. Don't you find it a bit alarming to see what has become of communities that have succumbed to this unconventional form of gas extraction? Hydrofracking in Dryden or any region is a tragedy unfolding. Rita Pirsic 1 Aary Ann Sumner 6bas1@9ma11 .coml Mary gasl [nary From: Tuesday, July 260 201149,45 M 45 P Sent: Mary Ann Sumner To: Hydro fracking Subject: mTnunity that it will ruin kind of liorixontal drilling will be so detrimental to our co ow what I cVas I so believe that allowing Ohig b1e. mineral rights ONLY because I did not know was. I the gentle living here imp Those to say Y was one of the ones that SOn� y crisis and had no idea whlde°did�not know either, they I am sad o t I was helping the nations going to do it'..i suspect mineral right' doing. I thoug OT get big $$$$$$ For our please ban sou ht council from Iny banker and he said ignorant •awe DID g naive and live as we are now. companies carne in here when we were so ig i stole it from us be cause we are naive. 1 want to stay essentia y hydroffracking front our town' ! ! save me from n,Yself! " Mary Bast mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. You are and say what You feel, because those vAho I3ev.h ° y _ Dr. ";Cuss I Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: Dear supervisor, My husband, Robert natural gas in the quiet of the area too great to have to ..r- -- Lois E1ni July 26►��@ 3 50 ►PM u] Mary Ann Sumner in Dryden We favor ban SOON °n gas drfllling SOOM to ban the drilling lies, and Peace e that the Town board will vote suPP acts and i hope that the natural beauty,otential downside impacts tole worry the potential al town. ed. We believe that technology We a is done will be destroy guinea pigs for damal being the g of fixing the area after the us risk the costs shouldering the areao and its run money have left gas and the short this and other issues. Thank you for being willing to deal with Lois and Robert Gosse 1 of and just seem the town and the Mary Ann Sumner �m7�corrtetl.edul Rob Nl y, jut y2ra 2011 3:44 PM From: Tuesday, July Sent: Mary Ann Sumner To: Dryden gas drilling ban Subject: permanent gas drilling ban in Dryden. While I support for a p elling, the wholesale industrial Hello, �Ry STRONG supp as drillun� leas& are comp york because it I am wrung to voice mY New benefits Of People come to live in centra private forests. I've seen realize the potential individual economic, o sense one' every week in our state and p s previously bucolic development of our COmn'un'�yd peen spaces. I recreate e y d Colorado. It transform fresh water, lvania an offers clean air, as development has meant for Pennsoy gestion, and crime follow. firsthand what S - pollution, Reputable studies have shown rhod of time, but rural landscape into industrial settings have been mis- stated• Rep unities for a brief he are worse off ow faster than other a° eneration, Y The broad economic a resource drilling ext action eloped infrastructure that a Ifts of communities that em line after the resource has bee" ea to over deev g p Yes them with no c period of rapid decline ea. They X revenue lea they enter a p le source of ta. than the commu6tses that avoided extractive the Tendanc on a sing merit ulation has to gay for, and economic develop dwindling PO P romising clew' energy' look south to our to our alternatives when that source is remo�'ed. t inethane gas extraction. We need only about drilling er companies that have corn clean abou mutha p rs publish story after story The en erg Local Pape p everything possible to deny have simply lied to us. There is nothing acts °f drilling. companies have done well, whilo lvania to see the tmp pas well ha.5 polluted a drinking , wl"l permanently neighbors in Pennsy and well. worker crones• The y that any �, spills, polluted wells, ollution. They deny between drilling and p rs who cannot drink their water because it has become water; any linkage b individual homeowne clean quietly compensating relatively low cost fart people from far productive resources but will polluted? people, wn of Dryden has enviable n paces resources: a benefit a small number of p p Lo s aces. These timeless but vulnerable resources attra The quiet open p gain that «� beautiful hills and forests; q we must not jeopardize them for a transien g and wide; impact our entire community* Please pass the ban on gas drilling- Thank you, Robert Nlaceurdy 1760 Slate ,ille 0 Ithaca, N-Y I Arlin Surnnor from: Se►�t: To: uWJec #: senArthu�uhlj ��20�����:os�� 7uesdayT Mary Aran SLIM"T rya d0ing In'Me town i am against drilling WW111 the towns than ],ater. ben arLthu erviIl.e rd i76e slat iimits, and feel it I should be banned sooner rather Ann Sumner From: Charles DeMotte [chasjane@earthiink.net] Sent: Tuesday. July 26. 2011 10:11 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Cc: ]edwardsl @frontiemet.not Subject: zoning ordinance on gas drilling in Dryden Dear members of the Dryden Town Board, As a longtime resident of the town of Dryden, I would like to share with you my thoughts about the proposed ordinance against gas drilling in Dryden. First let me say that despite the arguments for and against fracking and gas drilling in general, the question appears to be hoar drilling, and all that entails, will affect the residents of the town ofDryden and our quality of life here. In my opinion it would have a negative impact on both accounts. As you know, we are a region of growth, especially in the western half of the township and also in the vicinity of the villages of Dryden and Freeviile. Given what we know about the extent of impact from fracing and gas drilling, there would be a significant threat to the groundwater that residents depend on for drinking and other uses. second, there are infrastructurai issues such as traffic congestion on our county roads and noise which drilling would bring to our area. Thirdly, there are ample case studies in northern Pennsylvania and in western states where drilling has caused containation of natural resources as well as violating the peace and repose of towns and villages. Fourthly, the recent history of gas and oil drilling has shown that promises of safe drilling have been belied by spills and disasters due to a violation of procedures, mismanagement, and even brazen violations of the law. once you allow outside corporations in, and destruction to the environment to take place, there is no turning back.It should also be pointed out that drilling companies have been less than truthful about the process and effects of hydrofracking. The argument that gas drilling will bring in much needed revenue to the state is a fair one, and there are no doubt suitable places in New York where drilling might be acceptable without causing harm to persons or the environment in general. However, my concern, and I assume yours to, is whether Dryden is such a suitable environment. For the reasons stated above, I think that the logical answer must be ND.I therefore urge you to support a change in the zoning law that would ban fracking in this area. I thank you for all the time and studying this issue. It deliberation. Thank you again. Best wishes, Charles DeMotte 1 Foot Hill Road Freeville and effort you have put into garnering the views of residents is a very important matter and one that needs careful 1 1 Mary Ann Sumner om: Jane Edwards [jedwards1 @frontiernet .net] nt: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 9:35 AM o: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: In favor of a gas drilling ban Dear Town of Dryden Supervisor: I write asking that the Town Board pass a gas drilling ban for the Town of Dryden. Not only will gas drilling change the nature of the community, it will potentially destroy the infrastructure of our built world, ie roads, wells and also the natural world, ie water, plants, trees, animals. Habitat will change. The quality of life will change. Those who benefit in a financial way will also live in a hurt environment. Their short term benefit will bring great suffering to the rest of us. Please consider the long term health and well being of all who live in this town, and vote to ban gas drilling. Many thanks Jane Edwards 1 Foothill Road - shareholder of the Yellow Barn Water Company, which I hope will become part of the Dryden water district. Four wells threatened by surrounding leased land. Over 250 people in danger of bad water, lower property values; just one example of an "entity" threatened by potential gas drilling. IR Mary Ann Sumner From: Jane Edwards gedwards1 @frontiemet.netj Sent; Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:52 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Maker, Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Ste lick Subject: Comment In favor of a gas drilling ban in the Town of Dryden Dear Town of Dryden Supervisor and Board members: Thank you so much for your efforts in hearing the people of the Town of Dryden on the Issue of gas drilling in the community. I know that many people have strong opinions on the matter, and that everyone has a perspective that needs to be considered. I have no leased land and have no expectations of benefitting from such industrial activity in the Town. I see the downside of such industrial activity that will affect those who profit from such activity as well as the rest of us. The influx of corporate drilling will substantially change the nature of our community and may lead to its decline as a healthy community in which to live. The potential danger of water and air pollution, damage to roads, encroachment on lands with pipe laying, potential destruction of our state forests, noise, all suggest actions that should not be allowed. Profit for the international corporations and a few individuals is not a reason to change probably forever our community. I encourage you all to vote to ban such drilling by changing the zoning laws of the town. We are only one town surrounded by other communities and states dealing with these issues. We can be a good example that gives strength to the efforts of others. It is hard to find a "middle ground" with this process. Once allowed, the corporations will follow their own rules. Thank you again for your consideration and time. All good wishes. Jane Edwards 1 Foothill Road Freeville P Ann Sumner Srom. mbarken @ithaca.edu ent, Monday, July 25, 2011 10:11 PM To; Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: Ban on Hydrofracking Dear Supervisor Sumner and Town Board Members, My husband and I attended last week's meeting regarding the proposed ban, and we appreciate the opportunity to add our concerns to the official record. In light of the critical need to protect our water resources for the good of the entire community, we strongly urge you to vote in favor of the proposed ban on hydrofracking. Thank you, Marlene and Fred Barken Mary Ann Sumner From, walter keeney [wkeeneyc@twcny.rr.com] Sent: Saturday, July 23, 2011 1:57 PM 40 To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: fraddrig Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor Gweetings [ leased my small lot needed the money for a new roof. However I wish now that I DID NOT do this. I am concern about my & my neighbor's drinking water. This lease I am afraid will prevent me from selling this property. Thank you, Walter Keeney i Mary Ann Sumner W orom: Bambi Avery nt. Friday, July 22, 2011 9:58 AM : Mary Ann Sumner Subject: FW: I ask the board to pass the proposed ban on gas drilling. Okay, that didn't work the way I thought it would and it turns out there were not as many as I thought..... still burnt out from Cornell I guess. Bawbi L AreiZ' Di)-den 1`0«71 Clerk 93 Easl Maiit tirreet Di)-clen, N*Y I. 3053 607- 34.4 -8888t exi 210 From: Robyn Robinson [mai Ito: rrobin7Cd)twcnv.rr.coml Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2011 7:59 PM To: Bambi Avery Subject: I ask the board to pass the proposed ban on gas drilling. Dear Ms. Avery, I am submitting this comment on the proposed hydrofracking ban by email because I was unable to attend last night's meeting. I ask the board to pass the proposed ban on gas drilling.Thanic you. Sincerely, IWbyn Robinson 75 Ellis Hollow Road I Bambi Avery From: Bambi Avery Sent: Friday, July 22, 2011 9.55 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: FW: In Support of the fracking ban in Dryden MaryAno, Patty said that you had asked to have all comments forwarded to you and you would compile them. Several are below. 13:urn1►i 14. Av ry Dryden rl'c wil Clerl: 93 1,:►st N-1.611 Strec t Dryden, N'Y 130,53 607- $1,445888, cast 210 From: Jason Leifer [mailto:jleifer(@drvden.nv.us1 Sent: Friday, July 22, 20119:02 AM To: Bambi Avery Subject: Fwd: In Support of the fracking ban in Dryden Begin for - warded message: From: Richard Sholtys <.rsholtys6E _gmail,com> Date: July 22, 2011 6:46:51 AM EDT To: <ileifer dryden.ny.us> Subject: In Support of the fracking ban in Dryden Dear Mr, Leifer, 1 strongly support the fracking ban in Dryden. As a 30+ year resident of Dryden, I appreciate the quality of life issues, and while 1 understand the "land rights" arguments of the ban opponents and potential cash windfall it might be for some large land- owners, 1 feel on balance we can't as a society allow the profits for a few to dictate the quality of life and health of the many. As one attendee of the public hearing, near 100 years old, wisely noted "....what good is money. , if you don't have water ?" (sorry I'm paraphrasing). Perhaps it is selfish of me to deny my neighbor the right to drill across the street from me, spoiling my view and peaceful life here, but I could easily imagine my $400,000 house losing half its value- so his financial "gain" would be a direct reduction from my potential home value, so in a broader sense I don't see the financial boon to the town residents. it would take from everyone, regardless of income, and benefit those who typically have larger tracts of land. The reality is a ban does not destroy or take away from the mineral rights of the people- the gas is still there. The ban rightly is on this type of horizontal hydrofrack.ing extraction method which is the concern of the f people. i think it is prudent to take at least a 10 year "wait- and -see" approach to fracking- see who majority b p p P the residents of Pennsylvania experience after all is said and done- before approving any of this type of drilling in NYS. Bans can be reversed. Pollution of my drinking water can not. 7 Thank you for your support of the Ban! 4kegards, Richard Sholtys 9 Sparrow Crest Ithaca, NY (town of Dryden) tel: 607- 220 -8180 Ann Sumner From. a meyerswallen @gmail.com on behalf of Vicki Meyers - Wallen [vnml @comell.edu] Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2011 5:43 PM To: Bambi Avery; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Summary of my statements for submission to the Town Board Please ensure that the following summary of my statements made at the Town Board meeting on July 20, 2011, are included among the documents submitted at that meeting. I was the second speaker. Summary: I am a veterinarian and a scientist who studies birth defects. I have lived here for over 20 years, but before that I lived in several places in the US and overseas. It is clear to me that what we have here We should not take it for granted. I agree with everything that the previous environment and will not repeat that. in Dryden is priceless. speaker (Peter Davies) just said about the I am concerned that hydrofracking in Dryden will ruin our health and our environment. This will affect us, but also our children and our grandchildren. If our health or environment is ruined, it can not be replaced by any amount of money. Can you imagine that any parent would say: Yes, my child was brain damaged because of the hydrofracking chemicals that I ingested when I was pregnant, but we made so much money from hydrofracking that it was worth it. or would any person say: I did not know that hydrofracking chemicals could cause cancer and my spouse did get cancer from, but we made so much money from hydrofracking that it was worth it. Of course no one would say this, because no amount of money could compensate us for such tragedies. The problem with hydrofracking is that there are too many unknowns. It is an ongoing, uncontrolled experiment and we will be the guinea pigs. I am concerned that the adverse effects we have already heard about are just the tip of the iceberg. The wise choice would be to sit on our assets and watch what happens elsewhere, in Pennsylvania for example, where the experiment has already begun. We should watch not only the short term outcomes, but the long term outcomes as well. I support the zoning amendment to ban oil and gas drilling in Dryden. I hope the Dryden Town Board will have the courage to pass this amendment. Vicki Meyers - Wallen 5 Redwood Lane Vicki N. Meyers - Wallen, VMD, PhD, Dipl. ACT Associate Professor, Baker Health, College of veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Hungerford NY,14853 607 256 5683 http://bakerinstitute.vet4cornell.edu/faculty/­ iew.php?id=180 7 Institute for Animal Hill Rd, Ithaca, Mary Ann Sumner �rom: Jennifer Heatley Uheatley twcny,rr,comj ent: Thursday, .duly 21, 2011 4:12 P To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelickr Jason r<e�fer Subject: support far proposed drilling ban Dear Board rnernbers, Unfortunately, I was unable to attend the meeting last night, I am writing to express my support of the pro posed dnilfing ban for Dryden, Perhaps, in the future, If a safe way to extract gas beeornes available, a ban can be lifted, Until such tfrne, we must have the protection of the ban for all residents of Dryden, Thank you all for your attention to this issue. Sincerely, Jennifer Heatley 1321 Ellis Hoflaw Rd, a Mary Ann Sumner From: ,Jill Kellner UkelIner twcny.rr.com] Seat: Thursday, July 21, 2011 2;29 PM 0 To: Mary Ann S umner .Jason Leifer, David Makar; Stephen Stelli ckh Joseph Solomon Subject: franking ban Dear Members of the Board, I attended the meeting last night at the town offices regarding the ban on (racking. I listened for a long time and although it is grievous that the lines are divided, that is often the way 'things are. I know your work is difficult but I think it is absolutely unsafe to f rack, period..''not nova....who knows about the future,...a lot would have to change in the extraction process for me to believe it would do no harm+ Thank you for your diligence. sincerely, Jill Kellner 1321 Ellis Hollow Road R Mary Ann Sumner Imrom: Lam Richmond (Mchmond@twcny_rr.corn] ent: Thursday, July 21, 2DI 1 42:A9 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Steil rk; Jason Leifer Subjed: fracking barn Dear Board members, Althaugh I was in attendance at the meeting last night, I dad riot speak. 1 am writing you to say that I suppOft the proposed drilling ban. I am saddened to see that this issue is dividing our community but I see no way to compromise at this tune, The stakes are too high. Perhaps, in the future, if a safe way to e)dract gas becomes available, our ban can be lifted but, until su& time, we must nave the protection of the ban for all residents of Dryden, Thank you aii for your attention to this issue and for all your work Toward, what must be, a difficult decision. Sincerely, Lam J. RI&rnon 1139 Ellis Hollow Rd. 11 Mary Ann Sumner Fromm. Marie P Read [mpr5@cornell.edu] Sent: Wednesday, July 203 2911 10:33 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen telick; Jason Leifer Subject: Please vote in support of hydro- fracking ban Dear Members of the Town of Dryden Board, Thanks for your hard work over the past months on the issue of horizontal hydro - fracking, and for patiently listening to residents' concerns about this important topic. A5 a Town of Dryden resident, homeowner and property -tax payer for 27 years, 1 urge you to vote in favor of a lean on horizontal hydro - fracking in the Town of Dryden. z live here for the rural, landscape, the peaceful country environment and the abundant wildlife, especially the birdlife, of this region. All these would be profoundly affected if hydro - fracking were allowed to proceed. Our landscape would be forever changed by an influx of what amount to industrial sites. Truck traffic would increase enormously, bringing with it noise and air pollution, and changing our country roads into super highways. Equally important would be the impact an our 'forests, which harbor the birds and other wildlife that many of us enjoy and appreciate. Forest birds are already under threat throughout this country due to habitat lass and degradation. Because of clearing needed to build access roads in addition to the drilling pads themselves, hydra - fracking in forests and wGoded areas contributes to forest fragmentation, one of the main causes of the decline of forest bards such as the Blood Thrush and Scarlet Tanager, Forest fragmentation facilitates access by mammalian predators, which can destroy eggs and young birds, as well as by the is grown- heaved Cowbird, a brood - parasite that lays its eggs in other birds' nests at the expense of their own broods. Allowing hydra - fracking would be dealing yet one more blow to our declining native bird populations. Please vote to help our wildlife survive, and to maintain the rural lifestyle we enjoy here in the Town of Dryden, by supporting this ban. Thanks very much Marie Read Marie Read Wildlife Photography 432 Ringwood Road Freeville NY 13968 USA Phone 607- 539 -5608 e -mail mpr5@corne11.edu httP 0 Zlwww. marieregd.coin Now on FaceBook htt s: www.facebook.com! a es Marie- Read - Wildlife -Photo rah 104356136271727 r It= Ann Sumner From: Sarah Wraight [segwralghtgyahoo,roml Sant: Wednesday, July 20, 20i l O:s9 PM TO: Chary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Steve Staiick; Joseph Solomon; Jason Leifer Subject; Comments on tine Proposed Amendments to the Town of Dryden Zoning ordinance Dear Town Board officials, My name is Sarah Wraight and I live on Redwood Dane_ I attended the. public hearing tonight but was unable to stay late enough to speak, sn I am sending my comsmcnfs to you electromeally. rd like to than& you for your courageous work to protect Dryden froin by&aulic fracturing, I can't say that the debate over natural gas extraction is black and white. However. keep coming back to the question, what will we have whea the gas is ail gone? Gas supplies and royalty checks won't last forever. I went to school in Syracuse, and I spent some time becoming acquainted with its history. That city started its irWustrh d boom with the harvesdias of two non- renewable resources; salt and limestone, By the time that those resources gave out 100 years later, residents were left with environmental disasters of'staggering proportions. The environmental damage to turn harmed the communities in the region's watershed. Tb y're'still struggling to recover, and they will be far many years to come_ It's so easy to say #fat " we know better now_" Yet the tact of the smatter is, the people of Syraou se didn't know what environmental effects their industrial activities would bring, Likewisa, we don't know for sure what hydrofracki ng will bring_ We do know that this industry carries a heavy risk. If it's too risky for Syrnuse wid Nrew York City, I think it s too risky for us, People with wet Is understand the value and the fragility of their water supply. 1- i5tory teaches us what happeros when we don't consider the costs of environmento damage to future generations. History teaches us that it's not hard to mess up the environment, but it's extremely hard to clean it up_ I love living in Dryden. I lave the fact that it's not an industrial landscape, Granted, we have major challenges here, including energy conservation and breaking the fossil fuel addiction. Let's not shoot ourselves frr the proverbial foot by taking on the added burden of this massive envirastrnerrt nsk. Instead, let's work to find sustai to solutions a our problettts_ I really want to find a sustainable way to make a livi �g here. I thank you for drafting this legislation arid for all of your other efforts to ensure that Dryden will always be a healthy place to live. R,esptfuliy, Sarah WI-aight 9 Redwood Lane Ithaca, NY 14850 11 Mary Ann Sumner From: JDhn Allison Kiefer 0ak14 cornell.edul Sent: Wednesday, Ji ly 203 2011 9:46 PM 7o: MW Ann urnner Subject . middle ground on #racking Dear SupeNilsor Sumner, My wife and I listened to this evening's (7120 Board Meeting) proceedings for 2 hours and then had to leave. Perhaps middle ground is to issue a term ban, 5 years perhaps, with a list of environments risks that will be reevaluated In 2016, Until recentky the gas companies have had lit #Ce mativation to seek safe ways to extract shale gas. Let Dryden lead the way In demanding the industry clean If we force a solution. Respectfully, John and Patti Kiefer 0 year residents of 260 Irish Settlement Road Freeville, NY 13068 944-9343 up its act. My guess is that the medium and long term risks will be solved — but only improving the "resolution in Support of Mop ng Amendmenbi to the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance Clarifying the Town's Pruhibition of Naturat Cas Exploration and Extraction" received from S tipervisor glary Anti Su mucr by email, June'7, 2011 From: Joseph M. Wilson, T) ryden resident living tit 75 Hunt bill Rind Date: Jul�� 11, 2011 Three of the "WI)ereas" paragraphs can be improved by uSiric information From competent, independent sources. As each paragraph reads nonv, the statement and j ustification for the 1) an of "'frocking" is equivocal. This equlvoeation makes the Resolution and, therefore, the ban amendment itself less defensible than 1C can otherwise be. �. Resolution paragraph no. 1S reads: "There is a continuing open debate concerning the environ)nental and health effects of nattiral gas exploration and extracl,ion." The negative health and environmental effects of natural gas extraction (Le, Frackinb) are well knnwu and well documented. Below a re competent, disinterested statements and authorities to that e (Tee C. They should be relied on ire rc- drafting the RcsaIitti0n, (Sec pages 1 -G below.) A . I esolution of the Medical Society of the State of New Fork: "RESOLVED, I'ha( the Medical Society of Che Sate of New York supports a moratorium On natural gas extraction using;11igh vol urne hydrauIic Cractud rig in New York Bride unti I valid information is available to evaluate the process for its potential efT"ls on huinan health and the environment,„ Counties tl�91 passed their own calls for s inoratoriurn include: Brow nc County Medical Society: Herkimer C OL1nl.y Medical Society_ Cayuga County Medical Sociel}, Crhernung County Medical Society, cllena11�0 Count] + Medical Society, Madison County MedicA Society, Oneida County Medical Society, Onondaga CrounLy Medical Society, Os} -logo County Medical Society, Wgn:,o County Medical Sociely, and `rampkins C OLumy Medical Society, The DE;lziwv re and Tioga COLInlieS Flo not have se- parate Socicries I}lit fall Under vlkil is called the si %1h District Whic.111 also declared support for a 1noraia)ri urn. l- ocieRetrlcv 7 /10 /1 l fi'on http: // claec.word iess.onm12010112J1Qrnew- ork- sute - medica 'ties_ C'9 I I- for- inoratoriuml H. Resolution by the NleciicaI Society of Tompkins County: (Ju ne 2010) "Physicians of Tompkins [county care Frst and foremost about the hea Ith o C our community. When an activity raises potential harm to human health, precautionary measures shou Id be taken until CaUsce and effect relationships are fully established scientifically_ `:The ex 1) 1 o itat i o n of natural gas in [he Marcel lus shale inveIves high- pressure i iii u( rion of over 200 billion of gallons of water and [gill ions of gallons of water - soluble ohemIcals into the shale formations to aIIow the release of natural ,gas. Backf] ow from this process contains heavy metals, radioactive materials and voIat] I organ is GQMP0LLndsI I`he effects of this process on hulnan health 11ave not been subject to rlgoroLis medical research. The review reported by the N caw York State DepaLtment of Environmental Conservation in the draft Su ppleinentx[ Generic Environmental Iinpact Statement contains no high quality medical data. "W h support a moratorium to natural gas extraction using 11 igh volume hydrauI is Fracturing 1n New York State LL]It] l coulplet]ort 0Ftlrc recently announced Envii- onmcntaI Prol cot ion Agency (EPA) study to evalLLate its effects on himlan Ileall:h and the environment. Provided by the Medical Soc Icty of ToirL1>kins County through Sixth J7istrict LMedicaI Societies, Executive T)irector; Cyii thix Burf er, CAE" at medsoc i e tv(.i n also e i et ies_n rg, . Specific stir pollutants rare produced by y� !''ricking. [On all electronic cop} o[' this IF101n0, one can click tin each cacogory ro read details abOLIr the pollutant or the source activity, 2, I1, 'x' means I11t7i a pollutant is 01 Eli Ited as a direct resulr of the porticLUlar activity 'am means thtlI Ilse pollutant i5 gatierated in a secondary rcacliui i osociatcd with tlto pankuIkir pit and gas &w lopment solivity, Theime fare siguificsant, negative effects on Kalman health :xssociawd TMth this air pollution. The FPA labels flee criteria pollutants Ilste� In Paragraph A HA P's, VOOs, BT EX, and n- 11exall0 as each balm; dangerous to human health and the environment, In a to- bc- mpubltshed study released 1 ValthworcP7 Oil and Gns Accoual Fib i lity k'rojcal, :`0i] and Gas Air Pollution.:` retrieved 2!9111 fim 17tt 'llwxvsx'.ea€tll ;4' ROCIIQJ1' i1�'3S311 I FLio3s "cfm ' F,PA: " Outdour Air- Industry, 13US111 ss, and Homc; Oil and Naltirml Gas ProdudionmAdditionul 131fOnMdiolL: ret CVc+J 2x`2311 L rrc}In all'lAw' 1 w'.c vloac 1lctslnmur "]. rdctaila+ adcll yr "httnl 4,enxaoum Vphid F1 And �&gltles eL K x X ivtl ogen 5u[Fldc X x Ozon p O O }( x Eb[4O.en X x X x X. x er�x x w 2$NS x y x A 'x' means I11t7i a pollutant is 01 Eli Ited as a direct resulr of the porticLUlar activity 'am means thtlI Ilse pollutant i5 gatierated in a secondary rcacliui i osociatcd with tlto pankuIkir pit and gas &w lopment solivity, Theime fare siguificsant, negative effects on Kalman health :xssociawd TMth this air pollution. The FPA labels flee criteria pollutants Ilste� In Paragraph A HA P's, VOOs, BT EX, and n- 11exall0 as each balm; dangerous to human health and the environment, In a to- bc- mpubltshed study released 1 ValthworcP7 Oil and Gns Accoual Fib i lity k'rojcal, :`0i] and Gas Air Pollution.:` retrieved 2!9111 fim 17tt 'llwxvsx'.ea€tll ;4' ROCIIQJ1' i1�'3S311 I FLio3s "cfm ' F,PA: " Outdour Air- Industry, 13US111 ss, and Homc; Oil and Naltirml Gas ProdudionmAdditionul 131fOnMdiolL: ret CVc+J 2x`2311 L rrc}In all'lAw' 1 w'.c vloac 1lctslnmur "]. rdctaila+ adcll yr "httnl September 2010, Dr. Theo Co ihnrn studied 9 8 pnoduct; used in natural gas production. He found that 9 0 percent of them were. associated with n egative Health of e;ts.3 (8cc also, "I" -1 -'° below,) Immediate reactions to a i r pol lutants are called ",9 cute. effects ,'° Acute effects associated with Frackinon include in-itations of skill, eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, headaches, dimness, nausea, vomiting, rashes, elevated tcnsio n, negative personality changes, depression, confusion, muscle cramps, irregular heartbeat, Ede- occurring and longer -term reactions are labeled "chronic effects." Chronic effects associated with air pollution from fracking include daLnage to [Iver, kidneys, lun&s, developing feVuses, atld nerves, Additional fhronic effects inc[ude: reproductive system damage, damage to the nervous system iliduding the brain, cancers, neg<'ttive changes to blood, leukemia, aplastif anemia, and dfvdopmental malformations., 5 F. Osic cannot avoid the regative effects of t1iis poll lion. Eye ryone in tl,c vicinity o Fraicidng w'I.1 be affected to so greater or lesser degree. "When the air in your envii-orJmerlt is contarnprtated, YOU lutomatical ly [are affected by] the contaminants,,-c ]n addition to preaching polluted air, one can be exposed by eating air-contanlinated food products, drinking water contain i n ated by polluted air, and by putting cc) ntaininated soil into one's mouth.' What determines the negative impact is the amount of exposure, one's susceptibility to thc. part ieuIar poI[utants; one's age, and one's heralth -2 F. Additional Ncumontation ire. Negative Health EtTects of Fracking Caused Air Pollution'. 1. Natural Geis Operations from a Public Health Pcrspectivc , Theo C olborn, Carol Kwiatkowski, Kim ,Scholia, andWayy Rachijau, 7 EDX, 1 he Endocrine Disruplion Exchange. Paoniu, CO, USAmwIN.PRTS.S,• dccepeed for pubficariorl Irn llle hiternalional Journal of A(unian and rocological Risk Assessnionf, ,Selr /ernberW, 2010. Eyj)ocledpublication. S'epr'ember- Octabor 0111 "C]S2n7iCa]S in NaLLtral Gus OperaLiniss, °' "4uLSSOr2yy Statemeas(::' Retrieved 2!20+'11 froth Ljgq, + "+ 4', ndocrinedisrtiptionc & aI1ILL€lir,, mimry1-27-11FIrl Irpclf1 5v4 siIso, :`Natural Gas Operations Isom H PtLblia FIL! Ldth 1ker5pC 6VQ," September 2010, by Thep Colbon) 1% CnTol K%yialkr{ u'Ski, Kurt SchulL•r, Mary Rachran, reLri, tiVahle IiYnTL 13 ]O.)df- ° WIJma Subs, "Community Air Monitoring,:' a lecture and Povr%er Point pitsentation at the People's Gas and Oil Summit: Pittsburgh, Novcmbcr 19 & 20, 2010. T,lk and Slides reLdovablc from Li tp IZCnnsyivania,sierraclub, r>?lm shannonr'sh #Ile asL'CTFs1L'>xncU ilrrta,ub�a= HcalthS.0 cys r n>`T LY,ptiFForasLFn F1 list FvVkLSCd on Lhc hcalLh cffcats of =iticd HA.P's, VOCs, BTEX, and n- huNnnc, see EPA, "Ouldavr Air- Tndusfry, businum, and Horne; Oil and NlaturalC aSPniduction- AddiLionallnf {mnaLioin, "rt:Lrieved2/2$jll From liIWlhvmv. vpu-i lovZnir iommin Lin ityif lei niWjl -13sis, , See Dr. Colbora's Excel spreadsheet sunimari5l iaL chemicals, heal L11 efl-ea.q. aLLd scone Precautiprus that can he taken at ] slur:,'' lv, sv3 v. endJncrinnilisruPtic�n- ulmlchrrrLic:als.mu![iSlxtc,R� - ° 1 iln,a Subra "Community Air Monitor[ng,`° a Iccture and Pov.^er J'aiIII preseutation by at the People's Gas aiuJ Oil Summit, Pituburgh, 14micinbe, 19& 207 2010, neLrievable fimrr ]11t0'llpenru541 +' ante - Bier, �LCILtb- urLlrensl�annin�lsliale�tilPDPslPsinc !I WilmnSiihra- 7 F]3 A. "AbOUL Air Toxics,:' retrieved 2121 11 1 Jr4tm 0xic:Lir /T1ff �toxics,hiMI. Sco also EI'A, "Air Pollution Emissions ( erview, mt'Leved 219111 from IiLu )!;f;wvnk- epa.GovlairaaaliLyAe_ rissus.htcnl. 6 EPA, "Air Emission Sourccs, Basic JLlfonnatl611ii'retrieved nI /I I from IltEp'+ l+ �xn4- opa. �ovfairre�nissinnsrh7sie- Istn,�rl�tnioc, 3 "ABSTRACT; The technoloa }' to rec0%T1' 11atI_ua1 Lirx� depcnds on undisclosed types and amounis of toxic cheillicals_ A list of 944 products containing 632 chemicals used during naturrll gas 0paration5 was. compiled. Literature searches were conducted to determine potential health effects of the 353 chemicals identified by Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) nLimbers. More than 75% of the cherri.M9Is could affect the skin. eyes, and other sensory organs, and the respinitory and ustmintestinal systems, Approxiill ate ly d0 -50% could aiffcct the brain /nervous system, immune and cardiovascular Vstems, and the kidneys; 370/0 could affect i:lle endocrine system; and 25% co41.1tl ciIuse cancer and mutatiolls. "These results ilidicate that many chemicals used during the fracturing and JriIIinri singcs of ,gas operations may hcive Ion g -term 11eaIth eM *ts that are not immediate[y expressed_ ]n addition, an axample was provided of waste evaporation pit resi d u Is that contained roumerous chemicals Oil the ER LA all 13PCRA lists of hazardous Substalces. The LIISCKMSSioll higJllights the diFficultyofdeve] oping eF)"ective a.tcrduality monitoring programs_ To protect public health w }' recommend full disclosure ol'the cojite.nts ofaII prOdI-Irts, extensive air and %eater molliiwing, coordinated eilviranmentaliliu Ill an health studies, end reguIation of rracturing uridor the U_S. Safe DrInkirntr Water Act_" 2. Air PtiIIut]011 from rrtiokin A Harms i -Tea Ith: A D etor's key 1c % %v of the Research 9/2W. Hydraulic Fracluring ,S'rudy- om menIs (o tha 6_1eA, Eric London, MR S'oploenber' ?7, 20} 0, Written by a J)lJysician and researcher, this Iefter asks th e Ll'A to inclucic air pol lul.iol3 Offivcts in its hydr�ulic fracturing study, Much of its six pages is devoted to imeviewing the research data showing that hydraulic CraOuring releases into the air mane chemicals that have been proved to damage human health. The author describes in ckinil the evidenee that hydim 111c frRC401ipg operations create dangerous levels of hydrogen suIfide and o2.one; lie then ciife; data on their adverse effects on health_ I-le a] so discusses part. iculate platter, ltitroge11 oxides, %'olatile organic e0111J)0Lp1d5 (VOCE), and polycycGc arnmtftic hydrocarbons (PA I•I), and their sources and effects on health_ Frocking - related air pollution can ca4ise respiratory ailmo�lts, brain damage, cancer, higher infant modality rates, low birth weight, piLernaturity, grnwth retardation, birth defects, and a host of other health problems_ London says that "Despite the overwhelming evidence of mortality, i11 nosy, and adverse birth outcome correlating with air pollution there is a shocking compIacel)cy nn the part of inost rcgu fators, policy inakers and pledict71 professionals, if si111iC�u n�aml�crs of subjects 'ere killed or sicJcened from infectious diseases_ it would be declared a nationa[ emergency. -' 3_ Hoiry Air Pollution Affects HegIth Near HighwTraf]<ic Areas 612003 "Key �turfI. oil Air Pollution all I -Tea lt'h .Lffects Dear High- Traffic Areas," Compiled by tho Environmental Law and Policy Confer and the S'ierm Club. San Diego Tdr1h times. June 2003_ This 1' eb range includes citations all brief (less than NO words) synopses Of 15 journal articles on t1lc health eff ects of hviiag near 11eavy traf ic. The stud ics indicate tl7a #. J eople ] iving ncaJ` busy 4 roads die sooner, have more childhood asthma hospitalizations and more as#7lma generally, are in ore IikcIy to have 1)remaLure and I o w- birth-wei ght babies, have much greater exposure to particle pallutioP), and are more I ikely to have childhood and adult cancer. A re33nan stud+ found that over a l ifetime, traffic- related air pollution was more I ikely to ki11 people than was motor ve]]lcle accidents. A short, easy -to -read sunvnary of fairly recent research_ G. The noises associated with Fraeldng cause negative effects on humans and animitts: I;Ncte,. One e.st�ablishcd result of during drilling, Current practice Compressor stations are powers hunizins and animals in the vici« widespread shale gas extraction is a huge increase in truck traffic ca4ises this traffic to continue 24 hours a day, 7 clays a wwk_ :l by locomotive style engines which also operate 23 -7. As a result, ity experience dramatically increased levels of noise.) 11 Traffic Noise [ncreases 1&[ypertension (12/11/2 007) {4Hypertension and Exposure to Nloise Near Airports: The HYENA Study." Lars Jrarup, Wea rang B bfsch, Danny Houthui s, el al. Environmental Health Perspectives. 116-1 329- 333. Online December ]11 2007. Hypertealsion (hIC1h blood pressure) is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. This 1� study' examined the rela(ioa� ship betw"n h l) extension and noise from trade and aircraft. The study looked at 45861 people 45 to 70 years old who had lived near a major airport for at leas( 5 yea rs.131ood pressure wag assessed three times, Li ne( standard methods were used to measure road traffic a7oise. The study found a statistically significant positive relationship bet eci3 exposure to daily road traffic noise and blood pressure, especially for men. Traffic noise, their, may be a risk factor in heart attae-ks and strokes and contribute to cdrdiovaScular disease, "17le authors suggest that inc asures to reduce road traffic noise be considered_ [Mote. The expected noise from truce traffic related to hydraul is Frac('4iring is relevant to the gas dri llinL4 issue, so i.h is s4uninairy focuses on that aspect of (h(, study.] 2. Noise. Even J)uriai.i?) S Increases Stress and the Release of-Stress 1- oilinones 2( 003) "Stress Mormones in the Research on Cardiovascular Effec-ts of Moire_" Jfi Bahisclr_ AlojUe & AY olfh -m R Quarterly fiver- disciphnaryL7ternatu qOl JOUrrtal. 5() 8)'1 -11. 2003_ el Iii s research review' of over a hi -mdred scientific papers lays out the evidence that not sc causes stress, oven when we are asleep, and that increased stress may, over the Ioncr t,erin, result in cardiovascular disease. TOise, even low- le►�el (rafliC noise, appears to cause the release ofa variety of stress- hormones 1n[o the blood, wb ich havw effects on the body that are known to increase the risk of card lovmcufar disease, Stress hormones inc -rease the heart rate, blood pressure, all retention of fluid by the Iddneys, and cause the body to ready energy �qnrl oxygen reserves. The author nolts that " tprrent noise reseaml7 in greaieral, does not need to prove any longer the iioiseJstress hypothesis as such. it is common knowledge that noise is a psycho-social stressor that can affect physiological ftinc1:lon ing." The refcrcnces include many studies of noise of Pests From diffi♦yrent sources on various human pliye;ivlogical systems. 3. "The Costs of Chronic Noise Exposure for rfeares(rial Organisms." Jesse R Barber, Kuv n Rr Crooks, and Kiel M. Frlso up. Trends in Ecology & Evolutio:i. 25(3), .180 —.1 89. zSeprembar .T6, 2009_ 3 1"his review article doctumcnts that chronic noise, from resource extraction and many other sources, is a threat to the world's ecosystems, increased lioisi�, much of it From incrnsed road and air tittfYic, masks sounds that animals would otherwisc use as environmental cues to locate prey, avoid predators, and find tliates. Loud, persistent noise actually restructures animitI cornrnull Iti�s - Some studies hitVe found that birds near noisy coili pressor stations were less successful than those farther away. J "i7ogs in noisy environments in ay have less ability to locate elates. The extent Co which hunlan- caused noise: iiifluencos species depends in part Oil the overlap beLWeern lhc1 sound Frequencies (wavelengths) and the frequencies relevant to the speCIts. Study cvideaticc indicates that iJuise pollution worsens problems caused by habitat fix rr�ei�taCion tttid other Coll sequenc -es oFfitiman activities. The authors suggest that we should take "iInmediate action ro rnaila c noise in protected iiauiral area.;," 4. Com pimecsor Station \raise Rgduces Qven bird Pxirina SLIGCeSS {20 0 J7 "Chron is Industrial Noise Affects Pairing Success alld Age Structure of Ovwnbinds eitGrtis aurocapiIla." Lai is Hub ib, trig ,V Bayne. amel,Sran Boutin, Jo?Y)701 of Applied EcoTu y, 441• 176 -154. 200'?, In Alberta, Canada, the authors colbpare.d pairing sticcwss and age structure. of ovenbirds aC noisy natural -gas compressor stations to quite norby wel l pad sites with .Similar degrees of habitat disturhance. T'hev fbl end a "signi�fic ant reduction in ovenbird pairing success at compressor sites (77 %) compared with noiseless well pads (?° /n)- ....signi ican ly more inexperienced birds breeding for the first tirne were found near noisc�generatina compressor stations flian noiseless well pads (48% vs. ) I1 %}1 .,,tT]he ultimate cause oFthe changes seeil,s to be noise pOIILPtIO11 " 5. Son 2b ird Deli sii. + is Lower Near Com pressor SIal.ioils 20 ` Trnpacts of Chronic Anthropoge�nic Toile li`onl Energy-So cCur Activity on Abcr,ldance of Songbirds in the Boreal Forest." Erin rig: Bgyno, L-tecas Habib, Ernst Stan Boutin. Conser vafion Bio(ogy. 22.1 1186E 1193- 2008. In a Ca nadian boreal forest, the authors investigated total songbird density and density of uldrVifial species rear nulsy compressor statiols and netn`by quiet JVeI] pads, They Found that total songbird density vras 33)% lower at the noisy sites tkan at the quiet sites. Densities of three. species were signiFicantly lower a the conll)re.ssor siai:ions sites than atsinliltu gtliet sites, and rive species wore less likely to occur near c01tipPessor stations i:han Ott the quiet well pads. 6. iNoise reduces eciL;s I�ichtless and Clean es Species ]'nter{tctions 20091 "iLq01Se Pollution Chaiige.s Avian ComIT1L11]ltI and Spccl[ps i.nl:eractions," C. DL FrancEs, C. P- 0rtega; A. CrU •L. Current 3iolony- 19: 1415- 1419.2009. This study, conducted in pinyon-.juniper woodkinds in northwestern New Mexico, studied species composition and interactions at sil;es near active natural &i3 compressor stations find at similar but quiet wel I pads nearby. They Found that "noise alone reduces nesting species richness and leads to d1Fferent ;avian communities," and suggest (hat. "noise can have casctlding consequences for cnnlin till itics through altered species interactions -" i�. Frackirig Threatens treams rind Agnsttic Life, Even with No Spills or Leaks 101121/0 "PhilIly Academy Study Finds Gas Drilling -I- hreatons Strearrls -" �5arrcf} Romers. 1'hHadelphiu Inquirer, October 12) 010, Th is article describes it preliminary study of Pen nsylVan is streams, which suggests that a high density of drill i i l m the arctlltls Ilale 111 a.v degrade rLearby stret nls r, even it'there at-c no spills or other accidents. The study !'ou11d that water Gonducti� ity, tin iriclicator of salt contamination, was twice as higll in streams near high- de.n,sity drill ing, and populations of salamanders {nod aquatic ittsects, two groups of anima is sensitive to pot luiioly, were 5 percent lower, [Note that many fish Feed on aquatic insects -,I results of Lhe preliminary study, 6 conducted by the Academy of Nlatunal Sciences, will be uscd to apply fcrr IundinQ for a larger, more comprehensive stud }'_ 'David Velinsky, Vl} of the Aca&iny+'s Patrick Center for Environmental E eF�earch, is quoted In the article as saying that he knew of no simi lar stud ies that had been completed, The article notes that, as of Oct. 1, 2010, the nuinber of Marce.l1us weIIs drilled in PennsyI.van is is 2,2.37, wet there have been iio indepcsident studies of their ecological consequences for streams; scientists are just now applying for funding for such studies_ 0 Sept_ 2.3, 2010. Velinsky testified beFore joint committees of the Philadelphia City Cnulicil on the effects of Ma [cc 11us shale drilling on aquatic and terrestrial ecosy',stems. His remarks 1neILLded a discu m a ssion of the preliinary strem study_ VeIiasky's testimony is archived at, hrtp .Hwwiv_ans i_orglxborithigwsl,] df /David Wlinsky QiKouncjffesthnopiy 2010-09-239 pd 11. Resolution paragraph nu. 22 rends: "... the potential adverse impacts associated with natural gas exploration, extraction, treatrrMent, storage, and transportation MAY threateu the economie future of town residentq and taxpayers and their gtia I'd y of life ... " [CAPS add edI There is competent doeuuieutation by di 5interested authorities establishing that Fi9acking harms the duality oFIife and economies of small rural towns like Dryden. The economy, property values, and daily lives of the gremat majority of Dryden :wesidents will be negativeiv Affected by Fracking. Local governments suelk as Dryden's and that of Tom pkiei5 County lack the resources with whic11 to successfully cape with the cumulative eBViron rrletital, health, social., and economic effects of Fraelding. There is no system for causing .li rackers to pay or reimburse local governments for the cost they will incur to address these efFect5. This documentation should be used in red rafting the Resolution. (Sec pages 7 -10 below.) A. Figacking i5 already affecting Tompkins County. The State is not acting to mitigate these offects. Lansing Star•, "Cornet l Expert Say d. 1 °[ }'drofacking Already Affecting Now York," Friday, June 24, 201 ] 00;00 by —Staff ' Eco,iom is Geographer Susan Christopherson, of Comel I's Npartment of City and Regional Planting, has been studying the economic effects of hydrofracki ng, looking at the experience iil nearby Pennsylvania and effects in New York. Since there is "no border fence between New York an d [Iennsylvania,` she said, dril l ing produces a regional industria] effect, and cautioned then wil l be "important impacts to Tompkins County=' —from such aspects as heavy truck tr°dffic, �k�ater resources, and waste disposal— even if a single we] I. is not drilled here. She inaintairrcJ Mate officials aime shoving" illfuI ignorance and disinterest'° in failing to address those 2s4Ges and, because of that, the state is tin prepared , Retrieved 711 011 1 From httn'1 Iww w. 1ansingstar .comineWs- paLze17420- cornell.- ax. pert- says- hydrefackin Ljr- alreadv- xffectirtg- new - ;Fork 13. Gits and Oil Leases Cause a Negative Impact on lWidential Lcnding— Excerpt fro statement made by Greg May, VP — Residential Mortgage Lending; Tompkins Trust Company, March 24, 201 1 1. 'There is not a cost effective or reliable way to determine i1' a rcesidcrAaI property has a 7 gas ]ease to aIIa%v an Appraiser to establish an appraised va] ue. `Tit[e examinations of each property would add significant cost to each transaction in NYS, 11D 2" Surfia"c or sub surface rights twifhin 200 Feet of a residential structure would not be acceptable fior conventi oil a] linancincr is the Secondary market. 3" NTY d insurance gas. endorsements specifically void title insurance. coverage if the premises are used for Lilly commercial venture, 4. Lenders are responsible to warrant several items to the irnvestor in the Secondary market that can not be done leaving [eiders with significant liability. 5, N Y S [icunsed Appraisers are not able to consider I.hc im 1) act on valuc if a gas lease exists as noted it item #1 above and hence their Appraisals %+could not meet Secondary market regtri cements" , -Surf -Rce. or sub stsrface rights within 300 feet of a residential stri-ictt1rc 0 R within 300 foci. of property bo4mdary lines would not he acceptable Cor I'hlA (Department of HTTD� financing. Retrieved from 711011.1 htt : ?linnoval:i Q ntrai1.or dyp osV lease -Fine- rint -im pwgsm homo- Inans. See also= 1lUp:/Ayx4rw,1g m.l3kins- co= n ;'tcco IC�a 3'i[lin }Focl.]s� roupslT.a� d values Asses mai3t,l�tm1 C. The Cumulative F..Ffects of Fraeking Threaten Serioris.Damagc to ToWrism: "] IltLI]'a] Cias 1`I j11]7g [LI L11C 1vlarcell�ls ShIl[e: I'4l'el�tI I1��p acts On the TOLn"iSM FC0110111Y Of the Southern Tier," TC: Reepional Planning &. Development Bo l J, info z sIc IanniII -orr t= ;n i �' o seriuus daina a to the tour]Sin [Tl7c cu effects of ide spread gas dn[I]n�I threaten to d g sector by dcclrad131g visitor experiences and crcadng an i11 dLIStrial lanclsc -tpe that far outlives the profi tab il ity of gas extmotion." 1), LO retrieved W9/1 1 from http:! /W Lr %kr- stcp[anriin "arulirip? pafreld=195 D. Farmland is Damaged by Fracking T], e. lAague 0C WolnQ-n Voters of Pennsylvania MarceIfus Sh fie ;Vadij+•Crj Gas Exarocdon .Study, 2009 - 201�1, ,S1u(ly (-guide #I, rldcTrc�ellvs �S'Taole �' alural Gas, #��al�rrofiV?J JJ71c�f f�+f�7crcI. p, � "Whei1 heavy driIIino and fracking Nuipment travels over farm [all d, soil compaction occurs, Thwre are two types of soil compaction, First, topsoil co331p ici:io33 is caused by tiro pi-ensure, and this can severely reduce plait production in the short term, Second, subsoil compaction is caused by axle loads which reduce productir�il }' for decades and cannot be a] [ev Iated over i:ime by any natural ineinS (Grafton County Conservation Llistrict, n.d.), It results in decreased soil percolation and incruased soil run off, 'Phis, in turn, treads to less rrokvtll of �rggu ation and more soil erosion. (}na mi8ht compare topsoi l compaction to a bicy % I e rider or car riding at a uniform speed across the a well - drained lawn and subsoil compact Loll to a fully loaded cell-Lent mixer driving across a lawn 8 immediately after a heavy ra infal I_ The first creates tread marks whi1e the second creates ruts that will not be alleviated by time alone_;' E. Ozatke is produced by Fracking and Ozune Damages Crops: 1. "Efcots of Ozone Alt Poll ution on Plants," Agricultural Research o5`ervice, G'.,5'_ Department of Agriculture. Arliclo last modified November 6, 2010- This is a brief, huavily illustrated, easy- to- 4uiderstand accormt of how ozone harms crops, .it states that "Ground level o7A)ne causes mare damage to plants than rill other air pol Iuinnis comb111ed." Amer describing thf, sources of ozone. the article explains when and where, (with a map) it is most likely to occur in the 'U,. Symptoms of leaf damage by ozone include stippling, flecking, bronzing, and reddenirng. Yield losses due to ozone are greatest on dicot plants such as cotton, peanuts; and soybeans, and log {per on monocot specks such as winter wheat, lield corn, and sorghum. Researc17 papers are cited in the references, 2. -'The Drone Component of Global Change: Potential )effects on Agricultural and Horticultural Plant Yield, Product Quality, and Interactions with Invasive Species." Fitzgerald Booker, Rias'all Muni� fcjjl gr -Margared McGrash, et al. Journal o f Integradi ve !Tarot BioloSy..51(4); 337 -35.7. 2009. This scientific journal article documents that many agricultural and horticultural crops are harmed by ground -level ozone, an air pul lu (an t. It typical ly reduces photosynthesis. speeds aging, decreases growth, and Ioive.rs yields, A [thou ;h ozone's effect; vary in different crops, in different varieties of the same crop, and front year to year, the research shop rs that iii sensitive plants, yield losses range from 5% to 15%- In grapes, it can injure leaves, reduce fru it ,si7a, and increase acidity, Other sensitive species include alfalfa, beans, clover and other forage crops, cotton, leitucc, oats, peanuts, potatoes, rape, rice, soybeans, spinach, obacco, tomatoes, watermelons, and wheat. Climate models suggest that upisodes of high ground -level ozone will become more ca ill mon drn -irig the growing season in regions such as the northeast US. F. Fracking Traffic De�ilrays Dural Roads and the Dust Created Reduces Air Q uaIitV Randall, C.I. 2010_ i Hammer Down: A Crude to Pro Leal rig Local Roads Impacted by Shale (gas Drilling." Working Paper Series for A Comprehensive Bconomic hnpact Analysis of Natural Gas Exlr aclfoq in Me ) rarceflvs Shale) Cornell University Department of Cily and Regional Planning. Available at; htl. p;N greencholees_ corrnell_ edu ldeveloprnent/marceIIuslpolic f "Dust, rioise, and road damage from industry truck travel are tops on the l ist of citizen complaints in areas where gas is a tincted via shale gas drilling. A typica-1 Mamellus well requires S.6 million gallons of water durinc the drill in process, in alinost al I cases del ivered by truck. liquid additives are shipped to the wet l site in federal DOT- approved plastic 0 containers on flatbed trucks; hydrochloric acid and water are delivered — and flowback is haLLled away — 111 (a11Icer trucks, M iIIion.5 of gal Ions of Iigtiid used in the short (woeks -long) initial drilling period account foil halfoFthe estunated 890 to 1340 trucicIOnds regaired per W(;;] I site, BV cause of its weight, the impact of � +Miter hauled to one site (3 64 trips) is the equ i valent of neap Iy 3. � n 119 on car trips. Few roads at the town I eve I in New York Slate have been built to withstand this volume of licavy of truck traffic -" The League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania Marcefluy ,Shale Nolural Cos Ex1racfion rud e, 2009 -2010, Study Guide 11, Marcellus Shale Nalural Gas' Environn2onfal Impod, p- 10 Heavy tMoks cause potholes and break pavement; especially along tho edges. Heavy trucks on gravel roads raise enough dust to change air quality. ;See also ° °l l af�c Studies" below 11 f:. Fracking catises rent, to skyroe[tet 4um0(ii11eS With ucauti►e SpCial consequences: "Bradford CoLn}t }l Placing i is i,7 ] 4oster Care Due to HotLsing Shortage,` Jaen Y.57 Lowenssein, The Dady Rev�e4ij (Towanda, PA). July 29, 20101 `Phis article notes that six children had to be separated Fronn their I:amilies and plt,ced in foster care i11 the past year because their families were evicted and 11U 111cxpe119 n+e 110L19Lrlg was aval lab Ic to leccorn mod ate the entire. fall iIv, There's cuiTently it shortage of affordable 1101sing local [y because 9 rnany landlords hove increased rents to profit from t11e. relatively high wages paid to gas industry workers. 'Clio article says "the l)[ooements appear to represent at least tlic becrinning of a new trend." Thff aiticle impl ies 1.11 at the high wages are going to large numbeiLs of outsiders, not local people. Tle co111ments following the articles illustrate the divisiveness (ill c l.n follow when a community faces an influx of gas extraction workers, They include statements of shock and disappointment that local people who have lived in the community their whole; Ilvcs are priced out of the nlarket; of anger with la11d1ords (i11c1udirlg a coinplainI by a woman � +rhosc €lu9 ban d works in the gas'I ndustiy that they, too; are all 11appy about ray n the "absurd" $ 1500 rent), and of Rears that the ytpest 1-6r short -term J1ro fits for a few toil] result in Iongater111 danlage too thPe entire curnmun it} . H. Fraacking produces more crime, more emergencies, and greater net for related cervices. Taft. P -13 -, (1981) Keeping the Peace in lbe New 1�rlid West, Police agaztne ol. 4 (4)L) 1rd_M(3u1y 199I)Pages.8 -15, 17. 0 i I and Energy News, May 24, 2010, I arrisburg, ?A, FRNews ire- USNews wire "Public Heall:ll implications For l!t rceIILLs ShaIc DevuIopnnent" Charles Christen; Drl'H,M.ed, Cull (or for Healthy Environments wld Coll, muuities U'rliversity of FIvsburgl1 Graduate School ofPublic Health, AUgLISt 27, 20 10 retriaved 711 I.JI 1 from lIttp' 1 }v.w. Alec. Fitt. eduldocunlentslarccl ]uc`!�OShaleJ[�Sl'N 8 -2,7- 10 NhIrcellu i lealll� �ervievv 1lristell, df [0 0 • ` °'I here is a lack of Information related to long range lil inning of drill ing sites and gas industry related activities, ■ "This Iack of inforiii at] on in it difficult for emergency services planning throughout the st��te and rcOionally_ • " We also recognize that coordination with the gas industry and �3nergency man agemc3it agencies such as I'ENJA is necessary to train first responders in the e1 -vent of accidents, spills, and industry related disasters, ■ "Thousands seeking well- payingiobs have cxpan&d energy town populations beyond the capacity of housing and public services to cope with their needs. • "Many coming into the towns have criminal records, and the pressures of Iong hours at work, poor public Foci lilies, and limited recreation opportunities have produced sizeable mental health and alcoholisin problems_ ■ "The frequency and seriousness of Q-rime has soared. In addition, the pol ice in Evanston, a typical 'boom town,' complain about lack of equipment, staff.. and facilities, • although new personnel and equipment arw- added each year, the demand for police response co31ti1tues to exceed the department's capability_ Because of this, most police work is reaotive, with little time for preventive 3iteasures and little time to train personnel in lu ;w tcchi)iqucs oi' Plan for the RrtUre. } -See also; "Tile Ecomomics of Extracting natural Gas from Shalc Forinatiolis," "Costs to Local Communities," Gasmain.org, retrieved 7111111 from hupsill sites, gToogle .comIsiter'outreachinateria lslcconom.ics 1. Local Gov ernmenIs LacIc the Resources to address (lie Effects of Erac kin g. "How Should We Think About the Econo3nic Consequences of Shale Gas ])riIIinOU?," May 201 1, Susan Christopherson anal Ned Righ(or, retrieved 7/8/11 front gas Ieas1ng.cco_corne11.edul "'i'he consistent thence is that local gavernme3nts — counties, cities, townships, villages — are subjected Go a wide range of demands for new scrvLt;es or increased IcweIs of scrvicc�, and that: the a din 1 n i strative capacity, staffing levels, equipment, and outside expertise needed to meet those dcmai�ds arc beyond anything that has been budgcled," SLlsan Christopherson, Presentation to TCCOO; ,tune 23, 2011 The existing tax systems and current proposal for a severance tax are completely indadequate to meet the nc�cds of local governments to respond to Frac kin g. fV. No. 19: "... it has not yet been eonelusively determined tbitt nafue�il gas expIo ratio n and uxiractioo is in the overall best interests of the residents .,. 0 F Dryden Neither cuw•rent disinterested analysis nor history support this equ Noe al statcmeut. Frocking its it is expected to be practiced in New York State is not iti the Best interests of the vest ma joa•ity of Dryden residents. A tiny percentage of residents might be entitled to 'Signing bonuses," but overall, the egtiMated iucomc from Fracking is dwstrfed by which will come From existing i lid ustrics. Both general economic bencifits itnd job clrerition in Penrr.s rvania from tracking slave been modest while being exaggerated by the i n d list ry, .past exprricncc with extraction industries across the country shows that it is a poor economic development strategy ror s mall rural communities like Dryden, (See pages 1149 below.) Ai The only persons assured of making money from fracking are Those paid honuscs an the signing of a leaf ie for tliei r property. All other income and profit is 9pecu.iRtive send depends on uncontrollable factors like the price of natural gas, costs of production and transportation, the number and speed with which wells can lac drilled acid (racked, pixAti ~tiwe life of wells, etc. "Ho�+r Should 11�e 'I'll role About Clio 1 "cononl is Consequences of Shale Gas Drill i1ig ?," pages . -1 l , April 2011, SLIsan Christopherson and Ned l�i;btor, retrieved 718111 fro117 g�lsleat i]1g,ace.cr�rnell,edul `° * * * The evidence fro in the Garnett shale suggests that individual M ameIIus �.IIs may 11avice short. production 1 ives. Because the NrarceIILlS Play' is Inrge and geological ly complex, however, the play as a whola ]; IikcIy to have natural gas drilling and production over an extended period Of time, IndiVidua[ corinties and 113u11icipalities Within the region Ire [ikcly to experience accelerated boons and bus I cycIes, v ** " * ** These more widely distributed ulIpacts need to be taken Il1to accoLIII( when anticipating whA efftOZ Ilatural tas drilling wit [ have on [inrlividuaIfl, comm u11ifies, [nndj their rovenues. " "* " p- I 1 B. V. lay rew iu Tompkins COU11ty (rend T)ryden) it entitled to gas lease bonuses o royalties. The best available research shows feat between 5.7 and 6. 3 percent of the adult population of Tompkins UF1I,v owns a I of tike [and under loose For fracId11g. 11: i--oIIows chat 94 pereent of the ado It residents of the COLl11( �ti�ill suf1G`erthc niyClad burdens i�racki11g Iarl I s �vhiie this tinY percentkitgc garners the orI[y definite; non- spcculatjve be1iefi1. See "Lease I°loIder3 as Percent o f TC PopLI Irl.t.ion_pdt" attaehcrl as Appendix A. C The Estimated Income from Existing Industries D% -varfs What is Expecwrl from F rackinub 12 "Drilling for I\Txtural Gas in the New York State Marecellus Shale. What are the Potential gains and risks? What are the trade -o Ffs ?" Dr. John Schwartz, Ithaca College, June 2009, retrieved 718111 from 17ttp 11 't�rw fie 3srnap or media![ iarcellt,s °10 0> o 'alties° o?0 on7pa red %20to° 100ther %2QJTJco�nc, p�f Estimated income from sources other than Fracking over 20 years of natural gas extraction are; Farm Cash Receipts 48 biIIion, Dairy Products, $39 billion; Crapes and Wine= $6 9 billion; Estimates of aftractions that bring visitors: 7.ourism 173 billion, 17un¢ing and Fishing, $32 billion, Wildlife Watching, $32 billion Total other of non gas extraction, $392 billion_ Estimated Natural Gas J.ncoinc ]br 20 Years will be $22 Billion D. The positive effects of frackinlg on the economy in Pen osylvaia since intensive Frackieig began hIIVC been icxagge rated by the industry and are min irnaI compared to other ind us tries. "Dril ling Deeper into -lob Claims, The Actual �Cuntribution of Marcel lus hale to Pcni�sylvania Jab Growi:h." Stephen l-ler7enbern June 0, 2011, Keystone Research Center, retrieved 7/9/11 from http / /key$tp11 CCS iirl:l],Or 151t 5++ Icevstoneresearcl7 .� -)r�fiiles/DriIIi11 f l� par- into- Jabs - Claims- 6 =2i}- 2011 [ }.pdf - — - "The Nlarcellus Shale is making a smali positive contribution to rk�,centiob growth in Pennsylvania. The size of that contribution, however, has been substantially inflated based on a basic intsunderstanding of the differeiice between "new hires" and job creation. The modest contribution of the Marcel lus Sh ale to job growth must also be balanced against the impact of dri11 ing 011 other industries, such a<s tourism and the Pennsylvania hardwoods industry. It is also irrtl }octant to balalnce t17e contribution of the1a�ccllus 17alc to job grovtl� against t17e sa -far unfundr,d environmental liability of the industry" p- 7 "The Economic hnpact of Shale Gas �xtr�clic)n: A Keview of P,xisting Studies," By Thumas Kinnaman- Buckncll University, Furth corning in Ecological Econc)m cs, D 0 L 10.101 1i_ecoIecon. 01 1,02,005 Fretrieved 711011 l Fi-ein htf.p.- I / /www.newscientist_ coin/ari:icle /rng211281 3.400 =ee- ol7amic- benefits -of- sha legas- extraction- uncIear_him I - - -`Studies into shale gas extraction are typically supported by industry bodies. BccHLIse their reports are not peer - reviewed, ccunomist Thomas K iiiiiaman of SuckneIi Un1versity in Le",isburc, Pennsylvania, decided to review six ofihern I1IlllseIf. ** 13 "K innaman t''o4Gi1d that they all contained f1a ws that exaggerated the honefits of shale gas extraction to local ec:01101nics, * ** 0 "l innaman a180 claims that none of the sl:udics measured all Chc costs and bentdlts of extructiijg sl3ale gas; so could not determ i n e if it really offers a net gainE" See also "How 'Should We Think About the Ec�onomis Co nsequeaiecs of Shale Gas 1)riI I'M g.." May 20l 1, Susan Christopherson and Ned Rightor, retrieved 7/8/11 61orn gasleasin&CCe.corneIIAll/ E. Must jobs crented fire not high paying. In Pen nslyvania, three- g it, Irters of t11e jobs reyiih-d only a hicyh school educat-ion. The IL ffher paying jobs �o t�� itinerar1t s40 Eke 4s [yl�ically to those from out of stater who alremady possess specialixe(l skills, See r140rcellms 15hole �valurfrl Cris Extraction Siuc�v, 2009 -2010, S'tiedv Guide X, ,' arceffus ,S oLde Natural C. Its Economic fr+t frct, League of Women Voters of PeRilSid ail ia, ztln most parts o f Pcnnsyl van i a where drilling will occur_ there is little if any existing inclustr}+ and infr%structure, 1110 reF011e, at leas( Initially, firms and empIoyces from outside of Pennsylvania will conduct much of the ccconomic activity, 'T17is Will lessen the impact on existing local businesses -" p- 25 hlgher pa} ing jobs are in 111e drill ing sector according Kelsey Penn State Web in&r presented in Indiana County, Ooobcr 1=1, 2009). Kolsey estimated that diree�- quai-lcrs of the jobs I— giiire only a high school education, and local people are after hired as laborers and for sccurit . Low 1)aying jobs, such as Chnsc found in hospitality and local retail, are also created -" p. 27 "So far, gas jobs mainly in related Felds," Scranton Dines- T'rrbune, Eli2ak etl� Slcrapits, November 7, 2 011 , retrieved 718111 - rom littl):11the- tunes- aril }one- conjj'newsj'so- Far -�$S jobSYmaEnly- iii- relr,tcd- fie lds- 1.10604904ixzi,'l R.It16Gp -K8 "Working at a driI ling site is not for evcrybod y, said Larry P4iIIiken, director of one rgy prograin8 at Lackawanna College's Towanda center- It is Strenuous, hard labor, 11F1d can inva1 %ve 1 Z -hour days and sometimes seven -diLy� weeks, according to Traci' Brundage, I'm m College's managing director of Workforce Development and Continuing &hie- ation, I ' ft's a whole di11`erent type of wort{ culture and work schedule than what "Vile used to here,! NM. Brundage sa id - `We try to train them in that, what the industry expects.' °`Mr, MiIIiken said lie has heard From the industry that: gas companies fad peel) le willing to start work, but ilot see work through to completion, " °This business is very intensive and very demand ng, and although it 1), Y very well A ; they (gas companies) expect the corn Initmenil," lie said, "i think there's a disconrfect for 13 001)le going into the business, about what the demands are, "' 14 F. historically nil, gars, and mineral extraction has proved a poor strategy for economic development for small rural CrymrrlurritieS like Dryden and Tompkins County, The Tconoinle Impact of ,ifiarcellus Shale Gas Drilling What Huve We Learned? What are the Li�arirallans? 'David Kay, l April, 2011, Cornell Cooperative Zxten,Sion, Working Paper Series, A Comprehensive Economic lmpact Analysis Of Natural Gas Extraction fn The Marcellus Shale, retrieved 719111 from littp:llc.ce- corneII- edWe lie r& clingy ateohange lnatural gas dev/DocumentsiAfsll a jonn attedinailcellus %2 Oworkii1gpaperrevised4 -4- 2011. ddf " , , , smaller rural economies v- rithout much ex isl:ing economic diversity, gas development alight offer the pos9ibiI ity of a diversification strategy. Flowever, in such places the potential for a hard boom bust cycle, and for the gas industry's coin petition with pre existing economic anchors, may be the greatest, For some individuals and con murnitics, the wave of big money would Iikely rise and fall with an abruptness that ninny would find deleterious c even as for others, the wave would he more sustained and positive -" Are Energy- focusing Counties Benefiting'? epternber, 2008 - revised 07/11/0, Fleadwaters Economics, p- 22 retrieved 7/8/11 from lkttp: l!] 3cad�vaterseconomics ,orgli- esults'?cx= 01679560743953 789412.3 ° /a3Anfi}_rnjoi i&.cof =FORM %3A9&[e =UTF- UgmFossiI +rue] +as;a +Development +Strateg_v&c a,x =11&. In counties that have pul:SLled energy extraction as an econornlp deVClop�ment strste&y- -places �4�e call engirt- focusingE1") in this report the long -terns indicators suggest that relying oar fossi I fuel extraction is not an effective economic development strategy for competing in today's growing and iriore diverse western economy, l?. "M 111 i]] l:he Data; Analyzing the Economic Implications of ill iningfor Nion ino"poIitan r1.rCas, Fre Lid enhurg, W i I I i a m R. a,nd Lisa J. Wilson, 2002. retrieved 718111 From htt}_l1 i"Y- c;av othewi I d u V,orglfi leslswu1V119. Vd p. 572. " , 9. What is abundantly clear, however, is that caul ion is also in order for a set of conclusions that have rarely been treated with caution in the past — tamely, the common conclusion or m same cases even the ,Strongly asserted conviction that mining m4Lst be good for local economics.... [T] he present analysis has shovvn that there is remarkably 1 ittle evidence to support tlrem; instead, most of the more systematic approaches to the data point instead to (lie opposite conclusion; often at h igh levels of statistical signiFicance, -° `VilanSMUed QLws6ons About Tie Economic Impaet oMasLhilling, In the Marcel Lis Shale: D�mi'tJump to C widusions," Mauch 27,20 10, Janneft Mr Barth, PER ielrived 7110/11 from httUI fl % %r%v%y.danr.3,erdrilling,coml` page_id=433 ''The entire Mxcellus Shale region in New York may be at risk � econon� icaliy aril environme�rlally. While dre ernrironmer�tal risks have bmi a focus ofconeerri, many stakeholders havre asswned tliata posirivu (xviomis impact w ould result In real ity, the wononiic impact imiy very well be negative. Ajid die likelihood is drat gas d6l ling would adversely niT'ed odlereoanoi3ris acti�7lies such aS tUaisrn and sport fishing ,9nd huntiing, ]5 {x. The actual 1) rod u etivity of Marcelles Shale gas weIIs in appears to bane been exaggerated according to eniails written by 1ndus#iy insiders. 0 "In sidcrs Sound an Akirm Arnid a Natural Gas R "h, Ian Urhina; Jrn7e , 2011 retrived 7/10/11 from 11 tfP:/A 1 w_11VLin7es "com,Q011;'0 . X261 LYS ;`26g7as.h(niI?pagcwailted =1. r = I_ In the e-maiIs) enemy executINTS, industry lawyers, stake 001 on ists and inarket {malysts orrice CP skepticism about lofty foreca ;ts and question whether companies are inWiltioneally, and even i[legaIly, overstating (lie productivity of Ill cir we 11s send t17c size of their reserves. Man} of"these a -mai Is also suggest a view, Chat is in stark contrast to more bullish public cornnients made by the industry, in much the same way that insiders have niised doubts about pri= ions financial bubbles, fee t ctu l cint�ils f in "Drilling Down. Industry T'ri %?a(e�ly ,Skel)tictYl of Shale Gas" retrieved 711011 [ ti•orr� h L / /ur "y -n irnes- COmrYll[' l "iiC tY!'C/��$ /[l'r1tIJCa1- as- drilling -clo ►n- documents -4 intro"html' ?rebus and W And, there are serious doubts about the economic viability of the entire induOry. See' Shan e Gus Abundance or �l! ira e? d by 77�c : farCelli1.s LSJ?O1e Norill Drsappoira 0 Lecpeclalion,t :,Arthur E. 13ennan I.:abyrinth CO11 s Ll. [ting Services; Inc., Washington, D.C. Ootober 2010 downloaded from ht(j)'/ by ,ivw- theoiklrum,00m[nodeJ7016, October 28, 2010 ".Shale gaq plays in the United States are com ill exc1a] failures aa7d ,911areholders in pu1)1 is expIOrti.tion and production (GBcP) companies are tl7c losers, 'C his concl usioY� fat [s out of a detiiiied e }'alu at] on of shale - dominated comp7i7y fi1jaLIQLaI sWem enis and ind ividual weII decline curve analyses See a[so: "Sh�Yl0 Gas or Tell Game," 1)resentaLion at Nati oil al People's Ci-is and Oil S11111111111 i[, November 19, 2010 retrieved 7/8/ 1 1 from http: / /wxv 7ectraencr^ vatch,corm, "w pm co,�terti u171nadsr41 [1`02Ide oral7ro Hers- shale asshell �an7e- Appendix A Percent Leaselrolders Compared to TOW Residents in Tompkins County: Bill Podulka Tompkins County Census bata: U, S. Census Bureau estimates 101, 136 residents in T )rnpkins County as of July 1, 2008. This nun7ber includes college students. 15.5 °o ofthe residt;nrq are under 18, by the 2007 1J Census Bur�eaLl e;;Linlate. So $4" ° are over ] 8 ") F'roin; hktp:,'lquicicfacts. census" gnv r'gFd/slal,r:sJ36r3G109,h1rn[ 1 A du Its: 84 -5a of 101,136 is 85,460 adult residents of Tompkins County. College Students: At Cornell, 2008 -2009 enrollment was 19,639 (130,562 Undergads and 6,077 grads and professionaI studerils) (From, http;ff www .uorliull.edu /visitinWithaca,) At Ithaca Col loge, }ail l 2008 enrollment was 6,323 (5,451 undergrads and 372 grad students) (Frain; http: //� www.iCliaca.edulir /farts /Ithaca_ _CollegeFacts_in_ Brief _2.0�08- 09 -pdt ). Total College Students in Tompkins County: 19,639 + 6,323 � 2.5,962 So, 85,460 — 25,96'2 = 5 9,49 8 adult. non - college- student residents - Prom our daCa gathered at the Toni pkins County Clerk's Office: (Counted only leases signed betiveen 1/112005 and 9134)12009). 2,332 different names appear as the principal flame on a lease: Nate Chat this n4unber includes organ irai.ions, such as churches, school districts, cemeteries, towns, and clubs, who have leased their land- There are only 68 of iNh se, so they are onIy .4 o of the total For this pLirpose, c�ch or;anication was counted as 4 ind1vidLLal. In some cases this overcounts because the same individuals also h'o'e personal leases. In other cases it undercounts because more than one person may share the royalties (although the more people sharing royalties, all smaller they are; of course } - 1.6 adults sighed per lease (calculi led from a sampie of 140 leases) 3,731 lease holders: 3,731 /59,498 = 6.3 1/a of non - college- studen t, adult popul��iian (local voters) Y r ■ f ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ A 0 ■ ■ ■ r ■ ■ * ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ w ■ ■ 4 A ■ ■ ■ 6 A ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ d ■ ■ ■ a ■ ■ ■ ■ r 4 17 Li:ilses from Years Prior to 2005E There wore 744 gas teases signal ii, rr,mpkins Counh- between 111,+2004 and 12131 }2004_ Some of these are 51.i Il in effect, and some have expired_ Some are for tax parcels thm. also are included in our database of leases signed berwuen 2005 and the press nm (because new leases were signed un these parcels)_ When a tease expires, L is not usually recorded in the'l'oml,kins County Clerk's office, so vie have no way to determine how maily of these teases are actiVe. Below is the nuinbcr of leases recorded at the Cleric's Office for each of these }'ears: 2000: 75 leases 2001: 250 leases 2002: 193 leases 2003: 60 leases 2004: t 66 leases At the Tornpkins County Clerk's Office For 2005 to 2009, there wme 2,673 teases recorded. That number, after inisfiled documents }here taken taut end duplicate names were omitted, translated to 2,332 di frerent naives on Ceases, which is 37 ° of the total recorded_ 1f we assume the same percent red LlL;Lion in leaseholders Cor the years 2000 to 2004, there are pole ntia11y 647 rnorc leasOielders_ I f these were al l d i fferent. people with dif*rent parcel9 from the 20 05 10 2009 data; and all [he, leases were slit I in eft ect, it wauid only increase the per cw of 1ew5cholders to 8.0 % (assuming 1-6 people per I�ase, 90 1,03; more pe�opte {1,035 + 3,731 = 45766)5 and thus 4,7661395 498). In mu -11(y, the increase is probably 1nLich sinal ter than that, as magiy leases have expired and others are far the same peal) le who signed lc:zises between 2005 and 2009. There are 1,159 leases recorded at the 'Tompkins County Clerk's off=ice for the years between 1900 and 20011_ aeca�RSe sc� man }� of these have expirecl or are for lands that have bce�t re- ] eased i11 tl7e la<gt 5 years, we will not consider them. L8 El Leans from Years Prior to 2005: There were 744 gas leases signed in Tompkins County behveen 11112000 and 12/3 1 12 004, Some of these are still in effect, and some have expired. Some are for tax parcels that also are included 1n our database of leases signed between 2005 and the present (because new leases Were signed on these parcels). When a lease expires, it is not usually recorded in the Tonipki[is County Clerk's office, so we 17ave no way to de[ermine how many of these leases are active. Below is the 11 4Gmber of leases recorded at the C:lerk's Office for each of these years. 2000: 75 leases 2001: 250 leases 2002: 193 leases 2003: 60 leases 2004: 156 leases At the Tompkins CoLinty Clerk's 017rwe for 2005 to 2009, there were 2,673 Jeases recorded, That number, aftr misfiled documents ;A-1erG tHUF1 out and duplicate names were omitted, tnanslated to 2,332 different nams on leases, which is 87 % of the lutal recorded_ if we ass4una the same percent reduetion in Imseholders for the years 2000 to 2004, there are potentially 647 more leaseholders. Ill these were al I different people witli different parcels from the 2005 to 2009 data, and all the lenses were still in efficl, it would only increase the percent of leaseholders to 8_01/n {assuming 1.6 people per lease, so 1,035 more people (1,035 f 3,731 = 4,76 61, and thus 4,766 ?59,498 )_ In reality, the increase is probably much sane I Ier than that, as rnany leases have expired and othe« are for the same. people who signed leases be�wctm 2005 and 2009, There are 1,159 leases recorded at the Tompkins County Clerk's office for the years between 1900 and 2000. Bjccausc so 1-nany of these have expired or are for lands that have been re- lensed in the last 5 years, we will not consider them, 19 Page 1 of Mahlon Perkins From: "Bambi Avery" < town clerkdryden.ny -us> To: "David Makar' <dmakar dryden.ny.us >; "Jason Leifer" <J Lei ter dryderl- ny,us >; "Joseph Solomon" <JSo10Mon @d ryden- ny.us >; "Steve Stellck ° <sstel i ck@ aol,com >; "Mary Ann urnrier" <supervisor dtyden.ny -us> Cc: "Mahon Perkins" < m perki n3 @ t cny,rr,com> Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 8:28 AM Subject: Feld: Drilling ban Late addition Bambi I.. Avery Dryden Town Clerk �3 F,as[ Maul Street Dryden, NY 13053 607 - 844 -8888. cxt 210 ----- OriginaJ Message---- - Froni: Mitchell Baker [mailto; liiclielJ,Bak.ea"(gc- cuny.edu'l Sent; Monday, August. 01, 2011 5:08 I'M To: Barnbi Avery Subject: Dri11Ing ball To whom it may Concern; f thank yolj 1.1161- reading this and ] wit I try to keep this short. T am strongly 1n favor of a di`II]ijig ban through zoning restrictic)ns iii the 'rovvii of Dimydeii The stag and I'eder'al governments are not going to regulate tbis inciu5h-y safely, and it is up to local gove.rtimeatto pyotect itc cifizenS. We leave a small fai-n7 on 1395 �c1 .qcs at 234 Lower rcek ltd, t* we arejust no making our. p�!unanent residence and would liike to develop :�o� teaching and smail scale vegetable �u»l fruit p rod uc #ion, None of our neighbors as far as we luiow lias sighed a gas lease; nor have we, but some of our nei gli bo& neighbors have; turd the thought of horizontal weIIs and waste v, ate r spills degrading our groundwater is lerrif}'i11 - It lncans that e will have no riahi to enjoy our owls proper. }�, 3x01- will , +e b t�l 1e to sell it far close to its previous value if the groundwater is Polluted. Let the experiment in horizontal hydro- fracking rual in Pennsylvania for another decade before Dryden allows a small fra .C1ao1) r)f 1 Ls residents to profit at an uakrl0� 1l cost to future generahons Ind all landowners 1n town. r[hele 1, s r10 rush to clrlllI the gas isn't going any here unless we puskl it out now. if it can be extracted safely, we shotLld know that beaer in 1.0 years; and by then it will be worth more as well. Finally, my ul- derslanding is that these new wells lave v�ea - }� rapid depletion rates, up to 6011/a per year, }v�hich ax�eans Eris is a real one -� line bubble that will not Dave a 1 1:ino e- conomic beneFt to ba.lalice the Iong ternn economic costs of the �.Il Vironinenzal damage. luck 1tnR I n g a difficult and c( 1lTect choice. Besr., Mitchell and ?ooelyn Baker ?34 Lower Creek road 8/2/2011 Mary Ann Sumner From: Jahn Eliot darks Uep @comel1.edu] SerM#: Wednesday, July 20. 2011 S.52 PM TO Mary ArEn Sumnor'. David Makar; Joseph Soto mon; Stephen Steliok; Jason Leifer Subject: hydfOracking issue To Whom It May Concern: Retain and I have lived Tn the more rural area east of Ithaca $1Ue moving to T@ew York in 1983, first in Brooktandale and for the past 15 years on Snyder Hill. As others have expressed, we are very concerned about the impact hydrofrackIng wi €I fiave on the quality of life in our neighborhood and the many similar ne fghba rhood s throughout the region. A negative impact on the landscape, water quality, private wells, property values, and other consequences are certain to happen; questio% remain who and how rrrany will be directly affected versus everyone else who wfllhelndfrectlyaffected. The argument that that hydrof racking will boostthe local economy faitstoacknowledge thatoncethe resource Is exhausted in an area in just afew short years, the economic boom for that area and ultimately the region will be over. perhaps of grea #est concern is the potential impact on water quality and who will bear the responsibilfty for misUken projectfons and accidents that will almost certainly occur. We hope the supervlsors Vi ll give appropriate consideration to these issues and protect the majority of residents who witl have to Dear the unwelcorne, negative consequences of hydrofrackfng. John and Robin Parks 30 Geuung Circle Ithaca, NY 1485D 7 Mau Ann Sumner From: Patricia Booth Taylor {taylorfit grnail.com] Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 11:50 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: In favor of strong gas drilling ban__. Dcc it iW_ Sumner, My husband and i are Dryden residents { 1879 Lllis FLAIL) %v Road) and we. S TRC}N6LY hydrolF�lcki11 creates. We are raisin;; ch)ldren and ait. advoQates for clean UJ and water, Please vote for this ban against gas drilling in our community. Thank you! Patricia and Kelsey Taylor 607-200-4057 I'atricia Booth '1"aylor 6033,661-8348 to yIorfit(@41 maiIIcorn 1 oppose the threat that Mara Ann Sumner ronn: {suede, Nathalie [NQuedePKaufmann.com] ent: Tuesday, August 023 2011 11:44 AM o: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban Hydro fracturing in Dryden Dear Dryden Town Board, As a property owner in Freevilie, I urge you to outlaw gas drilling involving hydrofracking within the town of Dryden. The threat to the public health is grave and the env i ron men ta I damage would be beyond repair_ Let's maintain DrydeWa water, air and land clean and available for its inhabitants and its agricultural economy_ Let's be responsible and preserve a sane place for the future generations to come. Sincerely, Regards, Nathalle Quede From: Nothalie Quede 384 Ed Hill Road Freeville, NY 10708 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Iindenoyec@gmail,com on behalf of Lin DeNoyer [Idenoyera spectrumsquare,com] Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 11;09 A To: Mary Ann Sumner- David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen telick: Joseph Solomon Subject: Why I want you to ban horizontal fracking fury Ann Sumner, Dryden Town SuperviiSOF David Makar, Dryden Town Board member Jason Leifer, Dryden Town Board member Steve Stelick, Dryden Town Board Member Joe Solomon, Dryden Town Board member l+Vhy I want you to ban horizon tal fracking in the Town of Dryden- 1_ You have limits on wind turbines - height limits, "beauty" limits, noise lirnits, But you are going to allow drilling and hydrofracking without limit? No way? Ban fraokingl 2. The people who would potentially benefit do not care if my water well becomes polluted. And the Town of Dryden has neither plans nor the financial resources to connect me to good town water, I can't take tho chance that my well would be polluted and I would have no remedy, I am 70 years old and do not have the resources to move. It would be Financial disaster_ No wayl Ban fracking! Linda Dehfoyer Snyder Hill Road Town M Dryden a Mary Ann Sumner From: Danifa [dapasov gmeil.com] 0ent, Tuesday, August 02, 2011 11 ,01 AM o: Mary Ann Sumner; Joseph olomor7; Jason Q mleifer_com; teve Ste Iick; David Dakar Subject: Gas Drilling Ordinance Dear hoary Ann Sumner and Dryden Berard Members, I'm I'vriting to express my 9Wish that you lass the natural gas orduiance this evening and protect Dryftn from hydraulic fracturing, As a Dryden resident mid landowner, T am proud that our local government is taldng; matters into its own hands, and protecting our incredible resources from complete degradation. Passing a ban allows Dryden to take tune and learn from other areas where hydraulic fracturing is taking place. If and when safer drilling methods are devised, Dryden can revisit the issue and investiCrate gas drifling further. Many people have made great comments about the issuCs with hydraulic fracturing, so I will end with a sincere thank you for your courage and conrtniUnent to Dryden's future, uicerely, Davila Apasav 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: CC: Subject: Dear Dryden Town Board, Bryna Silbert [bryna siIbert,corn] Tuesday, August 02, 2011 9'53 AM Mary Arlen Sumner kevin mayer Ban Fracking in Dryden NY We, feel that Kevin Mayer i rakes a very strong case for banning fracking in Dryden. Bryna and David_ ilbett 335 Ed hill Load "recville, NY 1306 607- 898 -3879 'Fii folks, I understand the Dryden "Fawn Board may vote on the zoning ban as early as August 2. SO IT'S ESSENrl -I.AL TO GET 'rHO E COMMENTS 1:�1 TO THE Tf11�1�'N SUPERVISOR T01\40RROW {if you haven't already dove so_ Iy letter to the toNvn is bclow. Feel free to use it obviously. I've Pasted an enia.iI from Catskill M ountairkkeeper if you need other ideas of wila( to say. If }lou don't have ti me for a detailed stxatement, then at least register your desire that they pays the zoning ordinance to outlaw gas drilling in Dryden A quick email Thanks9 r' Kevin ---- - ----- Forwarded meLisage ==WW ------ From: ke�fin ma }+2r kL %?inmavcr3(wcm,ail.conp Date. Noon. 1 Aug 2011 ?2:56:56 -0400 Subject: proposed zoa1,iFig ordinance re; frfacking To: su ervisor d den.nv_us Dear DRY DEN TONVNT BOARD, As a Dryden resident I urge you to pass the zoning oa dinance outla��in� gas drilling vitl�i.n Dryden. Hydrofraeking is totally inappropriate For our co=4nity and Nvould destroy our public roads and the peaceful, beautiful and healthy en %,, ironnlent that in akes Dryden a ]Dome to ClIerish and prate -ct. Drilling has caused serious acid widespread damage to the environnient and public health in other states where it is practiced. EVe u lien operating "ai planned ", such driI[in.g routinely fouls the air with benzine, volatile organic cornpounds, smog aiid diesel rames, destroys rural tranquility with (Ile noise ()-f pumps, compressor 01 stations and bright lights 24 Ears a day, damages public roads, increases traffic and undermines public safety and social cohesion. 0 As you may know the gas industry is specifically exempt form regulation under the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the National Evironmental Policy Act, tMany of the chemicals the industry uses and releases are carcinogens and endocrine disruptors; however the EPA is forbidden from regulating them as hazardous materials when they are used by the gas industry_ This outrageous state of affairs a]Io s the industry to get away with inurder. We can expect little protection From the Federal govemment under these circumstanG�,S, On the state level, The DEC's rules in their current Form have numerous flaws and weaknesses. Among the flaws of the current plan as identi Ili ed by Catskill Mouncainkeeper are the i1b110 win g. Hand IIng of toxic wa Ste water is still a major problem. Protection ofpriirtary aquifers is only Ebr a 1- rnited time, Bans on drillia�g in state- oivned land is inadequate_ The DEC plans to begin processing pemlitting applications before the rulemakin= process is complete. The cumulative impact requirements are incomplete, Regional areas of geological risk are not protected. Open waste pits are not out Iawed ob nder the circumstances we cannot rely on the DEC to protect our interests_ Et is oniv the Town Board that can der this. Thank you E'or the good work you have done on this measure. PIease pass the ordinance, Thank you, Kevin Mayer 1 384 Ed Hill Rd, 1'reevide, DIY 13068 607- 898 -4704 From Catskill Mountaiiikeeper; THE EMER�GINCT FACTS L B0UT THE NEW NATURAL GAS PE MITTINIG CON 1)1TTONS WH'Y N YS WO'N'T BE PROTECTED AND WHY A BAN I NOW THE IPPL SOLUTION On July 8, 011, the New York State Depa�ment of irn�ironmental conservation (DEC) released its draft Supplemental Generic nVironrnental I nip act Study (dSGEIS) - the proposed permitting conditions For the hydraulic fracturing of horizontal wells in New F York State. While the dSGE1S may appear at first glance to be a significant improvement over the previous document (released by the DEC in 2009), Mountainkeeper's investigation into the text's fine print has identified massive deficiencies. These include failing to present a mitigation plan for the inevitable public health impacts associated with fracking, and a blatant disregard to adequate drinking water protections. Additionally, this document presents the industry with a clear road map for fracking in the Catskill Park; the Delaware liver Watershed, and throughout the Southern Tier of New York. The reality is that NO amount of regulation, NO amount of permitting guidelines, and NO amount of laws and ordinances can protect our water and communities from a reckless industry as long as our regulatory industries continue to lack the staff and resources they need to properly enforce such mandates. Catskill Mountainkeeper believes that the only option to ensure protections for all New Yorkers is to ban hydraulic fracturing in New York Slate. We recognize that the process to approve fracking may go forward, and if` it does, we will continue to work tirelessly to ensure. that New York State receives the most stringent envirorunental regulations possible. Some of the issues: The I•Iandling of Toxic. Wastewater Still a Major Problem 'rhe plan by the DEC to track the solid and liquid wastes that are generated in connection with faacking sounds positive until you read that they are leaving the tracking of these wastes up to gas industry operators. We've all seen what happens when the industry is asked to police itself. Even more upsetting is that the DEC is still not classifying some of the waste that normally qualifies as hazardous, as hazardous, meaning that fracking waste could be sent to treatment facilities that are unable to properly treat it. Protection of Primary Aquifers is only for a Limited Time The DEC is proposing to prohibit fracking in primary aquifers that serve as public drinking water supplies but this "prohibition" is only limited to a couple of years after which the state could "reconsider" the bans. In addition, the DEC does not lay out the conditions under which `'reconsideration" would be reviewed. K r Sans on Drilling in State -Owned Land Inadequate The ban on drilling in state- ovyned lands looks good until you read hat while the state will prohibit well pacts above ground they wIII allow drilling under these sane lands. Plan to go ahead before a Rulemakina Process is in Effect The docwnem lays out a rulernaking pmcess that would formalize its proposed safeguards in a single set of uniform, legally enforceable regulations, which is critical, but in a totally backward move they Piave said that they would begin processing permit applications before the rut ern aking is finished. C UMWative impact RNUIPUnejits Incomplete References to how an area would be affe-cted by ofmuny, many wells is only addressed for some cumulative impact but the DEC has failed to Iay focused plaai to rev1ew and analyze- Lh , consequt out, the cumulative, impact aspects of that out a con,prehen5ive, ;rnces of a full build W e gional Areas of Geological Risk Not Protected The DEC: has not addressed fracking in areas of special geological risk; such as those %vIth fault lines that are potential pathways for the upward gradient of contaminants into aquifers because they claim that contaminants can't rise into aquifers, However, independent scientific studies have proven that upward migration of contaminants is not onl }+ possible. but also likely. The DK ha, ed their assertion on industry studies that looked at just 5 days un the €racking process. Open Waste .Pits Jgot C }utlav�red The DEC has sidestepped banning deplorable open waste pits because they say that the gas industry has asserted that they are un] ikely to use openn pits for thQ storage of wastewater. Instead uFproh.ibiting open pits out right, which should be done, they have proposed a systenn where a lone DEC employee could grant approv aI without doing an individual environmental impact study, Vc) what's next? We are waiting for the dates to be released for the public hearings that the DEC kvitl scltedule to collect comments on their plan. 0 , ETTIN G A LARD E 1' U TOUT TO "THESE HEARING l S CRITICAL_ Catskill Mountainkee t ier will alert You as soon as we. know the dates and locations of these meetings and we urge: you to plan to be there. Click here to read our New York Times letter to the editor explaining our position on J'racki ng .publishes! on July 13, 20111 11 s Mary Ann Sumner From: Kathy Russell [Kathy.Russell coFtland.edu] ant: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 9:33 AM o: Willi@rn Russell; David Makar: ,Jason Leifer; ,Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Mary Ann Sumner Subject; ban hydrofracking in Town of Dryden Importance: High Dear Town of Dryden Board Members, I am attending the Town Board meeting tonight, August 2, to Signify my support of a ban on slick water hydrofracking in the town of Dryden. my husband and I live at 434 Snyder Hill Road; he has also written to you asking you to support the ban. Neighbors just 16@@ feet from our front door have signed leases! They are either ignorant of the consequences of f racking or unwilling to recognize its long terra impact in the face of only possible short term economic benefits. As a philosophy professor at Cortland College I teach environmental ethics. I also teach philosophy o� science and political economy. I am vary well informed about arguments abort slick water hydrafracking from all 5ides of the spectrum. It is up to you as political leaders of our Town to look at the ethical considerations. They trump only possible economic development perspectives. I say .'only possible" because as Cornell professor of economic geography Susan Cristopher5on testified to members of the Tompkins County Council of governments (TCCOG), the boom /bust cycle of gas development generates more harm than good. This has been demonstrated across the country. There are two ethical principles I urge you to consider. One is the precautionary principle n�hich has been a guiding light in scientific policy making globally: "When an activity raises threats of harm to the environment or human health, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically." The second comes from Aldo Leopold'5 Land Ethic: "A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It 15 wrong when it tends otherwise." Thus I appeal to you to do the morally correct thing: BAN HYDROPRACKING IN THE TOWN OF DRYDEW Thank you for ccn5idering my input. Sincerely, Dr. Kathryn Russell Professor and Department Chair Associate Director of the Center~ for Ethics, peace and Social justice (CEPS) Philosophy Department SUNY Cortland Cortland, NY 13645 401 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Janie dark Uaniemocnclark excite,com] Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 8:23 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Hydrafracking Ban Dear Town Board Members, it i is m my h hope that y you w will t take the following concerns into account when you consider a ban on h hydro- f fracturing i in t the t town of Dryden: We are aware that (racking fluid contains many toxic and carcinogeflic chemicals. These are chemicals that are U own to interfere with hormone systems in animals, including humans. These disruptions can cause cancerous tumors, birth defects, and other developmental disorders. In the event of spills or aquifer contamination, as has happened elsewhere, the physiological effects of such chemicals may not b2 seen for many years, even in 'Future generations. We cannot risk the health of our residents and our future children and grandchildren. 2. It i5 unclear if and t4hen safer techiri,ques for the extraction of natural. gas techniques will be forthcoming. Many of us are aware that researchers have found high levels of leaked methane in well water collected near shale -gas drJUa ing and hydro- Fracking sites. Methane is not benign. It's flammable and poses a risk of explosion. In very high concentrations, it can cause asphyxiation. Little research has been conducbed on the health effects of drinking methane = contaminated water, Methane Mas been present for millions of years. It will be present for hundreds of years to come. We should not rush to gas drilling. We need to wait to assure that any and all techniques used in hydrofracking are truly safe before any drilling begins in Dryden. This includes the process and the resultant bi- products. 3. It i5 not possible to clean up aquifer contamination. on the whale, Dryden residents do not filter their well water; we deserve the same protection that resulted from the DEC prohibition of hydrofracki.ng in the New York and Syracuse watersheds was because these coromunitIes do not filter their water. 4. If a ban on hydro- rfracturing is not endorsed, the gas companies can begin to drill. In the event of aquifer contamination, everyone relying on that aquifer will be impacted for tens to hundreds of years. I urge you to ban h dro 4racturing in the town of Dryden. Our environment is priceless for its beauty and uncontaminated natural resources. Let's keep it that war. I am IN FAVOR of a STRONG gas drilling ban ordinance. Jane Clark 41 wartwood Boat} 11 Ann Sumner From: rszymanskifrontiernet. rfat *ent Tuesday, August 02, 2011 7;43 AM OF fury Aran Sumner Subject: DSEG drilling ban Itr of Aug0l,11 MaryAnn, The letter you received from the Dryden Safe Energy Coalition on August 1, 2611 regarding the zoning amendment to prohibit natural gas drilling is sobering, It i5 clear a YES vote will legally and financially jeopardize the taxpayers and you personally, Please act prudently on this matter for all of u5. I have not received a response on the questions I left with you at the July 20, 2011, I am happy to discuss a mutually agreeable meeting time, I need your answers today QP as soon as possible, Thank you, Ron Szymanski I Mary Ann Sumner From: William Russell [russellw @oacsd.orgj Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 7:20 AM To: David Makar; Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Support Hydrofracking Ban Dear Ms. Sumner, Mr. Makar, Mr. Leifer, Mr. Stelick, and Mr. Solomon: I am writing to urge you, in the strongest possible terms, to support the proposed ban on hydrofracking in the Town of Dryden. Nothing, in my view, could be more important at this juncture. My family has lived on Snyder Hill Road for 15 years. We moved here for the gorgeous countrysides, the quiet residential and rural character of our neighborhood, and the proximity to the many attractions of the Finger Lakes region. Where we live, all of the neighbors, and ourselves, have purchased the surrounding undeveloped land to "keep it green" and to support a natural habitat for wildlife, which is abundant. Our road is a major recreation way, with bikers, joggers, and walkers using it constantly. Many of these same attributes could, of course, be used to describe many other locations in our beautiful Town of Dryden. We are worried sick that gas drilling might intrude on all that matters to us about where we live. We have looked at the issue closely and have the following concerns: - It would turn a rural residential zone into an industrial zone, with very negative impact on the quality of life of residents. This would be a major breach of faith with residents who have invested their savings and sweat equity into building homes in the township. - Hydrofracking poses a major threat to domestic water supplies. Our well water is sweet and clear - if it were contaminated, the value of our property would plummet. - We know of no safe way to dispose of or treat the huge volume of wastewater resulting from the fracking process - especially when the gas companies won't reveal the chemical composition of their fracking fluids, or of the contaminated water coming out of the ground after fracking. Certainly, there is no facility locally equipped to handle this wastewater. - The volume of heavy truck traffic on our rural roads would decimate our infrastructure (and the town budget). The frequency of needed repairs and rebuilding would badly disrupt travel around the town. Reports from Pennsylvania say that the truck traffic is unceasing, delays commuting and travel time enormously, and creates an unending volume of noise as heavy water trucks labor up steep hills. - The noise and light pollution resulting from 24 -hour drilling and fracking operations would destroy our idyllic natural setting. - Experience across the country has shown that the industry is replete with accidents, many leading to contamination of surrounding land, streams, lakes, and rivers. The release of many known carcinogens and radioactive substances is especially alarming. - We are not convinced that this method of extracting natural gas is more environmentally benign than any other form of fossil fuel production. Thus it is not a "green" energy solution, as some have maintained. It is a source of huge profits for large energy companies, however, who have little interest in the quality of life of residents in our local area. Part of the issue, as we understand it, is whether local communities can control land use within their jurisdictions. On my view, nothing brings this fundamental democratic right to the fore more forcefully than the question of hydrofracking. It is critical that you insist on our right to regulate all land uses in the township, with no exceptions. I am familiar with the trials and tribulations of serving the public, as you do (I am the school superintendent in Owego Apalachin). I know about the courage it takes to do the right thing in the face of public controversy. In this case, I hope all of you can stand together and support the large number of your constituents and neighbors who want nothing to do with gas drilling and hydrofracking in the Town of Dryden. Sincerely, William C. Russell, Ph.D. 434 Snyder Hill Road Town of Dryden 607 -273 -4523 1 Ann Sumner rom: kevin mayer [kevinmayer3 @9m ai1, corn ] ent: Monday. August 01, 2011 10:57 PM 4001b Mary Ann Sumner Subject: proposed zoning ordinance re, fracking Dear DRYDEN TOWN BOARD, As a Dryden resident I urge you to pass the zoning ordinance outlawing gas drilling within Dryden. Hydrofracking i5 totally inappropriate for our community and would destroy our public roads and the peaceful,, beautiful and healthy environment that makes Dryden a home to cherish and protect. Drilling has caused serious and widespread damage to the environment and public health in other states where it is practiced. Even when operating "as planned ", such drilling routinely fouls the air with benzine, volatile organic compounds, smog and diesel fumes, destroys rural tranquility with the noise of pumps, compressor stations and bright lights 24 hrs a day, damages public roads, increases traffic and undermines public Safety and social cohesion. As you may know the gas Industry is specifically exempt form regulation under the clean Water Act, the Safe chemicals the EPA is Drinking Watei% Act, and the National Evironmental Policy Act. Many of the the industry uses and releases are carcinogens and endocrine disruptors; however forbidden from regulating them as hazardous materials when they are used by the gas industry. This outrageous state of affairs allows the industry to get away with murder. We can expect little protection from the federal government under these circumstances. On the state level, The DEC's rules in their current form have numerous flaws and weaknes5e5. 0 ong the flaws of the current plan a5 identified by Catskill Mountainkeeper are the ol1owing . Handling of toxic wastewater is still a major~ problem. Protection of primary aquifers is only for a limited time. Bans on drilling in state -owned land Is inadequate. The DEC plans to begin processing permitting applications before the rulemaking process is complete. The cumulative impact requirements are incomplete. Regional areas of geological risk are not protected. Open waste pits are not outlawed. Under the circumstances we cannot rely on the DEC to protect our interests. It is only the Town Board that can do this. Thank you for the good work you have done or} this measure. Please pass the ordinance. Thank you, Kevin Mayer 384 Ed Hill Rd. Fr ieeville, NY 13068 607= 898 -4704 Mary Ann Sumner From: Barbara McGarrigle [celticsister @live.comj Sent. Monday, August 01, 2011 9:22 PM • To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban on drilling Dear Supervisor Sumner, I am writing to ask you and other board members to support a ban on gas drilling in the Town of Dryden. I own land and reside in the Town of Dryden adjacent to the Hammond Hill State Forest. Drilling for gas is a invasive process that will impact all residents not just those with leases, therefore I do not feel that only leased landowners should determine whether we drill or not. One of my biggest concerns is the exemption of the oil and gas industry from major environmental laws including the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. As a private citizen this is the only way myself and others could bring suit should something go wrong especially if we haven't leased. I already question the integrity of a industry that came in the back door and negotiated leases with landowners without discussion within the communities they planned to operate, pitting neighbor against neighbor. Please support a ban and let's explore alternative energy options. Thank -you for your time and consideration of this important issue, Sincerely, Barb McGarrigle 241 Canaan Road Brooktondale NY 14817 I Mary Ann Sumner From: Robyn Bern [ithacabyrdgmail,com] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 8:11 PM a: Robyn Bem Cc: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar, Jason Leifer, Stephen Stellck, Joseph Solomon Subject: hello I'm writing to you to thank you for all the work you have been doing in researching and listening and reflecting about the proposed ban on h drofracking. I continue to support you in thks effort. At one of the meetings I described what it is like in Towanda, Pennsylvania. The drilling traffic is nonstop (huge tankers and many trucks), causing "gridlock" in the town throughout the day as the tankers and trucks go back and forth. As I drive in Ithaca when :it's busy, I shake my heart as I can foresee what driving in the Finger Lakes area will be like should the drillers and money - Seeking landowners have their way. Tourists will find somewhere quieter to visit. Citizens here, we in other areas, such need to take care of ourselves a5 where the gas is being in this regard. used, don't care what happens our lives will be changed if we allow the drilling to take place. The noise pollution, Particulate matter from all the trucks, the use of millions of gallons of our water will be used (where i5 all that going to origi.nate? ), and the huge problem of what to do with the used fracki.ng solution. In a way, I'm glad that I will be sixty years old in a couple of days and won't live long to See the destruction and pollution of our beloved area if the industry* is allowed to proceed. I've been in mfr home twEnty years and can't imagine living elsewhere, but . . . �ast year I went to Towanda every couple of weeks to care for a friend who was ill, We went on a few driving tours to see the sites being dL3veloped there. There i5 nothing like seeing it firsthand. All the large white water containers in front of homes whose wells have been polluted. The positioning of cemented centers of drilling and processing placed uphill from nearby homes. The inadequate "containment" of the waste material in hollowed ground lined with black plastic, The condition of the roads (which the drilling companies try to keep repaired). The workers are mostly from elsewhere, so the claim of the industry that local employment will rise significantly just isn't true. And the industry tries to be a good "citizen" by contributing to the library, etc etc, it goes on and on, PLEASE VOTE FOR A BAN ON FRACKING Thank you, Robyn Bem 3 Ringwood Court West SAVE WHERE WE LIVE. 11 Miry Ann Sumner From David Quinn Jacobs [dgjecomell.com] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 4'54 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Maka , Jason Leifer: Joseph Solomon, Stephen Stellck Subject: Rem HydrofracWng San Comments Dear Town Board, I attended the Dryden town hearing on the hydrofracking ban, with all the members of ray family. Them are four voters in our household., We okin g0 acres in Dryden, and run a local business (Ludgates). we are long -time residents and committed to living here the rest of our lives. our health and wealth are definitely at stake in this issue, and we strongly favor the ban. We appreciate very much your efforts in becoming informed and active. At a time when state and federal governments have been sold to the highest corporate bidders, we need our local government to be strong and to represent the interests of everyday people. There are numerous good reasons to ban (racking in our region -- all covered pretty well by the public comments. There is only a single motivation for allowing a few individuals in our community to jeopardize the collective well - being: money. That short -term, myopic and selfish perspective simply cannot be justified. As wi'Ch a lot of things that are just, it will take a great deal of courage to pass the ban. Please know that you will have our active support. Best regards, David Quinn- 7acob5 1 I Mary Ann Sumner *From: David Quinn Jacobs fdgj a ecerneJJ.comj ent: Monday, August 01, 2011 6:59 PM Old Fury Ann Sumner: Joseph Sorornon; Stephen S telick; David Makar, Jason Leifer Subject: Re; Hydrofrack�ng Ban Comments I forgot to mention one thing in my last note. I just returned from a family reunion in Niagara Falls. The splendid city of my childhood now looks like Beirut after the bombing, due to the of -Fects of post - industrialization. Lave Canal was the tip of the iceberg there. After the factory owners found it more profitable to move to Mexico in the 1980's, they left behind a toxic, hideous wasteland of buildings, rusted railroad tracks, giant paved areas and poisoned water. ply god - father's nice house downtown sold for $12,000 recently, and he was glad to get that, I read in the local paper that 45 of the population is on public assistance, Most of my uncles and aunts lost their jobs after the industry left, and most of my generation had to move away to make a living. Anyone that still think5 corporations will benefit Tompkins County through industrialization shou'd take a trip to Niagara Falls (USA) and drive down Main St, Best regards, .dqj I Mary Ann Sumner From: Peter Gregory [pg46 @cornell.edu] Sent: Monday, August 01, 20114:02 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Please vote for the ban on hydrofracking tomorrow Importance: High Dear Town Board Members, With your key vote on Fracking coming up tomorrow, we would appreciate your taking into account our strong belief that there should be a ban on hydrofracking in Dryden. We urge you to vote for this ban. On July 20 we wrote: QUOTE: We are deeply distressed by the prospect of fracking in the Town of Dryden and in the Finger Lakes in general. Please join our neighboring towns and ban this process from Dryden. Fracking, because of the environmental pollution that can come with it (noise, contamination of our drinking water, etc.), truck congested roads, plus the drilling rig- related eye sores that would ruin our region's treasured scenery could have a serious adverse effect on this region. The effects would reach far beyond the purely aesthetic and destroy our valuable tourist industry forever. At Finger Lakes. Corn their opening statement is "The Finger Lakes are an ideal destination, drawing countless visitors to the natural, scenic beauty of the region." Add fracking to the equation and this statement could be re- written as follows: "Want to see the destruction of the most scenic, environmental treasures of the USA? Come to the Finger Lakesl" Perhaps the most tragic aspect of this is the strong possibility — recognized by some companies in the fracking business — that they might not find the gas even having mutilated our landscape in their rush to extract it. This was illustrated in a recent NY Times article at littp://www.nvtimes.comZ2011/O6/26/us/26gas.html? r= 1 &emc =etal which stated that "Natural gas companies have been placing enormous bets on the wells they are drilling, saying they will deliver big profits and provide a vast new source of energy for the United States. But the gas may not be as easy and cheap to extract from shale formations deep underground as the companies are saying, according to hundreds of industry e -mails and internal documents and an analysis of data from thousands of wells. In the e- mails, energy executives, industry lawyers, state geologists and market analysts voice skepticism about lofty forecasts and question whether companies are intentionally, and even illegally, overstating the productivity of their wells and the size of their reserves." This is not the only evidence of dishonesty in the industry. On the front page of July 16 -17, 2011 edition of The • Ithaca Journal an article entitled 'Landowners look for an escape after signing drilling contracts' highlighted the lies that are told to potential lessors. in one case, the company stated that the target lessor had no choice 1 but to lease, citing the "forced integration" that could be imposed on her by the company. Such a Circumstance, she was told, would give her zero control over her land, As it turned out, this was false. OAgaln, we strop l ur a ou to tan frackin from the Town of Dr den. strongly g Y g y Thank you for considering these corn ments. Nerys and Peter Gregory END QUOTE Since we sent that rnessage we have become even more convinced about the negative aspects of fracking but w2 have heard nothing persuasive on the positive side, Of course, some landowners in this area are likely to make a goad profit from leasing their la rid to companies involved in fracking, But does that compensate the population at large for the harmful environmenta I, financial, infrastructura I and qua lity of life i$sues that fracking will bring to us? Perhaps, in the longer terrn, even those landowners who would make short -term gains from fracking might suffer from the longer -terra negative effects, 5ptcI I negative aspects That became more a pparent to us aftLr we gent our July 20 "' message to you include, # FrackinS's toil on roads: In the Ithaca Journal of July 27 a front page article was headed `Fracking's toll on roads estimated, Repairs could cost hundreds of millions annually._„' This statement was based on a leaked internal New York State Department of Transportation document that proxected a fracking - related increase of up to 1.5 million heavy truck trips per year in. the State —an increase that NY is not in a pasitlon to address, And neither is Dryden prepared to cope with our share of that increase, * Drill wastewater being used on roads; In the Ithaca Journal of July 21 another front page article addressed a serious negative consequence of fracking , the use cif drill wastewater in road maintenance. This fluid often contains brine, heavy metals, and radioactive material's — a stark contrast to the DEC's claifn that it was just "salty water", The July 30631 issue of the Ithaca Journal had a front page article entitled `Finger Lakes wine industry a boon to area economy', Just imagine what fracking would do to our present idyllic surroundings, clean water, and our little piece of heaven, bet's stand together with our neighboring towns and make sure that such wonderful progress in our area is not destroyed by the abuses that come with fracking. Please defend our Town and all of us who enjoy life here now, Many thanks for all of your heroic efforts to make the Town of Dryden such a wonderful place to live, Sincerely, Peter a nd Nerys Gregory *14 Hunters Lane, Ithaca, NY 1485D (Town 0 f Dryden) Mary Ann Sumner From: Eric Liner feliner@cornell.eduj NqW Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 3:51 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: I Support The Ban on Gas Drilling In Dryden Mary Ann Sumner Town of Dryden Supervisor 93 East Main Street Dryden, NY 13053 CC: Town of Dryden Planning Board August 1, 2011 Dear Supervisor Sumner, I am writing to express my strong support of the proposed legislation banning gas drilling in the Town of Dryden. Hydro - (racking poses substantial threats to our health, safety, quality of life, and financial security; and the drilling industry has not sufficiently demonstrated that they are capable of containing or managing the hazards inherent in the drilling process. On at least one occasion this Spring, thousands of gallons of fracking fluid were spilled in Bradford County, Pennsylvania causing residents living in proximity to the drilling sites to be evacuated from their homes. A number of Pennsylvania and Colorado families are subsisting on • crater trucked to their homes because their private wells no longer supply clean drinking water. Many claim of dizziness, headaches, and increased illness as a result of exposure to polluted air and grater. A recent Duke University study shored that methane levels were 17 times higher in wells located near hydro- fracking sites. This specter of environmental disaster is not something that Dryden residents should be forced to live with, and certainly not in the name of royalty checks or property rights. We can't afford to be evacuated from our homes, bathe our children in contaminated water, or breathe polluted air. These aren't, as some might suggest, emotional arguments; these are legitimate concerns based on real scenarios playing out in gas towns across this country. There will no doubt be spills, accidents and disasters, it's only a question of where and when. For those of us that care for our friends and families more than our wallets that option is unacceptable; there is no monthly check or new car that will compensate for the safety and good health of our children and spouses. Please don't let us fall victim to this reckless industry that cares only about whether they can buy our compliance and loyalty. Thank you for taking such a serious and considerate approach in your examination of this issue. Now is the time to plan and make decisions to protect our community. Please pass the ban on gas drilling in Dryden. Sincerely, Eric Liner 12 Hollister Road, Freeville, NY 13068 • 1 Mary Ann Sumner 40ro+m: Jillian M Liner Brnb249 c cornell.edu] ent: Monday, August 01, 2011 2;27 PM 0: Mary Ann Sumner Cc; David Makar, Jason Leifer, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick Subject: I support the barn Mary Ann Sumner Town of Dryden Supervisor 93 East Main Street Dryden, NY 13053 CC: Town of Dryden Plannfng Board August 1, 2011 Dear Supervisor Sumner, i am writing to express my strong support of the proposed legislation banning gas drilling from the Town of Dryden. J attended the public hearing, but chid not speak then and want to express my position here. I moved to Dryden in 2001 and quickly realized how fortunate I was to have chosen to live in Dryden, f was not familiar wfth the area and there were a number of towns around here where I could have settled, initially l anted on Irish Settlement Road, and when my husband and t were ready to buy a home, we knew that we anted to stay in that area. It tools us over two years to find a home, but a found one lust a few rniies away on H oil ISter Road. it was important to us to find a quiet street as we wanted to start a fancily yet still be in the beautiful, rural part of Dryden. We have invested a Iot fn our house and it is our lamest financial investment. The thought of our "neighborhood" becoming industrial and JOSfrrg what a love most about the area is beyond disappoIntfng. You have heard all the points in support of the ban, and i agree with them. The potential impacts are potential, but they are real risks. To say that the risks won't become a reality in our town because the risks are Join or technology has unproved is ignorant and short - sighted, We don't have to look far to see what can happen to residents and communitieS. A friend used to vacation every year in ManSffeld, Pennsylvania and since drilling moved to that area she has stopped going because it is no longer a place you want to take a vacation. That is not my vision for Dryden. it is disheartening to think that potential financial gains ns are drving the support for drilling when it could greatly reduce our quality of Iffe and our financial investment. Why should my neighbor have the right to do something on his/her land that could have serious consequences to my health and finances? If the potential impacts start to becarne a reality, we will move. If hydrofracking comes to our area our largest financial investment, our home, will take a hit, but we will move before our health and other quality of life issues are irnpacted. There is nothing more important to nie than my family's health and life is too short to live in an area that jeopardfaes that, It lust isn't worth it, My husband already had cancer and our young family deserves better than putting any of us at risk to the known threats associated with hydrofrackfng. 16 w is the time to plan and make decisions to protect our community, J have great admiration for the Town of Dryden officials who are con sidrering banning drilling; it speaks sa highly of the vision and values that the Town officials hold for Dryden, and makes me very proud to be a resident. Thank you for putting 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: dmmermin @gmail.com on behalf of Dorothy Mermin (dmm12 @comell.eduj Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 1:53 PM To. Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar, Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: fracking Dear Dryden Town Board members, I urge you to vote ui favor of a ban on fracking. 1 am concerned noise, traffic, and pollution of various kinds. Our quality of life values. (Last week someone told me that her family has decide house because land near by was leased for drilling, and without a often -- even before the effects of drilling actually kick in.) about threats to our water supply and roads; will decline drastically, and so will property J not to buy what seemed like their dream strong ban this will happen more and more Many people signed leases in ignorance of what fracking is and the effects of signing on their own property and on the community. They now bitterly regret what they did and would undo it if they could. The large amount of land that has been leased does not in fact mcaui large -scale support for drilling. I hope you will take this into account when you consider the wishes of your constituents. Until we have more information, surely the safe thing to do is to ban fracking now. If our fears turn out to be «Wong, we cem undo the ban, but if they're right, this is probably our last chance to save our community. Thank you for your attention -- Dorothv Xlermin 75 Hickory Rd To«7i of Dryden 1 Mary Ann Sumner 0orn: Katie Quinn - Jacobs [kqj a quinn jaccbs -org] nt: Monday, August 01, 2011 1:26 PM 014 (Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Ste lick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Hydrofracking Ban comments Dear Town Board Members, I attended the public hearing on the proposed Town of Dryden (racking ban on July 20th. Like the majority of towfl residents, I too have researched this issue and have grave concerns about the safety of allowing the oil and gas industry to drill here (or anywhere) and I am also skeptical about the long -term economic benefits of (racking for our community. In addition, 1 haven't yet seen the cradle to grave net energy analysis that convinces me that fracking makes sense in terms of energy return on energy invested. It was beneficial to have a chance to listen and read the arguments against the ban at the July 20 hearing, but I remained unconvinced by them. The anti -ban argument boils down to playing a dice game with our local environment for the monetary benefit of a few landowners - and outside interests in the oil & gas industry. The suggestion that the ban amounts to confiscating private property is flawed as it's obvious that industrialization by gas companies will impact the entire area, not just an individual farmer's private decision to sell their mineral rights. Although, due to state regulations, zoning laws don't apply in the case of (racking, the principal behind zoning laws establishes a strong, Yong -held precedent that individual rights can be superseded by the greater good. It is the town's responsibility to protect residents against personal land use choices that could be "deleterious to others, 40hd the thinly veiled threat of lawsuits if the ban is put in place, should be tempered by e reality that lawsuits can go both ways. Residents who suffer damages to property or person as a result of industrialization may also bring suit. Beyond our local township, the reality of the current position of both our federal and state governments Js that they are heavily influenced by the lobbying and financial efforts of the oil & gas industry. We cannot reasonably look for assistance beyond our oti,rn communities to protect ourselves from the externalities of gas extraction. It is clear that the new Governor does not intend to even grant us equal protection, as evidenced by his decision to exclude the Syracuse and NYC watersheds -From drilling, but allots it elsewhere. In an era where cutting the budgets of regulatory agencies, like the EPA and DEC, continues at the federal and state level, it is beyond naive, perhaps even purposefully negligent, to consider that industrialization ooF the Marcellus shale bed can be adequately regulated. Like it or not, it is up to us at the local level to be good stewards to the land, air and water that has been passed down to us. Landownership has its responsibilities as well as its benefits. My family owns over 80 acres of land and a local service business (Ludgate Farm & Market) in Dryden. Although we could gain Financially in the short -term from selling our mineral rights and supplying goods to gas industry workers, we would not rest easy knowing we had jeopardized our neighbors well -being and played a part in permanently altering the local landscape For short -term personal gain. It is up to us to learn from other communities in Colorado, Alabama, Texas and Pennsylvania d not onit t the same mi y no repeat stakes, but change the game. How are we ever to convince �r state and federal governments witho+it sending a clear unified message back to them? How are we ever to get the safety measures needed, if we don't stand together and let them know that what has come to pass in other regions of the country is not acceptable to those of us Who lave in the Marcellus? Friends and families who live in other townships in the Marcellus I & Utica shalebeds are watching what happens in Dryden and hoping we ban fracking, so they can do the same. Those who argue for a "middle of the road" solution need to take their ideas to Albany & • Washington and convince the state and federal agencies to adopt the safeguards they are promoting and to fund the implementation of the necessary regulatory measures. This is a tall order, I know. But without it, since the town's options are limited, "middle of the road" just means "business as usual." I am sure each of you on the town board feels the weight of the decision before you and have researched this issue thoroughly. I truly thank you for your service to this community. Given the situation we're collectively in, I see no other option but to impose the ban. We must stand with the Town of Ithaca and force Albany and Washington and the gas industry to take notice. Thank you and wishing you all the best, Katie Quinn - Jacobs N Mary Ann Sumner From: Andrew Rappaport [ajr holtccrn] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 12:10 PIS To: Joseph orarnon; Stephen Ste lick I Jason Leifer: Davits Makar; chary Ann Sumner Subject Dryden Town Ban on gas ddiling - Vote YES for Ban Dear Dryden Town Board members: As a 19 year resident of the town of Dryden and I'm am writing to express my very strong support for a strong gas drilling ban ordinance for Dryden township, Having followed all of the bad news from Pennsylvania, and even the Ithaca Journal article this week on the over $200,000,006 expected cost of annual road repairs, I'm convinced that hydraulic fracking will be devastating to New Fork State. The natural beauty of the Pingerlakes and our whole tourism industry will be replaced with truck traffic, contaminated water, and industrial sites. As an architect, I've been personally involved with hazardous materials left over on building sites and I can't imagine the environmental devastation the gas industry will leave in its wake. Please vote yes on the gas drilling bars and help save rev from its self. Thank you, Andrew Rappaport 71 fdain Street, Etna Andrew 1. Rappaport, AIA, LEER AP }architect, Project Manager HOLTArchPtects, P.C. 217 N. Aurora St. Ithaca, NY 14850 phone 507 273 -760C) fax 607 273 -0475 htto://www.holt,coi-n io Mary Ann Sumner From: reuben rappaport [reuben.rappaport @gmail.com] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 12:00 PM To: Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer; David Maker, Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Dryden township gas drilling ban- comment in favor of Dear dryden board members, as a resident of dryden tovvnship 1 am quite concerned by the possibility of the contamination of my water by the hydrofracking process. Please vote in favor of a strong ban, otherwise this region may soon no- longer be livable. Sincerly, Reuben Rappaport 571 Main Street Etna NY 13062 i Mary Ann Sumner From: Loma Bayer [leb2 @cornell.edu] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 11:42 AM To: Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer; David Makar; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Dryden Town Ban on gas drilling - comment in favor of Ban Dear Dryden Town Board members: I am writing to express my support for a strong gas drilling ban ordinance for Dryden township. As a town resident with water supplied by a drilled well, I am concerned about the potential effects of the drilling procedure on our water safety and potability. The DEC report recommendation against gas drilling in the NYC watershed region is an admission of the potential harm to water safety that this procedure may create. Residents of Dryden Township are entitled to the same caution and concern for our water safety as residents of NYC. Please vote yes on Thank you. Sincerely, Lorna Bayer 571 Main Street Etna, NY 13062 the gas drilling ban. 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: Dear Ms. Sumner, Renee [mediterrenee @gmail.com] Monday, August 01, 2011 11:39 AM Mary Ann Sumner Vote to Ban Hydraulic Fracturing I live with my spouse and small children in the Town of Dryden, where we value the natural beauty, the wild animals, and the clean water. Tomorrow you will be voting on the issue of drilling and pumping enormous amounts of potentially toxic chemicals into the earth we live on. I am sitting in front of the computer now to try to compose a compelling letter to ask you to help prevent this very bad thing from happening. Banning hydraulic fracturing is necessary for many reasons. First of all, it is not safe. Consider the important fact that New York's DEC has banned hydro - fracking in the New York City watershed because they know something of its dangers, lust as they have decided to protect New York City's residents and land from the dangers of hydro- fracking, so too should we decide to protect our town's residents. There is no way to keep the bad and irreversible effects of hydraulic fracturing confined within the perimeter of leased property. And the health and safety of our environment and people should not be sacrificed so that a few may profit in the short term. Many people who have leased their land to gas companies do not understand how formidable are both the hydraulic fracturing process and its effects. They may have believed it to be a good idea for themselves.-in the short term, but failed -to consider all its different potentially harmful effects -- for themselves and the people and nature around them. I have talked to people who have told me that, at the time when they signed the lease to their land, they were simply unaware of all the ramifications, or did not consider the damage that fracking could cause. if we think about all this, and if we consider the damage that has where hydro - fracking has already occurred, we see that we must not Dryden. So, I urge you -- on behalf of my children, my community, the whole picture, the natural resources, and the animals around us Please vote to ban hydraulic fracturing. Thank you. Truly, Renee Morgan -Knapp 1 already happened in places allow it to happen here in the people who do not see -- to do the right thing: Mary Ann Sumner From. Catherine Mary Wagner [cmw18 @corne11.eduj Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 11:38 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: ban fracking! Dear his. Sumner, I am a resident of Dryden living on Ellis Hollow Road. I depend on water. We moved here from Cayuga Heights in 2006 because we wanted environment. Now we are worried that we will lose our water and be pollution, loud noises and lights (all of this 24/7). If we had known about the possibility of fracking in our area we wo home in the country. But a ban by the town could preserve our home a well for all of my to be in a more rural surrounded by air uld not have purchased a and our surroundings. A friend of ours who lives in Arkansas has watched her state go down hill and knows many people who cannot even give their homes away at this point. Please do not let this happen in Dryden. I have been looking into the economic aspects of fracking and see nothing but a communities such as ours. A few will gain and the rest of us will pay the bills be substantial)-while also seeing our home values go down. Even ignoring the serious environmental issues the economic issues are serious. Thank you for your help. Y incerel , Catherine M. Wagner 1 downside for (which will Mary Ann Sumner From: Beverly Hillman [bbhillmanl @gmail.com] Sent: Monday, August 01, 2011 11:23 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Hydro fracking Dear Supervisor Mary Ann Summer, Please be responsible for all of us and our health, well water, children, farm animals, and pets when you vote NO for Hydro Fracking. My husband Bob and I have 13 acres in Ellis Hollow. We have an acre size pond stocked with fish fed by underground springs connected to a koi pool and then a stream which feeds across the road which feeds into the creek along the Ellis Hollow Creek Rd. All of the ground water is connected. Once contaminated this is a dead source of water for three or more generations. We were approached by a company granting to drill on our pastures, We said "No" but they were very persistent and even rude. We still said "No" even when the hazards were not known to us. Please ban Hydro Fracking. Sincerely, Beverly Hillman and'Dr. Robert B. Hillman, D.V.M. of 159 Ellis Hollow Creek Rd. Ithaca, N.Y. ph: 273 8838 i into the pond Mary Ann Sumner Rrom. Christopher Knapp [cknapp @binghamton.edu] ent: Monday, August 01, 2011 10:10 AM To. Mary Ann Sumner Subject: My support for a strong ban on hydraulic fracturing Dear Ms. Sumner, I am a Dryden resident, and I strongly urge you to vote to ban hydraulic fracturing in our town. There are many reasons why a ban is necessary. The most important is that hydraulic fracturing is not safe. This is evinced by the fact that New York's DEC has banned hydrofracking in the New York City watershed. Just as they have decided to protect New York City residents, so too should we decide to protect our town's residents. We should not sacrifice the health and safety of our people or our environment so that a few may profit in the short term. There is no way for those who lease their land to gas companies to keep the harms of drilling confined to their property. So this is clearly an issue to be decided on by the community as a whole, no matter what your views are about the proper scope of government. And it is clear that if we look at hydrofracking from the perspective of the whole community, it is something we should prohibit. Sincerely, 0hristopher Morgan -Knapp 14 Knoll Tree Road 1 Mary Ann Sumner MENNEENOMM From: Fred L. Conner [conner @comell.eduj Sent: Monday, August 01, 20119&38 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Cc: David Makar; Jason Leifer, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick Subject: Please vote for the HVHF ban To: Dryden Town Board members From: Fred Conner, Irish Settlement Rd., Dryden You have not heard perhaps you've see DRAC petition, and MAJORITY in Dryden my voice before or read any letters to the editor written by me. But me at your town board meetings during the last year or so. I signed the I emailed my friends and neighbors to do the same. I am part of the silent to protect that has worked behind the scenes Dryden's present quality of life and abundant, precious resources, and especially potential for the sake of our children and grandchildren. - pro its future I applaud all the hard work and "homework" you've done o you take this issue seriously, and that the extremes of "doing the right thing" particularly challenging. Please move quickly to ensure that the ban is incorporated in t vote is taken. ver the past two years. I know that available "facts" and opinions make vote to enact the ban now, and then he revised zoning law, too, when that Thank you for all the studying and listening you've done over many, many months. 1 Ann Sumner rnrn: Richard 0. Dudley [rgd8 cornell_edu] ent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:43 PPS To fury Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen telick, Joseph Solomon Subject: We need a ban on the hydraulic fracturing method of gas extraction Dryden Town Board; I fully support a ban an gas drilling and related activities especially the use of the hydraulic fracturing technique_ These activities are likely to result in environmental damage especially to waterways and In particular to groundwater which, as many of us know, is already of rather marginal quality in many parts of the town. I have worked with natural resources in many pa its of the world, a nd the use of "fracking fluids" of unknown composition, the likely increase in methane emissions, the heightened possibility of spills, increased trucking traffic al I definitely worry me. Some believe that drilling will improve "the economy ". But fn reality most new jobs would be temporary, and would be taken by "outsiders" already familiar with the drilling procedures. These people will very likely leave the area after drilling fs complete, leaving the degraded roads, and abandoned sites for the rest of us to clean up. It is my sincere belief that the need for tax revenue would rise fn Dryden, even as land values drop. A quick visit to any "resource rich" area will tell u5 that it is not the local people who benefit from resource extraction_ West Virginia and parts of Pennsylvania come to mind, Please work to keep Dryden healthy, clean, and quiet, 41lichard G. Dudley 21 Etna Lane Etna, NY 13062 607 379 9999 Richard G. Dudley Adjunct Associate Professor Corneal I nternational Institute far Food, Agriculture, and Development fgd6 Pco rnell,edu http:JJea rthOI_net /RGDudfevl ceJI phone: 607 - 379 -9990 Skype: rgdudley Ii Mary Ann Sumner From: Carol Colfer [cjpeolfer @gmail.com] Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 8:06 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: We need a ban on hydrofracking. Importance: High Dear oflftcials, I would just like to register my strong feeling that we in Dryden need a serious, long term ban on (racking - - -at least until there is believable evidence that it will do no harm. Eve.r;rthing I've read and heard suggests it DOES do serious long term harm, and we shOLdd avoid it like the plague here in Dryden. Thank you for your attention, and I hope you share my concern and vote accordingly. Sincerely, Carol J. Pierce Colfer, PhD, MPH Book Review Editor, Agriculture and Human Malues Visiting Fellow, C1.1177U7, Cornell University, Ithaca, l\TY, USA, 14853 Senior Associate, Center for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia Phone: 1 -607- 291 -4058 Cell: I -607 -379 -9977 Address: 21 Ltna Lane, PO Box 280, Etna, NTY 13062 -0280, USA Email: c.colf.en&c,eiar.or, Skype: carol.colfer I Mary Ann Sumner from: Jessica Evett- Miller Ue18 @cornell.eduj ent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 6:41 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; Joseph Solomon; Jason @jmleifer.com; Steve Stelick; David Makar Subject: Strong support of a drilling ban Dear Dryden Town Board Members, I own property in Etna, and have lived in Tompkins County my entire life. i would like to thank you in advance for all the careful planning and strategizing that you have done to protect Dryden from the effects of large scale industrialization that hydrotracking will be bringing to our region if'New York State fails to institute a state -wide ban. I do not believe that Dryden residents stand to gain from the affects of drilling operations. Instead, we risk seeing a decrease in our property values while simultaneously seeing a rise in rental prices, forcing local residents to seek more affordable housing elsewhere. We risk having our emergency responders and road crews stretched thin with an increase in traffic accidents due to a higher volume of traffic and degraded roads. We risk seeing an increase in crimes committed by out -of -state workers who care little about our community and the people living here. We risk losing our abundant sources of clean water and clean air to breath, resulting in an increase in asthma and other health problems. These are all the affects that other areas have suffered where hydrofracking has taken hold. These are risks that Dryden would be prudent to avoid. To my mind, these risks outweigh any temporary economic benefits. Wherever extractive industries come to remove a finite resource, local regions fall prey to a boom, bust cycle. I know that you have all read studies bout the environmental damage «mought by hydrofrack.ulg and have followed the reports coming out of Oennsylvania, and understand the risks that drilling brings with it wherever it is done. Thank you for taking so much time to educate yourselves on this VERY important topic. i will not be able to attend Tuesday night's meeting, but will be there in spirit and want you to know that I greatly support your votes in favor of an amendment to our current coning ordinance that will restrict and prohibit heavy industry in our ToovNin. Thank you. Sincerely, Jessica Evett -Miller 30 Upper Creek Road Etna, NY i Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject: Dear Ms, Sumner, David Ruppert [dr24 @cornell.edu] Sunday, July 31, 20114:31 PM Mary Ann Sumner David Ruppert ban gas drilling in Dryden I am writing to urge the Dryden Town Board to vote in favor of a gas drilling ban. The DEC will not permit hydrofracking in the Syracuse and NYC watersheds. This is an admission that hydrofracking is not safe. Large cities are being protected from hydrofracking, but small communities such as the Town of Dryden must protect themselves. If gas drilling is not banned in the Town of Dryden, then large amounts of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals will be pumped into the ground. Inevitably, these chemicals will contaminate our drinking water because of accidental spills, improper casings, and other human errors. These chemicals are volatile and will contaminant our air as well. The costs to human health will be serious and long- lasting. Property values will decrease since the Town of Dryden will become a less desirable place to live. Sincerely yours, David Ruppert 154 Ellis Hollow Creek Road Ithaca, NY 14850 i Mary Ann Sumner om: 4*. nt Subject: 7 Sunny Knoll Ithaca, NY 14850 July 31, 2011 Dryden Town Board 93 E. Main St. Dryden, NY 13053 Zorike Henderson [zorika @lightlink.com] Sunday, July 31, 2011 3:39 PM Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon Fracking ban Dear Dryden Board Members: A fracking ban is the only way to protect the town's water and other natural resources, its infrastructure, and its budget. We cannot count on the state or federal governments to protect the town's resources or bail the town out financially when the tab from thus technology's fallout comes due. The DEC's revised SGEIS, which exempts the New York City and Syracuse watersheds from fracking while leaving the rest of the state's water at risk, is an indication of how little help Dryden can expect. Unlike the residents of Pejuisylvania, Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, and Wyoming, we have the advantage of xving been forewarned about fracking. racking proponents typically make the false claim that this technology'has been around for many years. In reality, high- volume, slickwater (chemical) fracking is an experiment that has been used in actual field conditions for approximately a decade: http:// w "vNv.washin�Ttonpost.conv'w -o- dvnlcontent/ article /2009/12/02/AR2009120204305 2.html ?sid= ST2009120204375 .. Mitchell Energy started experimenting with it sporadically in the early 1980s. Mitchell could not get anyone in the industry to buy the company or sign onto the new method. Ili 2002, Devon Energy ultimately acquired Mitchell Energy and began Cracking in Texas. Underscoring the newness of the method, aun article in the winter 2005/2006 edition of Oilfield. Review, http : / /N,,ri.vw.slb.comh /media/Files /resources /oilfield rev1ew /orsO54win05 /04 the source for hydraulic.ashx , states: "Clearly, the exploration and production (E &P) industry still has much to learn about hydraulic fractures" and "All hydraulic fracture models fail to predict future behavior precisely, and in many cases, models fail completely, largely because of incorrect information and asstunptions used in the models" (p. 44 for both quotes). Fracking entails excessive trial and error. A famous lawsuit (Coastal Oil & Gas (,,'SA LP v. Garza LnerV Trust) involved subsurface trespass by Coastal Oil & Gas. The fracking company essentially pled that it couldn't help itself because accurate drilling isn't possible. As noted in an article on the lawsuit, portions hi some ways cracking the shale evenly could be thought of as trying to hammer a dinner plate into equal pieces - it's not easy. 1 "' 0 feet or 400 feet," said John S. Lowe; a You may plan a fracture that will go 1,000 feet; and it might go 2,00 professor of energy law at Southern Methodist University's Dedman School of Law. "' A pro- fracking claim that has been made locally is that New York State doesn't have to follow the "anything- s" weak regulatory regime of Pennsylvania. Stricter regulations might help reduce the environmental and public health problems, but they will never be able to solve a fundamentally hazardous drilling method. In addition, however lax the Pennsylvania regulations may be, Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection cited 1, 751 violations in just the first five months of this year: http I /%,%ti�vxw dep state pa us/ dep' deputatel minres/ oilgas` OGInsiectionsViolation slOGlnspviol.htm . The recorded violations are undoubtedly the tip of the iceberg; the DCP is understafF'ed, similar to the inadequate staffing at the DEC. The DEC has said that it will have 17 drilling inspectors stateNA,7 de-- oversee in g potentially thousands of gas wells. Inspectors should be evaluating the cementing job on every gas well casing. Careful cementing is crucial to protecting water and avoiding serious accidents whose consequences may be irreversible. The BP oil spill, for instance, occurred because of a rushed cementing job and poor regulatory oversight. 1 ^racking fluids can easily migrate into groundwater, http: / /lracfocus.orgJ`iag: "}Fracturing fluids can enter a fresh groundwater zone if there is sufficient bottom hole pressure to raise the fluid level from the fractured zone to the fresh groundwater zone, and there is a conduit through which the fluid can flow such as an open annulus between the casing and the formation. They may also enter fresh groundwater if there is a hole in the casing above the depth of the groundwater zone and the cement outside of the casing is not adequate to prevent fluid flow between the casing and the formation. Under normal circumstances hydraulic fiacturing fluid is confined to the inside of the production casing, the formation being treated and nearb)v • formations." "An improperly designed or poorly performed stimulation treatment water zone" (Unexpected Increases in Water Production, Chapter 5, Associated Issues: ;1lanual for the Independent Operator. Rodney R Technology Transfer Council, 2003: ht1p'11NArNvw.os s.ou.edurPTTC x can allow a hydraulic fracture to enter a p. 21. in Produced Heater and Its Reynolds and Robert D. Kiker. Petroleum nwm/produced_water.pdf.). The definition of produced seater, as used in the book cited above; illustrates the risks for drinking water, "Produced water is the name for water that is pumped to the surface concurrently with the extraction of oil; gas, and coal bed methane from underground formations. The water's composition generally includes inorganic salts, hydrocarbons, solids such as sand or silt, metals, dissolved gases, bacteria and other living organisms; and chemicals and additives resulting from production activities. It is; in other words, contaminated-- unpure to the point it is generally unsuitable for either residential or agricultural use." hracking is sufficiently unsafe that Halliburton needs indemnification language releasing it from all liability, including death, loss of water, subsurface trespass, and radioactivity (Ruckdeschel v. Folcon Drilling CoinpanyO -, - .. n.., _ n.�%nnn nnA 1'7 ..'7A ....,I.Prr�nr}acaxlelVLrar�- L.L,Q: httl 2007 -curr . There are signiticant long -term risks of this new drilling method, according to kelarc Durand, professor emeritus of geological engineering at the University of Quebec in Montreal, http: /' NNtebyxo...conil.P,lype- Z tzoxy- plip/0iSvd3d3ILm ]lY2Vilb2916Lm1\v /b S 9ub3R11cv_9raG P s/ZS 1n �IMt/a 5 ni b y2z/aG FsZ S IirfY ttb Xkt/cG9pbnQt/b2 YtdmIUdy1vbi13I W scy I D/zG UtZXhA?IZ JpbWV uJdC lDa UtIb ><9uZ2. 21aXR51.W9MIL N0cnN1jldHVyZ 1 v,+MjE MiLY21OTA40TAYMiQwbl51: *A really important but little kno %vn problem with the exploitation of shale gas is the well's post - exploitation life. This question must be analysed very carefully, for there is an essential element which is of considerable impor(ance in this new industry; this iS the fact that hydraulic fracturing irdtiales the migration of methane in the whole volume of the geologic unit, while only a small amount o f this gas is recovered. The extraction takes place over only a few years, but the migration of the gas, once begun by fracturing, continues at least a thousWid limes loi lger, - . . "Each of the n+ jr r fractures constitutes a small none of great perrrleabilit }+ in tJ1.e shale. The methane and other fluids that arc present will migrate towards the fracture. What has taken millions of years in the case of conventional gas deposits l�4 I be reproduced in a tiny fiactiolr of that. time, and, as all the new fractures are created at the same time, at fast the flow i s strong- 13 ut it falls off vary quickly. More than three quarters of the methane (80% according to the National Energy Board) (ref 1) remains underground at the end of the exploitation. It u�i1] continue to migrate toward the network of fractures and re- pressurize the wells, alter they are closed and abandoned." A tracked w0l is opbrnized to extract Sas but then, at the end of the well's useful life, "to trwisform it into a structure for the diametrically opposite funs #ion, that is, to cantam aie remauling gas - -the ,name well and the fracturing of50 ml III on cubic meters + a concrete plug do"i hole + a soldered steel plate near the surface + some other elemews.. , , "i do not know of ally ei3gineer who ivould put his professional reputation on the line to guarmitee, on closure., *e security for an indefinite number of years of a subterranean reservoir of 50,000,000 m3 [cubic meters ] of ethane }with the current drilling plans; of works which moreover, wiII be uiicared for, tin- inspected and ludden under a camouflabed surface." Lnergy independence is *orth the risks offrack.ing, solve fracking advocates in Dryden have said. But as a number of articles u1 the national inedia have pointed out, gas producers grant to Liquefy and import the gas. For esalriple, a proposed plan for exporting domestic. gas through a liyuef ed natural gas terminal in Oregon is part of nationivide push by gas producers that could h€�vc a "disastrous impact on the price oFnatural gas I' U.S, consumers` htt: llwv� .orconlive,com!businesslindex ,sF12011l071oreon ing terminal plans reve html . `l'he fevered rush of a dangerous drilling method, along with the col -brute lobbying that has made too many stale and federal lawmakers favor industry Over the public -- including forced pooling that severely violates property rightsmY can and should be resisted. Dryden residents have said consistently Over the years that they want Dryden to remain a livable rural area. That goal is lncompatible Mth the massive t.yrpe of lndustrlalizatlori, water and air pollution, loss of 11dlife habitat, scarred land, and overall environmental degradation posed by h=acking. For an idea of the radical transformation that Dryden would undergo if fracking v"Fere al loved, we aerial views of the MarceIIus Shale in Pennsylvania, htt ;11vA w.MarcelIus- sba]e.usiMAR ELLU S -AI - 11. litm, and the Barnett -Shale in Texas; htt : lftexa ,sharnn,com1010101191bamett -shale , mn - aerial - vice -21 ,. The local economy is unlikely to bmcAt from (racking, contrary to What the gas driIIIl,g industry claims about *the ckin;;'s economic benefits, Studies on fracking's eflec�ts on focal econontiies have been sponsored primarily industry and have not been peer reviewed. Fconomist Trhornas Kinnaman of 13ucknell University deckled to review ,six of the indiLstry- funded studies, new ?s'cientist.coinlafticle /mg2I 128193, 400m ec' Ononiic- belefits- of- shalegas- extractionmuneiear,htrnl4. 3 Kinnaniali found that they all contained flaws that exaggerated the benefits of shale gas extraction to local economies, 14losi rely on an economic model called IMPLAN, which supposes, say, that local services such as hotel rooms are going unused until the gay industry comes along t spend money on them. In fact, such spending may displace other consumers} creating no net benefit, K1nmirnan also claims that none oi" the studies Measured all the costs and benefits of extracting shaic c,�is, so could not determine if it really offers a net gain." Frarkirig should riot be .T rvden's suture, sincerely, Lorika �lenderson 4 Mary Ann Sumner [IRS: Peter J_ Kahn [pjk7 cornell.edul ent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 1Q:45 AM To; diary Ann Srtmner Coo Jason Leifer; David Maknr: Stephen telick: Joseph Solomon Subject: fracking hill Dear Nis. Sumner, et. al,, want to register my strong support for the bilk currently being considered to ban horizontal hydrofracking (and other heavy industrial activity) in the Town of Dryden. I have heard all the arguments both against this form of gas extraction and in favor of it (as, no doubt, have you) so it would not be useful for me to cite chapter and verse at this late date. I want only to emphasize one or two points in apposition to those who claim that the ban deprives them of their rights to do what they wish with their property and thereby deprives them of income that is rightfully theirs. All of us residents and landowners have restrictions on what we can do with our property. toning ordinances make this obvious, Local government has a right to deem certain uses of land against the public interest; e.g., l cannot install a gas station on my residentially zoned property, even though I might make some money by doing so. Only recently have we become aware of the tremendous social, economic, and environmental cost of the techno- industrial processes now in use in this new form of mineral extraction_ So, only now have we (the citizens of the town) been able to assemble the facts, marshall the a rguments and come to a considered conclusion that this form of land use is not in the interest of the town 0d the overwhelming maJority of its residents. The small minority of those who are sitting on these windfall gas assets e apparently eager to cash in quickly, perhaps recognizing the rapid fall -off in productivity after early drilling phases. But a zoning ban such as that contem plated will not necessarily forever deprive them of financial ga in. The simple fact is that the technology and the standards enforcement rnechanisms must be greatly improved before extraction of flrlarcelius Shale gas becomes compatible with the lifestyles and livelihoods of current local residents and landowners. And one further point, which I have heard made at a recent Town meeting that I attended: I am a landowner and Town of Dryden taxpayer with rights every bit as valid as those of people complaining about the proposed ordinance(s). I have the right to "the peaceful enjoyment of my property," to be assured of the quality of water that I derive from my well, for drin king, washing, etc., and to the assurance that access to my home awriil not be impeded by battalions of heavy trucks engaged in distributing toxic fluids_ I don't want radioactive fracking refl ux brine dumped an my road ( Ellis Hollow Road) as park of a cheap ice - control process: that endangers my health and that of my family. I don't want to see my already very high local taxes go up to support road and other repairs necessitated by the excessive use by these trucks, I don't want highfer taxes for t h a Increased social services needed by the (non - local) arm ies of fracking workers. I n short, I strongly resent the idea that I should support by my taxes and decreased quality of life the indfal I profits of those whose only virtue has been to have found themselves on a certain piece of land at a certain time in our history. Sincerely, Pete rI Kahn 1565 Ellis Hollow Road 0 I Mau Ann Sumner From, the Russos [godimbit[ frontie met net] Sent: Sunday, July 313 2011 925 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen Ste Iick; Joseph Solorno n Subject: please move forward with the ban on hydrefracking Dear Town Supervisor and Town Board members, I am Waiting to let you know that my family and z are strongly in favor of a ban on hydro (racking. We value the importance of healthy air and water quality too much to see anything that could contaminate these things be allmled to take place in Dryden. We have read many articles about hydrofracking and have listened to many discussions. It has been sad to see people's water sources and air quality became contaminate( in Pennsylvania and we do not want that to happen here. We do not feel that the possible economic gains that may coma from allowing hydrofracking in Dryden out weigh the possible health and environmental risks. we need to protect the basic needs of our environment- clean air and water and hydrofracking contains too many risks. PLEASE continue to work towards a ban on hydrofracking, as Itahca has so wisely done. Thank you for your time and all the work tf at you are doing for our town. Sincerely, Andrea Edwin -Russo 1 Mary Ann Sumner - It omSteven Sisson tspbissen{toxicstargeting_com] nt: Saturday. ,July 30, 2011 9'56 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: ley thoughts on the ban of gas drilling in Dryden I i Mary Ann, 1 wanted to give you my reasons for supporting the ban on gas drilling in the Town of Dryden. 1. Hydrofrae king uses a lot of water which bee omcs contaminated %vith fraeking chemicals. -The frocking water is the biggest environmental issue at present with the hydrofracking process. Lots of contaniii.at'ed wester requires lots of trucks or holding ponds for this water. I'his water then has to be either recycled, which means moving the }eater to the next dulling location or treated, which means moving the water to a waste water treatment plant. Either way it means lots of trick traffic and lots of wear on ro ads at a time when road repair budgets are being slasl.ed. With the nloving of this fruck1ng water, there is increased probabilitie-s ofspi[is acid environmental contamination.. Some of these (racking chemicals arc cancer - causing and Ii-a&ing waste water contains naturally- occurring radioact] vity. Waste eater treatment plants do not Zeno %v how to treat this type of waste. . The risks to surface water are Wo great, - There have been accidents with imj or contamination iri ?enn, } ills happen no matter ]sow careful tl.'o ii gas canrpanies try to be. A spill of fracking water rear fall 40 reek, 6 -Mile Creek or Dryden Lake could ruin these waterways for decades. The risks to ground water are too great. w There have been private drinking water ,4 ells that have been contaminated ith gas. Whether this is lmm the drilling directly or indirectly due to shifting underground soil and rock stmeture is unk -nown but the ability to light water on fire started when the drilling started. Even though the of I &. gas compames arcrue that the hy- &ofractaring is done 1 ini.le underground, the high pressure that causes fi-acturang of rock may cause changes to rack structure acrd thus changes to ground water How even at the shallower depth. of ground water. Underground cracks in drilling well casings could also cause ground water contalmination. In other words, rn.ore study is needed to address these problems with drinking water Wells. 4. Qua]ity of the quiet country life w i I I be affected. - This may be a minor point but with increased industry there is increased xioise_ People live in the Town of Dryden because they enj ay the rural atmosphere with peac e and quiet. Increased noise from truck traffic and industrial activity will wreck the qualit y otlife, S. Aad fin a]ly - the gas isn "t going any where and the cost for that gas is on [y going to go up. - because the L ncrease gas supplies frorxl Pen)l. and other status, the price of naw-al gas has dropped. It seems to 17'iB to make more set.se to wait for 2. reasons - the technology of extracting this gas will only improve and get safer and the price of the gas w11 oDiy be higher in the flnture. There needs to be more study of the technology and find ways to address the shortfalls of tl.is process. This will take time That is why T believe a ban of gas dialling should be done at the current time because of all this uncertainty. Gape my reasons help you with your decisioli. The choice is Disk vs. Profit, some nmv feel the risk is acceptable but I believe the risk is too great. 1 Mary Ann Sumner - From, Morgan [morgankolb gmail.com] Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2011 5:2 3 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Fracking ban My name is Morgan Kolb z am 15 years old and I am strongly in favor of a ban or fra.CkIng in the town of Dryden. Morgan Kolb 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Anne Rhodes [arf1945 @hotmail.com] Sent: Saturday, July 30, 20114:43 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject. I support the ban on hydrofracking in Dryden Hi Mary Ann, I just wanted to go on the record as supporting the proposed ban. I am most concerned about the possible contamination of the water, but also about the negative economic effects industrial drilling might have. At the very least I think we need more time, more information, and better protection from the DEC. The ban will buy us this time, even if it is challenged in court. Thank you for your support of this, Anne Rhodes 91 Ed Hill Rd., Freeville 13068 i 1 Mary Ann Sumner ar m: n [nywallace11@0Mail.com] Sent: Saturday, Ju[y 30. 2011 12.25 PM Tv: Bury Ann Sumner; David Makar; Joseph Solornon; Stephen telick; Jason Leifer Subject: Fracking Bari Dear Board Miembers, I am writing to say that I am in Favor of thie fracking ban. Please vote to pass it. Sincerely, Noah Wallace 1139 Ellis Hollow Rd Ithaca, NY 14850 1 Ann Sumner ►rom: Sent: To: Subject: Thom Baker [thornbaker @yahoo.com] Saturday, July 30, 2011 12:05 PM Mary Ann Sumner Enact a Ban on Hydrofracturing in Dryden To Whom it Mav Concern, I am writing to support a ban on Hydrofracturing v1 Dryden. My concern is not the "hydro" part or the "fracturing" part, but the information that the gas companies do not tell us: the poisons they put into the ground, to stay in the ground. Once the ground and ground water are ruined the area will no longer be a nice place to live. Neither NNrill the area be suitable for tourism. Dryden cannot afford to host hydro.fracturing. Our I- :ighway Department did not have enjough money to keep my street appropriately plowed this winter, making me park at the bottom of the hill and walk the quarter mile through the snow, groceries in arms staight uphill five different times. We don't have the money to repair roads demolished by heavy trucks and machinery making money on the backs of many Dryden taxpayers who will not get a cent from their industry. The underground gas is not going away. We can afford to wait until a safe, efficient mode of extraction i g s invented. Thank you for your time. Thom Baker 10 Sunny Slope Road Music Director, Ithaca Gay Men's Chorus Voice Faculty, The Conununity School of Music and Arts Director, Daytime Chorale, The Conununity School of Music and Arts Coordinator, CSMA First Fridays Chamber Music Series Choir Director and Music Coordinator, First Unitarian Society of Ithaca (607) 227 -0681 E Mary Ann Sumner From: Mary B. Patterson [m ary,b,patterson ( com ell- edu] Sent: Saturday, July 391 2011 9,20 AM To: Flury Ann Sumner Cc: tvrshayaol,com Subjeot: Please vote N0 to fracking In Dryden To the Dryden Supervisors, I ask that you vote No to fratkingfheavy industry irl Dryden, 14Y+ i am retired, age 70, live on Ringwood Roar} and am very concerned For many reasons. 1) road damage, then higher taxes for repair 2) heavy truck trafflic with danger of toxic spills 3) possible damage to water wells from heavy industry drilling, explosions, etc 4) lower property value because of heavy industry zone 5) toxic spills affecting watershed, creeks, Cayuga Lake 6) history of companIes using lawyers to avoid cornpensatxng people who were negatively affected - using big dollars to avoid responsibility Phis list could go en and on. What is the rush? Tire gas %gill still be there 10 -50 years from now. I suspect companz.es i,�ant to get in and take 'their profit before the real costs/damages become evident. Thank you for all your thoughtful consideration of this critical issue. Thank you. Mary B. Patterson 67,3 Ringwood Road 607- 539 -7056 1 Ann Sumner From: Caryn Davies [ca ryn.davies @g mail. comj Sent: Friday, July 29, 20117:17 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: gas drilling in Dryden Dear Dryden Town Board, As the daughter of current Dryden residents (and still a registered voter in Dryden), I am concerned about the legacy you will be leaving me if you allow hydrofi~acking in Dryden. My father bought our house more than 40 years ago. It is the only real home I have ever known. Two of my favorite aspects of coming home from law school in the city are the fresh well water and the quiet nights; they are rejuvenating and relaxing in comparison to the sour New York City water and roaring traffic. Yet the land surrounding our property on three sides is currently leased for bas drilling. I worry that the house I grew up in will cease to be a home when the trucks move in to pollute our water with chemicals and our air with noise. Please consider the neat generation when you vote next week on the ordinance baiuiing gas drilling in Dryden. Many thanks, Caryn Davies 2008 Olympic bold (rowing) 'olumbia Law School '13 arvard College '05 Ithaca High School '00 I Mary Ann Sumner From; Shira Golding [shiragolding cOgmail,com] Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 12:32 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner $abject: Please vote for the gas drilling ban I am writing to express my strong recommendation that you vote to ban gas drilling in Dryden. I would much rather sea our community invest in infrastructure that will support renewable energy production such as wind, solar and geotherm4l. I also think that tremendous measures should be taken to reduce energy constjmption by improving insulation and other strategies. Sincerely, Shi ra shira Golding shiragoldingf&gmail.com http: / /wlgw. s h i.ra ri . corn i Ann Sumner �rom: Sharon Buechel [sharonbuechelgmail,com] ent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 12:44 PM v Mary Ann Sumner subject: in support of a gas drilling f fracking BAN ordinance Dear Ms. Sumner, We are Dryden residents and landowners who are IN FAVOR of a STRONG gas drilling BAN ordinance. We have owned property and lived in Freeville and Dryden since 1979 and are lifelong residents of Tompkins County. We feel that the benefits that some claim might be gained by hydrofracking are FAR outweighed by the negative effects that will surely take place such as water and land pollution, road and bridge damage, decreased tourism, increased noise, traffic problems, and irreversible damage to cur beloved, fragile, and beautiful Finger Lakes area. PLEASE VO'C'E FOR A BAN ON F A KING! We need your continued vigilance on our hehair and for generations to corne, thank you, Caron and Richard Buechel W 133 Southwoxth Rd Dryden, NY 13053 sheronbuechel@ 6074423-26d7 iI.C:om 1 i Dryden Safe Energy Coalition D E ) fo Henry S. Kramer 1524 Ellis Follow Road Ithaca, New York 14850 (.607) , 75.3635, Fax (611137) 275m3671 9Eyde� glmaJ1.com August t, 2011 Dryden l-awn Supervisor Members, Town Boord By E -Mail and hand delivery. to Town Clerk As ii appears that the Dryden Tawri Board will be voting are a roan .lOa energy developineni bon on August '?, 20111 this to present DS E C 's position, to amplify Henry banner's prior statement, and to put the Board an formal notice that if it passes a toial energy d velopmerit bare it will be engaging in 00 irrg prospective violations of constitutional rights, federal, and state law-, It the Board anaQls thO Oropos d &dlihanc it may subject the Town not only to Iitigaiion .costs but also t.a potentially hundreds of millions of dollars of taking liability, which would ultirnef ly have to be borne by the taxpayers, The Guard should not take lightly the risk of such potential liability. Whether or not the Board believ s ill may soirn low legally prevail, the Board shouid w ig1) the cost to -benefit ratio of adopti'no this barb. Even assurning, for O(gulrretlt only, that the passibility of success Were 50 -50, can the Board risk the chance of 'a nine figure liability Not recrsonabl . First. the ban' would violate the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments cf the United States Constitution and constitute a tokin :g requiring just ao pe.nsation. The ban entirely confiscates mineral rights fo an estimated value of $175 -million (vcaluafiom may vary, but the Sig���ific.a�nce of the sum involved remains) , not including the additional val -ue of royaliy rightsI also likely in the many millions and the costs, of litigation. Ali ernaf ively,: the Board.'s. action may be viewed as a 100% confiscatory flax On wealth in mineral rights, a tax outside the Board's powers, not authorized by and preempted by state law. Board mfDmbers have fiduciary responsibilities, Oliven the magnitude of pot n-tial do magLas and the ouisized legal risks, it j$.s';mply not fis ally.prudent behavior to adopt this bai�. Second. the ban would be in violation of thestate's. preeri7pticn of the regulation of drilling. In the iMay Dryden newsletter, the Town Supervisof so 491 v acknowledged. Legal authorities give ban ordinances little chance of surviving court challenge. The wiser course, when faced with legal doubt, is not to act. Third, the ban as a zoning ordinance is in violation of many of the holdings of the New York Court of Appeals in the Udell zoning case, a copy of which was previously supplied the Board. Read the case and it should guide the Board. Fourth, the ban is ultra vices, that is outside the authority of a town board. There is no authorization in state law for the Town to enact a complete ban, on the contrary Town action is preempted. An Article 78 proceeding may follow. Fifth, a Town may not, by local. ordinance, nullify, or make entirely nugatory, state created and recognized mineral rights and general laws. To do so would, in effect,, nullify state law and state created rights within Dryden_ If towns could do this, they could pick and choose which state laws would apply. Sixth, section 5 of the proposed ban which would have the Dryden ban trurnp state and federal permits and actions, as a matter of black letter law, is invalid. It is reasonable to conclude that the Town Board will be knowingly attempting to override and destroy constitutional, federal, and state rights. Seventh, the ban is discriminatory. It shifts the entire alleged environmental protection costs onto land and mineral rights holders instead of the general population. This is not on incidental shift but an overwhelming burden, extinguishing millions of dollars of thousands of individuals' property rights. If such can action is taken, it must be a general charge on the population of the Town. The survey on which our comprehensive plan is built calls for compensation for takings. Further, such compensation was provided when the Town bought development rights, recognition of the injustice of unpaid taking. Eighth, adoption of this ban would cloud the land titles of thousands of Dryden residents who have signed leases on 41 % of Dryden land. A ban is a classic force event and may prevent these leases from ever expiring. A ban could thus condemn many Dryden residents to land sale and mortgage difficulties for years to come, a harsh and selective punishment. Ninth, the Town may not be insured for any act it takes which it knows, or reasonably should know, is illegal. The Town is notified it will be in violation of constitutional and legal rights if it enocis the ban. Tenth, if Town Board members, having notice, violate constitutional and legal rights, they may lose their qualified immunity and be subject to suit in their personal (possibly uninsured) capacities. i T In conC.IUSion, the Town should offO�eatively cinflci r� pafe that fed rat andlor state. ro.uri, ac'lion against it is highly probably, if not virtually certain, on one or more of the above cited or a her clOirns. You cannot, exting ish hundreds of millions of dollars at property values held by thousands of residents arid separate mineral rights held key both in rind out of slIcate people without an itppa ing legca;l a0ions. The energy industry has its own causes of action and may also sue. It is Highly proboble that this -overly broad bah, as wjitt n, will have unforeseen or unintQrided consequences. For similar reason, the County Legislature deferred action. on a road low, Thee more sensible alfernative and responsible fiduciary response is to deter ony action on a bean until loan challenges elsewi�ere are litigated. Certainly; the Kale is for from ready to begin perrt�i.t-ting wells, so there is no need for haste. You have a u t a inirnm into 201,2; if' not longer. The Town should take notice that a bnh i-s in.c0n.s.istent wIth er v.ironirnentaI advocates' position favoring the develapiraent of natural gas under the Kyo fo prc�IocoIs. It M.aISO ihconsisterif for the Town and individuals to use energy from elsewhere while refusing to allow its regulated d velopm nMocaily. And, failure to develop dornes#ic energy means foreign energy dependence, foreign wars to protect vital energy interests, and the sapping of.revenues the gavernm nt could use to pay debt grid PrOvi.de programs. DSE 's Mission is to offer balanced, data driven information can safe energy development, to logically and numerically evalOate benefit -to -risk ra#ios, free. of emotional bias or ideology, and to bring together people interested in an n01YIE a C al approa . ch to energy issues, ban does not serve to meet this mission. It does not allow for a "middle way" in which there is lawful, safe, regulated en f9y development. Legally, we believe a-lotal lean is an u.nnecessory t)i h risk strategy for the Town and which'in its uncompensated takings is unjust. The Board is now on notice_ If is DSE 's hope the Board will do the prudent thing and recognize there is bo1-17 division of opinion in Dryden and signEficant_ largo scale dollar risk. Both drilling ilhouf r .eguiation and refusal to drill are equally extreme solutions. Weopposeboth, Please opt for deliberate moderation and do not adopt in haste this radical to#cil ban. .din . � rely yours, Dryden Safe Energy Coalition By Henry S. Kromer. l'racy Marisa • Mary Ann Sumner From: acengst @gmaii.com on behalf of Adam Engst [ace @tldbits.com] Sent. Friday, July 28, 2011 10:12 AM To: Adam Engst Cc: Mary Ann Sumner, David Maker, Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon; Tonya Engst; Herbert J Engman Subject, Thought about Dryden watershed pointing toward a drilling ban Hi folks, Given that the Town of Ithaca has passed a ban on gas drilling, and that there is no drilling currently in the City of Ithaca, and that the Town and City water supplies are fed in part from the Town of Dryden, wouldn't it make sense for Dryden to make its plans compatible with Ithaca and ban drilling? Surely there's some coordination that's necessary to ensure the safety of upstream drinking supplies for downstream users? This gets back to the whole "what's special about New York and Syracuse ?" argument - it would seem that all citizens deserve the same protections, and whether or not the gas industry has managed to get itself exempted from the Clean Air and Water Acts, it seems clear that the actions of one can affect the many, and even the State is acknowledging that with NY and Syracuse - we should as well. cheers... -Adam 1 Ida Ann Sumner From: Jackyoungbros,com Sent: Friday, July 29, 2811 4:47 AM 7o: Salary Aran Sumner subject: Gas Drilling in Dryden I'm writing as a Dryden landowner to express my concern about recent proposals to restrict gas drilling in the town. my family-has had nimerous wells drilled on our properties in Pannsylvania over the years, and have never had any problems of the sort people are worrying' about locally, once the hells have been drilled and the locations restored, you hardly even know they're there, But the financial benefits they provide the area remain. And so do the environmental advantages that gas has over it's competing fuels. Nhat I find sad abc ut the current debate is that those who claim to be environmentalists are actually pushing the area towards a greater dependence on strip "Mined coal. Even a WIPIBY can't escape the impacts this wiil.havei on global. warming. Does Dryden really want to be partly to blame for that? perhaps as importantly for some peOPle, any ban on drilling or fracing will prevent geoth erinal wells from being drilled, as many of those are completed by a process much like hydrafracing. And you risk effectively condemning all the oil. and gas rights in the totian a$ Well, which could be a big financial, liability for the local gaverriment. As a long -time environmentalist and supporter of natural gas, I've been stunned by the lynch - 000b attitude that's developed towards natural gas locally in the last year or tiro. As a Dryden landowner, I urge yaw not to get caught up by it John Young 69.2_3.2 95.64 acres I e-- L 6 00 00 ej UU IIJOGI . . . . I I-Ic I I I I 1 i 1 f, ��rwnuc . IIJOGI . . . . I I-Ic I I I I 1 i 1 f, - " I. _ _ i i it � ,��4 �'__ � � - .. � - v�'-'• '� t 5 • 5 ' �r -L 1 1' u .II, ,i.'L _ a 'LL' • 5 l� ' �r 1' u .II, ,i.'L _ a 'LL' t r �y y 4 . r 1 5 l� ' �r 1' l� •' - f - � _ .. •I .. I I � -'J . \*�� fir' J� ! —� f' � n� I r } L •w.�- e 1'1 1 i } i I 1 ' I -I i �I .. F I I '6 i i ' *r u .II, ,i.'L _ a 'LL' •' - f - � _ .. •I .. I I � -'J . \*�� fir' J� ! —� f' � n� I r } L •w.�- e 1'1 1 i } i I 1 ' I -I i �I .. F I I '6 i i May Ann Sumner 0rom: Marie McRae [mmmcraeQuno.com] ent: Monday, August 01, 2011 10:51 AM 0: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Good Morning in Dryden Good morning Mary Ann, and welcome to a peaceful August 1 st in Dryden. The Milky Way was a gorgeous sight last night in the dark sky out here in the hills. I am thinking about how you have worked to ensure that this date in 2012, and beyond, will be as peaceful as today is - without drilling trucks and lights and noise and attendant industrial pollutions - as you have brought us to the brink of having a ban on those activities in Dryden. I look forward to being in the room with you tomorrow as you make your vote on the zoning amendment that can protect us. I've learned a lot in the past year and one of those things is that democracy and freedom ain't as easy as I used to think it was. Thank you for your hard work. I look forward to working with you, going forward, to ensure that the protection I hope you put into place tomorrow will remain there, for all of us, into the future. Marie McRae 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Tim Gallagher [twg3 corne[I,edu] Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2011 fi ;56 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Mokar; Jl ison Leifer; Stephen Ste Iick; Joseph Solornofl Subject: Ban hydrofracking - - - Pleasel I am writing to strongly 5uppart a ban on hydrofracking in the Town known at this time about the potential harmful effects on our local, becomes contaminated by the chemicals used in this process or other the shale that might be released during the fracturing process. And the picturesque rural nature of our area destroyed by industrialYsc things that have already taken place in Pennsylvania do not make me natural gas extraction companies have our best interests at heart. Thank you, Tim Gallagher 31 Main Street Freeville, NY 13068 1 of Dryden. Not enough is Water supply if it chemicals contained in 7 would also hate to see ale gas extraction. The feel confident that these Mary Ann Sumner From: Gretchen Ryan [glr5( melf,edu] 0ent. Tuesday, August 02, 2011 1;41 PM 0: Wary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban Hydrofracking Dear Supervisor Mary Ann Sumner, •1 fully support the ban ors hydrofra ckin C because I believe that our land and water are far too precious to risk with this procedure. While the financial gain may be enticing, it Will not sustain our future generations as well as our wonderful land and water can. Sincerely, Gre-kchen L. Ryan, homeowner in the Town of Dryden 9 Cardinal Drive 7 Mary Ann Sumner From: Ari Moore [arimoore gmail.com] sem Tuesday, August 02, 2011 2:29 PM Tv: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Please, vote for the gas dulling ban' Dear Supervisor, Please help us by vo'king 'to ban gas drilling in Dryden. Fey partner and I recently bought j home I've seen, I'm con inced that natural g that if it happens in our community, it beautIrL+Ul place uninhabitable. Instead, contribute to clean and renewable wind, here and hope to have children. Based on the evidence as dr:illing 1!, not a safe practice, and am worried will poison our water and sail and air-, and make this Dryden could reduce energy use, and invest in and 5alar, and geothermal solutions We the people really need your help to ensure that ou,r communitV retains its autonomy from this exploitative industry. Thank you for reading my letter Peace to you and yours, Ari Ari Moore - ari @shirari.com h-tite I ZI 5hirari . com "When individuals join in a cooperative venture, the pager generated far exceeds what they could have accomplished acting individually." - Buckm,inster Fuller I Mary Ann Sumner rom. Carol Chase [cchase1971 @aol.com] ent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 1:08 PM o: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Ban on Hydrofracking We are in favor of a ban on hydrofracking & urge The Dryden Town Board Members to vote for this ban. signed, Richard & Carol Chase 52 Yellow Barn Rd, Freeville, IVY 13068 607 - 844 -4386 11 Mar Ann Sumner From: Hilary Lambert [hilary� lambert yahoo,com] Sent Sunday, July 31, 2011 10;17 Ail To: Mary Ants Surnner; Joseph Sotomon; Steve Stefick: Jf son Leifer; David Makar, drydenrac googiegrowps,com ubjec#: Comment re proposed ordinance ... MARCELL US AIR FIVE : Aerial photos of Marcelfus Shale gas production Dear Supervisor Mary Ann Sumner and Dryden Town Board: Please see the link below. to view )une 2011 photos from a recent flight act iv�tze5 going on right now just to our south ire Pennsylvania. Count resident and landowner who does not want this to happen in our town. I please vote in favor of the gas drilling ordinance on Tuesday August 2 Hall). Sincerely yours, Hilary Lambert 1676 Hanshaw Road Ithaca (Dryden) NY 14850 - - - -- original Message---- - From: sustainabl eotsego- ownerLplis,ts.riseup.net fmailto: 5usta7. nableatse�o- ow�ner�llists.riseu�.net1 Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 9;37 AM To; Richard Averett Subject: [sustainableotsego] MARCCLLUS AIR FIVF production htttp: l/ www .marcellus- shale.us /MARCELLUS- AYR -V.htm over gas production me in as a Dryden ask that you all (7 pm, Dryden Town On Behalf Of Richard Averett Aerial photos of Marcellus Shale gas MARCELLUS AIR FIVE takes you on an early -June 2011 flight over Marcellus Shale gas production actiVities in southwestern Pennsylvania and the panhandle of West Virginia. Enjoy your flight! Aerial photos of (racking, wastewater - Impoundments, compressor stations, and active drilling operations, as well as newly excavated drilling pads and recently completed Marcellus Shale gas wells. i Mary Ann Sumner 40 roar: Patty Mlliai-d ent: Thursday, July 1, 2011 8:03 AM o: Sambi Aver+; David Makar Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon; Mary Ann Sumner #eve S #elrck Subject: F : Town of Dryden contact: comment Forwarding to you from the website - it is signed. Patty Millard Deputy Town Clerk Town of Dryden (697) 844 -8888 ext. 211 93 East Main Street Dryden, NY 13053 Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:30 pm - - - -- Original Message - - -�- From: Susan Yanoff mailto :susan.yanoffpus.i�rmy.mill Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:02 PM To: Patty Millard subject: Town of Dryden Contact: comment TO: General rorn san Yanoff usan.yanoff(�us.�rmy.mil Message: To the Town Board re: The hdrofracking ban: I spent about 45 Settlement 1. 1 do not 2. 1 do not Road. minutes at the Public I support the ban on want to risk contaminated want the 3, I do not want gas If you can guarantee drilling. Otherwise, Thank you. Sue Yanoff Wearing this hydrof racking water. evening (July 20 ). I live on Irish for~ three main reasons: gas drilling to have a negative effect on the environment, drilling to negatively impact my property value. that any or all of the above will NOT happen, go ahead and allow gas please ban it in the town of Dryden. Sent from (ip address): 74.32. (74 -32- 165- 10.dsll- nrwc.n .frc Date/T11 July 21, 2011 1:02 Coming from (referer): htt (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows AET CLR 33.30729; NET CLR 3 165.10 ntiernet.net) am dryden.ny.us /contact -us Using (user agent) NT 6.1; Win64; x54; Trident/4.9; .NET CLR .0.30729; Media Center PC 6.9; MDDC) I ftzillaj4.0 2.0.50727; St_CC2; Appendix 11 —D Pre .Hearing Witten Comments were received from. Edwards, Jan Miner. Dan ?e m Marvha Meader, Am %nub \ Al. 2i er, Nancy Shay, Jan Pay n «. H6 I Kosch m«G*awy]e, (=I ir, �LrV He &5|o! % Cinb h Nari Schmidt, Oskair timid! D |m B!�%TrB Hc,mTneTL=(-'joodre,au, Sue e B aI E 3,Eobvt &Imp 7wh ] cc [ S% EJ] Bm4 Jack GAIe,]H EoHn % Terezk a ana, Norman I C6%k!ll Wre.ge, 2mF Heist, Bonney, Ji a Dpi Peer Farmer, GiU> Clougherty, 2 e Gu±h»% ml th hw 2g% Peter U,LM Robertson, Martha Wgm%]m§ Cif |lam DA ni Dcborah quod«& a halle P t Paula I,Iittner, Todd Kelly, ] i@E± Chri@ ophar Barn ett, W *ia, Phillips) Ellen p\ Adam &T Wood, Mar ]o Harvey, Jay efer, John & Patti S-]32% Katherine Nl7mir,David &owqet m, Mary Raimondo, &otli m Gregory, Pcter O$,Sm e+&yobd d tOL& Gm daA of New York . Anderson, Craig ,Craig T rwDi EEred Ryan, Carlton & Jean r£deAQ Emails Received I Ma Anri Sumner From: ,bane Edwards �jeclwa[dslfror�tiemek.net] Sent% Thursday, .June 09, 2011 90;51 AM To; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Zoning ordinance 1) ear5upery [so r: Please pass a no frack zoning ordinance NOW We need to act quickly to protect our environment and quality of life, Thank you for all your work for the Town of Dryden. Jane Edwards I Foothill Road FreeviIlei NY 18068 J Mary Ann Sumner EEENWNNEEN� -- From. Sent: To. Subject: Tues. 6.14.2011 Dan Mittler (dm68 @come11.edu) Tuesday, June 14, 2011 11:47 AM Mary Ann Sumner Fracking Good Morning Dryden Supervisor, I am in favor of a strong defensible NO Frocking ordinance, as per the template prepared by attorneys Helen and David Slottje passed NOW. Thank you ...................Dan. Dan Mittler Cornell University Mechanical & Aerospace 218 Kimball Hall Ithaca, New York 18450 Engineering 1 Work: 607 255 -9172 Cell: 607 227 --7393 Email: dm68 @cornell.edu Fax: 607 255 -2011 Mary Ann Sumner From: Martha Ferger DhteMBr@pnl_net] Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 10:47 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Joseph Soloman; Stephen stench; Jason Leifer Subject: Heavy Industrial uses ban To M . Sumner and all the Town ,Board members: I °d IIk15 to add another thought to the discussion of'the frackirig bait proposal for Wednesday night, When we go out to buy auto or homeowners or any other kind ofingurance, we have to balance added layers of protection against increasing costs. In our case, however, addition of the heavy industry ban language does not cost anything extra, so why not do it? En all the discussions I have read, f have not seem any reason given far 'NOT adding that language, Very compeent lawyers whose devotion to the welfare of au r town is unqu esti tined have preferred different approaches. Since they are not mutually exclusive, as I undumaid it, why not take them all and be gratefut7 With gratitude also for the enormous amount Of time and effort you tiave alt put into finding solutions to these unwelcome problems, Sincerely, bdardia Ferger R Ma_ Ann Sumner From: Amara meatier (ameaderB gmaILcom) Sent: Monday, June 43, 2011 11;03 PM Tom Mary Ann Sumner CC: David Makar; JaSepi� olarrron; Stephen Stelick; Jason Lenr Subject: no fracking ordinance = NOW1 Hello Mary Ann and fellow Dryden Town Board Members � I am writing in support of our board passing a strict NO 1~rackhig cirdinance as soon as possible - especially before the coming election, I do not trust Brno Sch3ckel (whether he's married to Ask Amy, or not) as far as I cc-uld throw him, and believe we must have something significant in place BEFORE any possibility arises that might put him in Power. I think lie's the kind of man who would sell the town right out from under us and then try to make us believe it was inevitable. A future devastated by ubiquitous drilling is not inevitable, but we have to tape action and move this. effort ahead, NOW, Many thanks for the forward tllimking work you all have done to daft. Y6u have made me proud of our town t Jane Meader/ 59 Pal nearltd / Freeville i Mary Ann Sumner From: Al Vaught [ala#dryden gmail,00m] Seri: Monday, ,lung 13, 2011 10;26 PM To: David Makar; Jason Leifer; Joseph Soloman; Mary Ann Sumner, Stephen StelICk Dc: Martha Fenger; Be #sy Subject: Comprehensive Ban oiGgh Impact [nduslrihl Uses including { ydra- frackln Attachments: Dryden Zoning DRAC_HIIU_Prapasal[21,di ox Dear Dryden Board Members, I recently witoessed first hand indusLrial hydromfincking in nonChern PennsyIvania when my brotlier,in -law, who lives there, took Erne On a tour of drilling sites near his home. If what I saw was allowed In the town of Dryden it would destroy our bea�iTji'u[ conuuwmriy. I ain concemed that the narro focUs of lire simple barn before the board crea#es a risk of being overturned by New York coum- Therefoce 18olongl support the attached 11nguage to stretigtlten sLIZIPIC ban b}- addressing tlme fill1 rmiige ofnegatnre ( CCts and no [Gus uses i}'�11�E1 industrial jjydro- Racking brir7gs to cons- munities larhore it is praacticod, Sincerely, Al Vought 1 ij Rationale for Addina.a Prohibition nst High Imyact Ind ustn*aI Use There are three major reasons why it is very important and beneficial to add a prohibition against High Impact Industrial Uses. Two have to do with the Town's position in regard to defending the legality of the new prohibitions_ The other has to do with comprehensiveness of the protection that will be afforded by these new Section 2104 prohibitions. 1. Due Process Violation The numbers (1) and () prohibitions in the proposed new Section 2104 ate, by their natum prohibitions with respect to a particular industry, the gas industry. By focusing on a particular industry, the prohibition runs the risk of being ruled invalid as a due process violation. Being ruled a due proce.ss violation is probably the biggest fear of potential invalidity of the Town's new proposed amendment. To avoid a oourt ruling of a due process violation, any outright pr ()hibitiorI must be narrowly tailored to the harm perceived. Although the Town's new proposal nmkes every attempt to do Just that, it remains open to court, interpretation if ever so challenged by the well funded lawyers for the gas industry, fn contrast, by its very defirution, the prohibition of high impact industrial uses Focuses only on the harms, or impacts. Indeed those harms are the very test of whether a use is considered a }sigh impact industrial use, By focusing on those harms instead of focusing on a particular industry, this prohibition avoids the whole issue of a due process violation_ Thus e�;en if the number (1) and (2) prohibitions were ruled invalid as due process violations, the hinh impact industrial use prohibition would stand. 2. Authority Violation The numbers (1) and (2) prohibitions in the proposed new Section 2104 could be ruled a prohibition of a business, the business of gas drilling. If so, the new section is open to a challenge that the Town has no statutory authority over that business_ Unlike the business of mining, which NYS Town Law (section 1 30(23 )1 specifically alIows towns to regulate, there is no such statutory authority for toivris to regulate a drilling business. And unlike JAYS General City Law { section 20(] 3) (McKinney) which grants cities the authority to regulate businesses, there is no corresponding NY S Town law. So if gas drilling is identified as a business, as opposed to a land use, then there is a legal question as to the Town's authority to prohibit the business. Here again the high impact L ndustrial use approach prohibits land use impacts, as opposed to prohibiting the gas business, By doing so, this prohibition avoids the whole issue of the town's authority to regulate the gas drilling business. Thus even if the number (1) and (2 ) prohibitions were ruled irIvaiid as an authority violation, the high. impact industrial use prohibition would stand. 3. Comprehensive Protection for the Town In addition to prohibiting gas dri lling itself, the Town's new prohibitions proposal makes every aftempt to protect Dryden residents from each of the accessory processes of the gas drilling industry. That is, the wording is crafted specifically to apply to compressor stations, pipe yards, storage facilities, waste disposal activities, and several other such accessory processes. However, there's always the possibility that we may have missed anticipating same accessory processes, 'Furthermore, as gn industry technology changes in the future, there may be new accessory processes that no one has considered yet_ By its nature, this approach to prohibiting gas drilling mast anticipate each such accessory process and craft wording to protect against it In contrast, the li' impact industrial use prohibition protects against the impacts of the industry, thereby avoiding the need to anticipate each and every accessory process. (Tn fact, even if 611 or some other currently unanticipated natural resource were discovered in a local geologic .formation, this approach has the advantage that it would protect us from the harms that may he introduced by that natural resource extraction industry as well_) Thus the addition of the hiah impact industrial use 1)r0hibition acts as a catch -all, to he sure that we're providing more comprehensive protection, Proposed ,addition to Scetion 2104 W Prohibited Uses "Section 2104, prohibited Uses, (1) — as already proposed by .7 o n j6wrd ( ) - as akady proposed by TOIAF n Board 3) Prnhibition against all High Impact Industrial 0ses High Impact Industrial arses are incompatible fth the Town ofDryden's Comprehensive Plan, Defined Terms / Additions to Definitions Relating to Prohibited Uses lusted in proposed $ 2104 Belowmmgulatory Concern radioactive Material. Radioactive mati l in a quantity or of a level that is distinguishable from background (as that phrase is defined at 10 CF R §20,1003), but which is below the regulation threshold established by arty regulatory agency otherwise having jurisdiction over such material in the Towr1_ Deleterious substance, Any of the following in any form, and whether or not such items have been excepted or exempted from the coverage of any federal or state environmental protection laws, or have been excepted from statutory or regulatory definitions of ` °industrial waste," "hazardous," "toxic," and whether or not such substances are generally eharacterfze,d as waste, a, below - regulatory concern ratiiaactive material, or any radioactive material which is not below - regulatory concern, but which 1a I fact not being regulated by the regulatory agency otherwise having jurisdiction over such material in the Town; b. crude oil or natural gas drilling fluids; C. crude oil or natural gas exploration, drilling, production or processing wastes; d_ crude oil or naturai gas drilling treatment wastes (such as oils, frac fl uids, produced water, brine, flowbarcic, sediment and/or any other liquid or semi "liquid material); e. solution mitring brine or mineral brines; f any chemical, waste oil, waste emu isified oil, mud, or sediment that was used or produced in the drilling, development, transportation, processing or refitting ofcrude oil or natural gas; g. soil contaminated its the drilling, transportation, processing or refining of crude ail or natural gas; h, drill cuttings from crude oil or natural gas wells; i, any wastes =odated with the eVloT at10 J6 drilling, production or treatment of crude oil or natural gas; j, waste from the extraWon or processing of ores and minerals, including slag, mud, ash, and process waste water' and waste solids; anchor k_ cement kiln dust waste_ This definition specifically intends to includes some w&stes that may otherwise be classified as "solid wastes which are not hazardous wastes" under 40 CYR § 261,4(b). This definition does not include (i) animal manure andlor recognmable and non- recognizable food wastes, or (i1) storage of farm generated waste, Develoilment Project. Dever rnezlt ects include but are not 11,,r d to. a. the erection, construction, enlargement, alteration, or improvement of any building or structure; b. installation of heating equipment; C, surface disturbance, land filling, excavation, grading, parking lot construction or other disturbances to the natural or existing topography or vegetation of the site results from any of the following: (i) the placement of one thousand (1000) square feet or more of impervious surface, or (ii) alteration of the site's ground coverage by a volume of more than five thousand (5000) square feet; d. exploration, mining, or extraction of materials; e. demolition of structures or buildings; or f. change in use or intensity of use. A project shall not be considered a development groject if it is one or a combination of the following: a. surface disturbance resulting from an agricultural activity; b. Replacement in kind only; c. Interior construction, which does not change the intensity or the type of existing usage; d. Infrastructure maintenance only. Exempted Vehicle. Any of the following: (a) vehicles for agricultural use, (b) school buses or other mass transit buses, (c) emergency vehicles and vehicles otherwise used in connection with public safety uses, (d) military vehicles driven by active duty military personnel, or (e) vehicles used in the construction, repair or maintenance of state, county, or Town roads, other municipal facilities or property. Explosive Materials. Substances capable of undergoing decomposition or combustion with great rapidity, involving much heat and producing a large volume of gas. The reaction products fill a much greater volume than that occupied by the original material and exert an enormous pressure, which can be used for blasting and for propelling. Examples include T. dynamite, nitroglycerin, and ammonium nitrate. Flammable. A solid, liquid or gas that will ignite easily and bum rapidly. Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. The weight specified by the manufacturer as the maximum load weight (truck plus cargo) of a vehicle. Heavy Truck. A truck having a gr ss vehicle weight rating of twenty six thousand (26,000) pounds or more. . - igh- Impact Truck Any of the following criteria: (a) any truck whose width, inclusive of load, is more than ninety -six (96) inches; or (c) a heavy truck, whether or not loaded with cargo. Examples of high- impact trucks include, but are not limited to, vehicles or machines capable of lifting, altering or transporting large quantities of materials, earth or stone or otherwise capable of performing large -scale work. loaders, backhoes, bulldozers, concrete mixing and pumping trucks, dump trucks, well drillers, well servicing rigs, earth scrapers, pile drivers, earth moving equipment and cranes. 1-Iigh- impact truck does not include exempted vehicles. .High Impact Industrial Use. A development project for an industrial use or industrial operations that are more likely than not to generate or involve any four (4) or more of the following impacts in the Town at any time during such use or operation: a. combined total surface disturbance of more than two (2) acres of land; b. the presence, production, collection, handling, manufacture, use, storage, transfer or disposal of any deleterious substance; c. hi - impact truck traffic; d, an operation that, whether due to its nature or to a desire or need by the operator to employ financial resources most efficiently, or otherwise, is usually not limited to typical work days and morning to early evening hours, but rather instead is often conducted at any and all times of the day and night, and with either truck traffic entering or leaving the development project site, or other noise, vibrations or light that extends beyond the property boundaries between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.; e. open air industrial use; f, open air storage; g. flammable or explosive materials are present, used, produced, stored or disposed of; h. a private electric op wer generation facility, L the sequestering, water use of five hundred thousand (500,000) or more gallons of water; j. construction or use of more than forty five thousand (45,000) square feet of impervious surface; k. construction or use of staging facility; or 1. construction of gipthries, roadways and other infrastructure to move product and materials to and from the proposed project site. High - Impact Truck Traffic. Any one of the following: a. more than one hundred (100) one -way trips by high - impact trucks to or from the proposed develo rp nent project site that travels over any public highway within the Town between the hours of eleven p.m, and six a.m. (other than trips solely confined to State Route 13 between the Town of Dryden line where Route 13 enters the Town and the intersection of State Route 13 with Lower Creek Road) ; or b. more than one thousand (1 000) one -way high - impact truck trips to or from the proposed development gWject site during any three hundred sixty five (365) day period during the duration of the proposed use. Industrial Use. Developmentp_ oiect, or production, assembly, harvesting, or manufacturing operation, requiring machinery and equipment. Does not include: (a) agricultural use, (b) residential use, (c) commercial use, (d) telecommunication facilities or communication transmission towers, (e) wind turbines, windmills or similar structures that do not release dust, dirt, fly ash, odors, fumes, or vapors or gases that could be injurious to human health or to the environment, (f) gasoline station or (g) public safety use. Intensity. The combination of factors such as any construction, reconstruction, use of a building, structure or other land use activity which results in an increase in the volume of traffic, the amount of required off - street parking, the hours of operation, the size of the use, noise, dust, odor, vibration, glare, smoke, waste, the need for municipal or other facilities serving the site, or the effect of soils on the site associated with a particular use that deternunes the potential impact of the proposed use. Impervious Surface. Any material or surface that substantially reduces or prevents the infiltration of water into the ground, including areas covered by buildings, conventionally surfaced roads and highways, driveways and parking lots, and sidewalks. Non - regulated Pipeline. Those pipelin es that are exempt or otherwise excluded from regulation under federal and state laws regarding pipeline construction standards or reporting requirements. Specifically includes production lines and gathering lines. Open Air Industrial Use. An industrial use that is not conducted in an enclosed structure and poses the potential for release of Rallution via groundwater, surface water, and air exposure pathways. Open Air Storage. An industrial use that includes storage outside of an enclosed structure of raw materials, components, equipment, products, by- products, waste, deleterious substances, chemicals or other materials, either as a primary activity, or as an accessory use to an industrial_ use or incidental to another industrial activity or use. Pipeline. All parts of those physical facilities through which oil, gas, liquids in transportation (including pipes, valves and other equipment and appurtenances attached to pipes and other equipment such as drip stations, vent stations, pigging facilities, valve box, transfer pump stations, measuring and regulating equipment, yard and station piping, and cathodic protection equipment) pass whether or not laid in public or private easement or private right of way within the Town_ This includes, without limitation, gathering lines production lines, and transmission 1 Ines, Private Electric Power Generation Facility. One or more power generators of more than one thousand (1,000) horsepower in the aggregate, fueled by diesel, oil, gas, propane or other fossil fuel, the primary function of which is the provision of electricity to an industrial use. Production .Line, or Gathering Line. Any system of pipelines (and other equipment such as drip stations, vent stations, pigging facilities, valve box, transfer pump station, measuring and regulating equipment, yard and station piping, and cathodic protection equipment), used to move oil, gas, or liquids from a point of production, treatment facility or storage area to a transmission line, which is exempt from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's jurisdiction under section I (b) of the Natural Gas Act, and which does not meet the definition of a `Major utility transmission facility" under the Public Service Law of New York, Article 7, §120(2)(b). Pollution. The contamination or other diminution of the physical, chemical or biological properties of land, water, or air, including a change in taste, color, turbidity or odor, and including a discharge of any liquid, gaseous, solid, radioactive material or other substance on land, water or air, that will, or is likely to, create a nuisance or render such land, water or air harmful, detrimental or injurious to humans, animal life, vegetation, or property, or to the public health, safety or welfare. Radioactive 'Material. Material in any form that emits radiation, but only if such material has been moved from its naturally occurring location, through an industrial process. Such material is "radioactive material" for purposes hereof; whether or not it is otherwise exempt from licensing and regulatory control pursuant to the NYS Department of Labor, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Transportation, or any other regulatory agency and whether or not such radioactive material or is considered below- reoulatgry concern radioactive material. Radiation. The spontaneous emission of particles (alpha, beta, neutrons) or photons (gamma) from the nucleus of unstable atoms as a result of radioactive decay. Sea mestering Water Use_ Water that is sequestered from the natural hydrologic cycle. e hlesterin Ater us does not include water that has evaporated, transpired, been consumed by humans or livestock, used for irrigating crops, or otherwise returned to the atmosphere or incorporated into food products. Surface Disturbance. Any man -nhade change in improved or u-n improved Land sub - surface and surface, including but not limited to; construction, external repair, land disturbing activity, grading, road building, pipe laying, clearing, grubbing, dredging, graduig, excavating, extracting, exploration, stockpiling, paving, terming, soil disturbance, placement offlll, or storage of equipment or materials in pits, ponds or detention facilities. The scope of surface disturbance includes all activities that are necessary or cariventent for the development rv'ect that is being undertaken, such as associated ulfrastructure developments including Pipeline , access roads, Utility transmission facilities, drainage ditcJhes and the litre, For determining the area or extent of surface disturbance a proposed development project may not be segmented into smaller components, but rather the entire scope and larger common plan ofdevelopment ofa d elo ment iect shall be taken into arcootzt even though multiple separate and distinct land development activities may tale place, at different times on different schedules. Transmission Line& A pipeline that transports oil, gas, or water Mend users as a public utility and which is subject to regulation either by; (a) the Federal Energy regulatory olnrriission's jurisdiction under section 'I (b) of the Natural bias Act, or b) as a "Major utility transmission facility„ under the 'PUblio Service .Law of New York, Article 71 § 120(2)(6), True A motor vehicle designed, uses or maintained primadI y for the transportation of Property, including tankers and/or tractors, together with any tFailers, sernitrailers, combinations thereof, and/or any equipment being transported, hauled, towed or otherwise transported by such motor vehicle, Ann Sumner Fromm Nancy Miller lananda7733ogmali.o * m] Sent: MDnday, June 13, 2011 12:24 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: 011 and Gas [drilling Sark Attachments: Dryden Zoning DRAG HIIU2ropasa]PI,odt As a member of DRAG (Dryden Resource Awareness oatition), l want to thank you and the Town Board for embracing this issue, and proposing ari ordinance. Un fortunately, the simple ban leaves out Iangungt whkh would fully address the full roing� of negative effects and uoxiow; uses which industrial hydro fracking brings to every community where it is practiced. In addition, the narrow focus of the simple ban creates au unnecessary risk of being rejected by New 'Vorlc Courts. 9 To �x these p.roblemg and so we can give our full support, we Are requesting the addition of the attached language to the simple ban. Thank you for your Cor�slderalion, Nancy Miller, ;fit 1 Midline Road, Freeville a Mary Ann Sumner From: JINShay aol.com Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 12:00 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Re: Additions to simple bars on hydWracking I am urging you to add the more inclusive language from the comprehensive bar. to the simple oil and gas drilling bar} that will be considered by the Board st We night's meeting, It is wise and sensible to explicitly speak to the full range of negative imPacts and to the usage of toxins that have been employed ire industrial hydrofracking In order to provide as much strength to our ban as possible in the DIY legal system We know that that these impacts have happened, We know that poisonous chemicals are used in the process. This is truly a case for being better cfF safe than sorry in coverage and In timing. Sincerely, Jan Shay 738 Ringwood Rd, Ithaca, NY 148 iwshay@aol.com i Mary Ann Sumner From: Holly Payne [hollymomma @gmail.comj Sent. Sunday, June 12, 20119:21 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Maker; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: ADD STRONGER LANGUAGE to Fracking Ban - PIsI Dear Town Board, I am a resident of the Town of Dryden and wish to THANK You for considering a simple oil and gas drilling ban at Wednesday's Town Meeting. I understand that if approved, this simple ban will be treated as an amendment to the current zoning law and set for public hearing in mid - July. PLEASEI Unfortunately, the simple ban leaves out language which would fully address the full range of negative effects and noxious uses which industrial hydro fracking brings to every community where it is practiced. In addition, the narrow focus of the simple ban creates an unnecessary risk of being rejected by New York coyrts. To fix these problems and so we can give our full support, WE REQUEST THE ADDITION OF DRAC (Dryden Residents Awareness Coalition) LANGUAGE TO BE ADDED TO STRENGTHEN THE SIMPLE BAN. Sincerely, Holly Payne 398 Ellis Hollow Creek Rd Ithaca (Town of Dryden) I Mary Ann Sumner From: Nancy Lee Koschmann [nancykoschmann @me.com l Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2011 12:21 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: fracking... I do not want the process delayed. We have challenger doesn't know what is going on by little too late. I'll be out of town on the delays. Thank you, Nancy Koschmann already done the discussing. If the now, he should do his own research. 15th, but I do want my voice to be I Republican He's a hear: no more Mary Ann Sumner From: Mary Fainsod Katzenstein [mfk2 @comell.edul Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:27 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Ste lick Subject: Town board regulations Dear Members of the Town Board, We are grateful for your efforts In working hard to put in place regulations and ordinances to protect the infrastructure and the well -being of us residents of the Town. We urge you in the strongest possible terms to work towards completing the process before NYS -DEC considers Issuing any gas - drilling permits. We need strong legal protection for our water wells and aquifers, road use regulations and restrictions on excavation access, zoning restrictions on industrial use sites, and other proactive rules, including a Town ban on gas - drilling as allowed by law. We thank you for your efforts on our behalf. Sincerely, Mary and Peter Katzenstein Mary Fainsod Katzenstein Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor of American Studies Director, American Studies Program White Hall, Department of Government Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 mfk2ftornell.edu 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Elizabeth McMahon [mrsmcpl(R.;gmail.comj Sent. Saturday, June 11, 20114:52 PM To. Mary Ann Sumner Subject: No frack zoning ordinance Please support a no frack zoning ordinance to protect our beautiful countryside. Sincerely, Elizabeth McMahon Mary Ann Sumner From: Narl Mistry jnbm2@cornell.edu] Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 3:29 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject. We support a BAN on drilling In the Town of Dryden Importance: High To: Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town supervisor: supervisor en, ny.us David Maakar, Town'Board member: dmakarndryden,mv.us Joe Solomon, Town Board member: isolomon cr,dryden.ny.us Steve Stelick, Town Board Member: ssteli k t dryden�y.us Jason Leifer, Tow71 Board member: ileifer adryden.ny.us We appreciate very much the efforts of the Dryden Town Board to enact regulations and ordinances to protect the infrastructure and the well -being of us residents of the ToNsm of Dryden. We support a BAN on drill ing in the Town of Dryden for the following reasons: The consequences of allowing deep -well horizontal gas- drilling (Tracking) in our Town will be devastating to our future lives for many decades to come. In spite of rules & regulations attempting to ensure safety and environmental protections, it is amply evident that the drilling companies cannot be trusted and have disregarded and tried to circumvent existing rules wherever they have operated. The NYS DEC does not & will not have the manpower to enforce enhanced SGMI'S regulations, and further the DEC has not adequately considered the cumulative impact of many wells drilled in one location. The contamination of water supplies in RURAL areas like Dryden with mainly private water wells has not been addressed adequately by the DEC. On the contrary, D1 C has made a complete restriction on drilling in the NYCity and Syracuse watersheds while allowing drilling alarmingly close to private wells elsewhere. Road use and environmental zoning restrictions may help, but «nil at best be used after the fact to extract compensation after our neighborhoods have been ruined! We feel that for these reasons we should fight strongly for a complete ban on drilling, including through the courts if necessary. We urge you in the strongest possible terms to work towards enacting an effective ban before NYS -DEC considers issuing any gas - drilling permits. We need strong legal protection for our water wells and aquifers, road use regulations and restrictions on excavation access, zoning restrictions on industrial use sites, and other proactive rules, including a Town ban on gas - drilling as allowed by law. We thank you for your efforts on our behalf Sincerely, Nari.man B. Mistry Virginia A. Mistry 1159 Ellis Hollow Rd., Town of Dryden. 1 Mary Ann. Sumner From: over schmidtojuno.com Sent: Friday, June, 10, X011 6:02 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: Pass Ordinance Agpinst Racking Nmv To Supervisor Sumner and Dryden Town Board Members Makar, Solomon,Selick, and Leifer, I am opposed to the " §IOw.delibePate inclusive process regarding fracking - related ordinances" that has been proposed recently because this has already taken place in a very thorough manner over the last one and a half years! ghat we do need now is a strong, legally defensible zoning ordinance that opposes hydro fracking in our town. I do not want this process weakened or delayeJ, especially not till after the fall election. I appreciate your attention to this urgent matter. Sincerely; Oskar Schmidt 8 Genung Circle Town of Dryden Penny Stock Soaring 3000% Sign up for Free td find out what the next 3000% Stock Winodr isl http: // thirdpartyoffers. iuno. com/ TGL3131 /4df294b34c525343010stO6vuc i Mary Ann Sumner From: tonyaengst @gmall.com on behalf of Tonya Engst [tonya@ idbits.com] sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 1:32 PM To: Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer; David Makar, Mary Ann Sumner Subject. My (brief) thoughts on hydrofracking legislation in Dryden Dear Ptary Ann, Joe, Steve, and Jason, I am in favor of legislation that would slow down, eliminate, or (last choice but possibly more realistic) regulate hydrofracking in Dryden to make it more reasonable for people who don't want to deal with the noise, pollution, extraneous costs, etc. In fact, that's pretty much where I'll be voting in any future Dryden elections, because I care about it more than most (all?) other issues. I've lived on and off (mostly on) in Dryden for my entire life. I have an asthmatic son, and it costs about $1,500 per year to keep him breathing right, so the idea of more air pollution is concerning. I love to bike for transportation and pleasure, and I can often be seen on my bicycle on the back roads surrounding Dryden, so I am also esp. concerned about dealing with truck traffic. I work at home, and I value quietness while I work. Ptost of my savings is tied up in my house, so I am anxious about losing long -term property value if it becomes unpleasant to breathe, work, bike, run, ski and otherwise exist in this area. I have delayed significant, energy - saving home improvement projects because I worry that I'll be wanting to move, and at a loss. That delay, ironically, keeps money out of the local economy and keeps my household using more fossil fuels than it Mould otherwise. Thanks for serving on the Dryden board, -Tonya PS. I do not expect a reply; you must be very busy. PPS. I am shy about sharing my political opinion, and I never wrote letter to elected officials before hydrofracking came up. Tonya Engst, TidUITS /Take Control Ebooks i Ann Sumner From: Sueane Hemmer - Goodreau [sueane.goodreau@ppsfl.org) Sent: Friday, June 10, 20111:25 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Maker, Joseph Solomon; stelick@dryden.ny.us; Jason Leifer Subject: Please pass ordinance Hello -= I am. writing to urge you to please pass the antifracking zoning ordinance. So much work and effort has already been put into motion to this effect and I strongly support the measure. Thank you for your time and consideration of this matter; Sueane.Hemmer Goodreau 633 Ringwood Road Town of Dryden I Mary Ann Sumner From: robert balluffl [rballuffi @twcny.rr.com] Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 1:05 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: fracking ordinance It's time to move ahead on the fracking ordinance. I will not support anyone in town government giving in to delaying tactics. R. W. Balluffi H Mary Ann Sumner From: Joyce Morgenroth pdm9 @eomeII.eduJ Sent: Friday, June 1D, 2011 10:24 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: fracking ordinance Dear Town Board Supervisor, The threats of fracking to our area far outweigh the value it might bring been examined at length, including public forums over the last 18 months. a no fracking ordinance now - -a strong, defensible ordinance as described i Helen and David Slottje. It is crucial, if our elected officials are to be public, that this process should not be delayed until late in the year. Sincerley, ]oyce Morgenroth 474 Snyder Hill Rd. Dryden 1 This subject has t is time to pass the template by responsible to the Mary Ann Sumner From: Kad Russ [khruss @gmail.comj Sent: Friday, June 10,2011 9:16 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: NO fracking Hi Ann, please do not delay the ordinance about fracking past elections in the fall, thanks! Karl Russ 137 Hunt Hill Rd 0 — Mary Ann Sumner From: Jack W. Bradbury Ubmdbury®comell.eduj Sent: Friday, June 10, 20118:35 AM foa Mary Ann Sumner Cc: Jason Leifer; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; David Makar Subject: Moving ahead on ordinance Dear Dryden Town Board, Those of us who have been dealing with the fracking threat to our water, public roads, and life style In Dryden for the last 3 years have heard and said it all. There really is no "new" information to be gleaned by waiting on passing an ordinance that is clearly supported by the majority of Dryden residents. The outside gas companies, some residents who need the money, and possibly the State's tax interests all want to keep local communities from acting. We are proud that Dryden has taken such a strong and early stand on this threat. Once we do, it will encourage other local communities to follow suit. Please do not delay moving ahead on the ordinance. We will be at the next town meeting to support you. Thanks. Jack Bradbury & Sandra Vehrencamp Dr. Jack Bradbury- email: iwb2S@cornell.edu Dr. Sandy Vehrencamp- email: sivB@cornell.edu 81 Besemer Hill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 Phone: 647 -539 -7326 Mary Ann Sumner From: jhbehler@yahoo.com Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 8.24 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: Please pass a NO FRACK zoning ordinance NOW Dear Supervisor and Town Board, Please pass a NO TRACK zoning ordinance NOW. Drilling for natural gas with toxic fracking fluid is environmentally irresponsible and risks contaminating our ground and drinking water. The fact that fracking natural gas drilling with hacking fluid is not regulated has been a disaster for many communities as documented in Gasland {see l pai-wnv), v.voutube com/watch?y =dZ 1 AeI100zl Don't let this happen here in Dryden. Thank you, John Behler, Betty Behler, and Jerri Behler 562 Ellis Hollow Creek Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607)330 -2847 and hiti):/lwww Rasiandtliemovie.camll Mary Ann Sumner From, Terezka Korinek (markova66@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, June 10, 20118:10 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: Please pass NO FRACK zoning ordinance ASAP Dear Dryden Town Board Members, On behalf of my family, I would like to express our strong support for the passing of a NO FRACK zoning ordinance as soon as possible. My family and I do not want the ordinance process weakened or delayed. Dryden and Its residents cannot afford to deal with the ill effects that come with fracking. Thank you very much for all your efforts, Terezka Korinek Steve Anagnostos and children 378 Thomas Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Norman Vrana [nmv3 @corne11.eduj Sent: Friday, June 10, 20118:02 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: NO FRACK It is important that we get a NO FRACK zoning ordinance now without delay of any kind. I and many people attended the public meeting which was well attended. The spirit for "NO FRACKING" was well expressed. Norman Vrana 1296 Ellis Hollow Road J Mary Ann Sumner 1 i rl amrrhervkroonsultinn biz] From: r eca n [ ec Sen t: Fr[day, June 10, 20117:47 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Fraching ban Nis, Sumner, Please endeavor to enact a ban on hydrofrackirig and other tndusiriat activlty as soon possibla, This is going to De a precedent setting step that the residents of Dryden are hIghly supportive of, We rnust take charge of our local land and water and keep tho muMnational oil and gas companies out, Ron Le Cain elkaid Specialist LeCain fe nVironnienial Services, h1c, 607-319-0819 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: p,wrege gmaiLcom on behalf of PeterWrege tp,wrege@ corn ell. edul Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 7,37 AAA To: glary Ann Sumner Subject. Ordinance on g85 drilling )ClW M& Sumner, f spend about half of my Year away tram my home in the. Town ofDryden, mcstoften in Africa those dayrs. Wheo f come back, 1 realiza how important it is to have our quiet, rural, and scenically appealing landscape as a puce to recharge and appreciate, how good life can be. This will not continue if gas drilling, especially hydraulic fracturing methods, come to our Town - The, board has been quite good at holding meetings to dkiouss the issues, and I &n't think that anyone can claim that tho residents of our Town are unaware & the issues and have not had rime to make their feelings known We need to move forward now with changes to the zoning regulations - we can not wait and deIay, Not only is this imp ortant for our quality of life, it is important to our p ockotbcok i, and many others, carp not afford the increased costs that are certain to come to the To n if this industrial scale activity takes hold here, Thank you for your efforts on b6alfofall residents in the Town. Peter Peter H Wrege� 452 Ringwood Road ki Maq Ann Sumner From: Greg Heist [gheist @eaithiink.net] Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:35 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Fracking Ms Sumner, No (racking, no way, Please. The onus has to be on the frackers to prove their safety for OUR WATER and they can'ti Greg heist 1667 Slaterville rd 3 Mary Ann Sumner From: Julia Bonney Ocbonney@twcny.rr.eom] Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:24 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: fracking related ordinance Hi, Mary Ann -- First let me say that it was GREAT to see you in action at the last town board meeting we attended. You and the board did an excellent job with that big crowd; not an easy task. Peter Davies has sent me an e-mail in which he says that .13runo Schickel, who I understxid is challenging you for Town Supervisor in the next election, wants to start all over again with the fracking issue. (Hello. .'where have you been, Bruno? We've been through this already...) Anyway, I am writing to urge you and the board to forge ahead and get a zoning ordinance in place now, before the November election. I know you will defeat Mr. Schickel handily -- and it seems a waste of time to rehash this again, especially when the vast majority of Dryden folks are opposed to hydrofracking. I had an impromptu conversation a couple of weekends ago with awoman from Pennsylvania who had driven up to Eddydale Farms for her bedding plants. We started talking about hydrofracking and she told me about what a disaster it has been down there. She says the trucks run 24 hours a day; they are noisy, polluting, and they have totally broken up the roads (which the tax payers have to pay for repairing, not the natural gas company). She says her house is filthy on the outside because of all the dust and dirt in the air. She also said that people were shocked to discover that they got no residual payments until pumping actually begins, which may not be for some time. And finally she said she hopes that we are smarter than they were in PA, when they gave free reign to the natural gas company to do horizontal drilling. She says it has been a disaster and had a major impact on quality of life down there. She also said that most of the gas workers in the area around her came in from out of town. Please urge your colleagues on the Town Board to move ahead with the ordinance. Many homes in Dryden are on well water and we can ill afford to have our wells polluted. These people who say hydrofracking is safe are simply not telling the truth there is too much'evidence to the contrary. Thanks for reading this, Mary 11nn. (I got a bit longwinded : -) ) Gratefully, Julie and Greg Julia Bonney 0cbon neyOtwcny, rr.com I Mary Ann Sumner From: Peter J. Davies [peter.davies @comeil.edul Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2011 10:03 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: Please pass fracking ban NOW Dear Mary Ann, David, Joe, Steve and Jason, Slickwater horizontal hydrofracking poses a danger to the groundwater on which most or the Dryden residents depend and also promises to contaminate our air, disrupt our way of life and cause serious damage to town infrastructure. We have already gone through a public process during the past year and a half M. and we need a no fra.cking zoning ordinance passed noiv, as per the template prepared by attorneys Helen and David Slottje. We do not want this process weakened or delayed until late in the year. Please pass it NOW. I regret that I will not be at the town meeting on June 15* because I will be out of town at a conference. However please regard it as if I was at the town hall on that date urging you to proceed on this matter. Thank you. Peter feter0ac es 755 %yderYfiQ'9�qad Ithaca, WT 14850 e- rnai(. pidMcomeffedu Tfiion e: 1-607-2724417 WoRfc: 1-607- 379 -1062 (41fien on) 3 Mary Ann Sumner From: Ginny Farmer (msginny.farmer@gmall.coml Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 20116:31 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner, David Maker, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick; Jason Leifer Subject: (racking ban We would like to add our concern about the need for - rewording on the proposed ordinance on the ban of hydrofracking. Please considering adding the wording suggested by the DRAC members regarding the Prohibition of High Jmpact Industrial Use. This issue is too important to our community to ignore all the aspects brought up by those dedicated people who have spent many hours researching it. 'Thank you for your support. David and Ginny Farmer i Mary Ann Sumner From: Linda Clougherty [lindaclougherty@gmail.coml Sent, Tuesday, June 14, 20119:37 PM TO, Jason Leifer, sstelicincorpork @dryden.ny.us; Joseph Solomon; David Makar; Mary Ann Sumner Subject: please add language to Dryden's laws to prevent all types of high Impact Industrial use I am writing to ask you to incorporate the concepts and suggested language proposed by DRAC into Dryden's laws in order to protect our town from ALL types of possible high impact industrial and peripheral uses, The new language will make Dryden's case stronger against potential challenges from gas companies and any other industries that would alter out town in a negative way. Thank you, Linda Clougherty 34 Hunt Hill Road Ithaca, NY i Mary Ann Sumner From: elizabeth (elizabeth @englishare.net] Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 10:14 AM To. Mary Ann Sumner Subject: voicing support for the comprehensive ban Dear Mary Ann, Just to say —I'm a Dryden resident and a strong supporter of a Comprehensive Ban of High Impact Industrial Uses (including hydro- fracking). Thank you for your wonderful service to our communityl Elizabeth Gutchess Mary Ann Sumner From: Art Patrol [zott2 @frontiemet.net] Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:21 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Cc: David Makar Subject: NO FRACK ordinance No frack ordinance now , Pleasel compromise is only acceptable when non toxic technology is developed . and guess what ? if the mining industry is required to spend the money in order to reap the profits it will happen .I have seen it time and time again Remember the no damage five mile per hour bumpers the auto manufacturers said were impossible to produced .shall i continue . Peter Schwartzott 1000 irish settlement rd. 7 Mary Ann Sumner From: Jim Hanson (viindjim20@yahoo.com) Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 5:22 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Dryden Residents Opposed to Fracking Dear Maryann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor, Please represent our thoughts in tonight's meeting relative to passing the anti -fracl ing ordinance, I do not want to see this process weakened or delayed until late this year. We all know what has happened in PA, and do not want to see this process repeated in a place as beautiful as the Town of Dryden. x am sure that you know that your local laws are the only thing that will protect the environment until DEC and EPA develop an appropriate procedure to protect the land and water resources. I will be there tonight to support this position. Thank you. Jim Hanson 1 Ann Sumner From: Martha Robertson [martha.c.robeitson @gmail,com] Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 11:13 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; Mary Ann Sumner; Jason Leifer, Steve Stelick; Davld Makar; Joe Solomon; Mahlon Perkins Cc: Marie McRae; Joe Wilson; Hilary Lambert; Lavines Subject: THANK YOUI!!!! Dear Town Board and Attorney, Thank you So much for your strong voice tonight on behalf of Dryden's future! I so appreciated the things you had to say tonight. Jason, your role in spearheading this effort was fantastic, listening to all sides and working through the issues. Mahlon, your description of the town's authority and the clarity of the proposed language were compelling. Thank you for all the work you put in, with Jason and others, to pull that together. It was a historic step. All the best, Martha 1 Mary Ann Sumner From. Sent: Cc: Subject: Dear Mary Ann, Joseph Wilson lwilson.joe7g @gmall.com] Thursday, June 16, 2011 11:53 AM Mary Ann Sumner DRAC; Irene Stein; James Gustafson; Martha Robertson; Jim Skaley; Simon SLLaurent; Martin Fellows Hatch; Joe Lalley; David Alan Weinstein Thanks, Mary Ann Thank you for your statement regarding the ban last night. I thought that you very clearly articulated the complexity of the thought process in which you have been engaged and how you came to the conclusion that right now a ban is in the best interests of the Town of Dryden. I and the others who have pursued a ban for many months are grateful for the leadership you have shown in bringing this matter to a conclusion in a timely way. As you know, we will also continue to pursue improvements until we have the most protection and most defensible zoning possible. I and I believe many others of us look forward to working with and supporting this and your efforts on behalf of the Town. Regards, Joe Wilson 75 Hunt Hill Road Ithaca, NY 14850 -9674 607 - 539-1159 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Deborah Cipolla- Dennis [dgd25 @oornell.eduj Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2011 1:02 PM To: Joseph Solomon; Jason Leifer, Steve Stelick; Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar Cc: drydenrac@googlegroups.com Subject: Thank You Dryden Town Board Members, Thank you so much for your leadership in moving forward with setting the public hearing for the amendment to the current zoning law to clarify that natural gas exploration and related activities are not permitted within our town. The statements made last night by Mary Ann, David, Steve and Jason were heart -felt and strong. It was extremely valuable to hear your views on this issue. As you know, I along with many members of the DRAC team, have been advocating for this type of protection for almost two years. It has been enlightening to attend town board meetings and build an understanding of the hard work that you do for our community. This is a special place and I can tell that you are all very sincere In your motives and actions with regards to preserving our unique and wonderful way of life. Thank you again and I am excited to continue working with you on completing this action and looking forward towards how we ensure that we are also protected in the new zoning taw that is quickly approaching. Sincerely, Deborah Cipolla- Dennis 964 West Dryden Road Freeville, NY 13068 Mary Ann Sumner From: Quede, Nathalie [NQuede@PKaufmann.com] Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 11:21 AM Ta; Mary Ann Sumner Dear Mary Ann Sumner, I own a small house on a 8 acres property on Ed Hill Road. I will not be able to attend the meeting on July 20th regarding gas drilling but I am just giving my vote. Save our land, save our precious water. Ban hydraulic fracturing in Dryden. With all my respect for your dedicated work to the town of Dryden, Regards, Nathalie Quede May Ann Sumner _ From: Paula Peter (Paula @thesolsticegroup,00m] Sent: Sunday, July 10, 20119:01 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: no fracking please Hey MaryAnn- Please know that I'm among the town residents who urge you to hold firm on keeping us free from Frackingi Should my neighborhood get a well — my retirement, water, and home investment will be In Immediate jeopardy. Should our region become an industrial wasteland, there would be little reason to remain in a state that exacts the highest taxes In the union. I will be forced to move my small business elsewhere, Thanks for all that you and others have done to keep this disaster at bay. - paula peter Mary Ann Sumner From, Todd Bittner [prairieguy @earthlink.net] Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2011 8:23 PM 0 To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer, Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Zoning Amendment Public Comment Dear Town of Dryden Supervisor Sumner and Board Members Makw-, Leifer, Stelick, and Solomon, I am writing to provide a public comment with regard to the Town of Dryden Zoning Code Amendment to prohibit industrial activities, including hydrofracking, in the Town of Dryden. As a father of two children and an avid, life -song conservationist of our natural resources, I am very concerned about the negative consequences from hydrofracking and associated development to our environment, roads, and property values if this type of industrialization and pollution are allowed in our Town. There is no doubt that this type of industrial land use will significantly impact and damage our cherished landscapes, irreparably changing the character of our beautiful town forever. The risks from hydrofracking pollution to our drinking water sources and air is too great. I am also concerned about it's impact to organic farming businesses, local tourism, and public safety on our roadways from increased traffic. I applaud you for your eiTorts to see this activity is not allowed - at least until proven safe and the industry is able to mitigate ALL negative impacts - and urge you to amend the Town's zoning code to ban industrial development, including hydrofracking. Thank you for your continued service to our community. Sincerely, Todd Bittner 533 Ringwood Road, Freeville, NY 13065 I Mary Ann Sumner From: jennifer@lunaseabooks.com Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 12.35 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Cc: Christopher J. Kelly Subject: Dryden fracking ban.public hearing Dear Town of Dryden Board Members, Thank you for your willingness to hear public comments on the issue of hydrofracking in the Town of Dryden. I look forward to attending the meeting on )uly 20. I am writing to explain my concerns about this process in advance of the meeting. My family and I believe this is the biggest issue facing New York and the Finger Lakes, where we chose to relocate over ten years ago to work, live, and raise our son. The news that hyrofracking could contaminate this beautiful area, as well as our health, has devasted us. According to Environmental Advocates of New York, "Fracking endangers our drinking water and will turn parts of New York State into industrial drilling zones. "Each time a new well is drilled, 2 to S million gallons of water laced with toxic chemicals are required. With thousands of wells proposed, that means billions of gallons of water will be used every yearl Withdrawing this volume of water from local waterways and aquifers could devastate sensitive habitats and drinking water. Recent events in ® Pennsylvania show how dangerous fracking can be when it's not properly regulated." And as a local activist and independent journalist so eloquently puts it: "Fracking is the single most important issue facing New Yorkers. It will add water - pollution, air- pollution and food toxicity illnesses, generate injuries to workers and others, and thereby increase our health care costs. It contributes to greenhouse gases and global climate change and the increasingly commonplace wacky weather patterns we are seeing in New York and elsewhere. It will kill our tourism, outdoor adventuring, and agriculture and vineyards enterprises around the state —which would constitute economic suicide. Those industries combined bring in about $2.2 billion annually and provide 515,000 jobs (and will likely grow as neighboring Pennsylvania's hunting, fishing, agriculture, and tourism sicken and die of fracking- related causes). We must not allow the progress we have made these last few decades on the clean air /clean water /safe food to be wiped out via one destructive industry, nor allow our bucolic state to be turned into an industrial wasteland. New York is "Fracking Ground Zero." People in fracked states are looking to us for leadership, begging New Yorkers to stop the madness before it takes hold here. They do not want us to be poisoned, and they also want us to help them stop the industrialization and maybe help reverse some of the damage to their communities. (Alas, it is too late for many of these states, and huge swathes of land as well as people's health and properties are beyond reclamation.)" Here are a few links to useful information about the dangers of hydrofracking: Pennsylvania orders a halt: http: / /www.Dressconnects,com/ article /20098925/NEWS01/90925025/Pa - orders -a- halt -to- Cabot -eas- drilline- in- Dimock &referrer= FRONTPAGECAROUSEL E NY Times Drilling Down Series. Articles in the series examine the risks of natural -gas drillindo and efforts to redulate'iti ' 4 1 ' . . . " http• / /wwwo nytimes com /interactivelus /DRILLINIG DDWN SERIES.html We believe that our leaders, in all levels of government, have as their first priority the people's health and well- being. There is no mpney that can improve a community of unhealthy people. Our neighbors in Pennsylvania have seen their drinking water contaminated, their lands made impossible to -farm, and their property values decline. Please consider the impact it could have on the Town of Dryden. Respectfully yours, Jennifer Savran Kelly 7 Redwood Lane and Christopher Kelly 2 Mary Ann Sumner From: wbamett @twcny.rr.com Sent. Tuesday, July 19, 2011 12:32 PM To. Mary Ann Sumner, David Makar; Joseph Solomon; Jason Leifer Subject: Gas - drilling ban in Dryden To whom it may concern. Please note that myself, William E. Barnett, and my wife, Andrea I.B. Barnett, residents of 40 Genung Circle in the Town of Dryden since 1995, are vigorously opposed to unregulated hydrofacturing for natural gas in our town. We are appalled that, without our knowledge, gas companies are permitted to swoop in and tie up land through leases that would permit our neighborhood's beautiful rural character to be transformed into a virtual industrial zone. We share the environmental concerns of many about the possible consequences of toxic chemicals, methane gas migration, etc., but what is most upsetting is that our neighborhood could be subjected to noise, light, and air pollution from drilling equipment and huge trucks that will certainly damage our narrow, nearly shoulderless roads. We understand a person's right to dispose of her land as she sees fit, but like all rights this right is constrained by the effects of exercising it on others. After all, one can be arrested for merely playing music loudly or otherwise causing a nuisance on one's own property, and what happens when hydrofracturing occurs is massively more annoying than that. And no one can simply build whatever she wants to on her property without observing local zoning laws and other state and even federal regulations. And yet the allure of big money has some folks believing they are entitled to change the lives of their neighbors radically forever. We urge everyone in Dryden Town government to resist industry pressure and preserve the beauty and character of our town (not to mention avoiding potentially devastating effects on local aquifers and private wells). Thanks for reading our opinion. Sincerely, Bill and Andrea Barnett 40 Genung Circle 277 =3641 wbarnettAtwcnv.rr.com aib170cornell.edu I Ann Sumner From: Ellen Phillips [ephillip@icsd.k12.ny.us] Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 11:59 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: NO FRACK Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town Supervisor: Please consider our beautiful resources cannot be unpolluted once an accident occurs. "Oh Well ", will not bring back our beautifully, clean and mighty fine tasting well water! I beg and pray PLEASE Do Not Let Fracking come to Dryden. Your fellow citizen of Dryden, Ellen Phillips 4 Woodland Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850 607 - 539 -7273 11 Mary Ann Sumner From: acengst@gm ail. Gom an behalf of Adam Engst [ace( tidblts.cvm] Sent: Tuesday, July 1g, 2011 10026 AM To; Mary Ann Sumner: David Makar; Jason Leifer; %3phen felick: Joseph Solomon Cc: Tanya Engst Subject Strongly in favor of banning drilling In Dryden ralkcs, We certainly plan to he at the meeting on Wednesday night to express support for the proposed drilling ban in person, but I wanted to weigh in in advance, under the assumption that there will be only a limited amount of time for anyone to speak at the meeting. As Dryden residents, my wife and son and 1 are strongly in favor of banning drilling in Dryden in pretty much any way that can be accomplished. Y don't know if zoning is the most effective, but given both the media reports from places where there's intensive drilling in Pennsylvania and reports from friends who were shocked at the effects while just passing through, it seems extremely likely that drilling would significantly harm the quality of life in Dryden. We live here because it's a quiet, rather rural area, and it's a good plate to raise children. Turning the township into a place with huge amounts of truck traffic (which is inevitable should drilling happen) would be awful; our family spends a lot of time running and biking on the roads around Dryden, and even something as minor as the temporary Ellis Hollow lane closure has noticeable impact. And, of course, there is the potential for significant environmental pollution; although there's no may to know if it would #upper}, it's clear that it can happen, and the fact that the industry won't even reveal what chemicals they're using creates what we feel, is an unacceptable situation. For us, the agricultural nature of Dryden is merely a bonus, rather than our livelihood, but it seems like it too would he in danger if pollution were to overwhelm the local wells. But I'm sure I'm not telling you anything you haven't heard a thousand times already. Just knca� that we do care, deeply, and we would hate to see Dryden ruined by the short -tern interests of giant corporations with no stake in the local landscape. cheers... Adam & Tanya Engst i Mafy Ann Sumner From: Mary Ja Wood (ma ryjocwaod 0mail,com] Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 12:57 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: hydrofracking Dear Mary Ann, to addition to the obvious cvncefns over water quality, my husband and T are concerned about raise pollution. We choose to live outside the city of Ithaca, and tolerate the imconvenienres associated with rural life (longer commutes to work, more wear and tear on our vehicles, well and septic issues) in order to enjoy an amazing [evel of pe a and. quiet, Are there racist: ordinances on the books that will address the increased levels of noise that will assault us twenty -four hogs a da 71:s the solitude we value so much available, to the highest bidder? Please take this negative eEect of hydrofracking and the industry surrounding it into consideration. Sincerely, Mary To and Jeff, Wood 33 Genung Circle Ithaca "Life is'this simple, We are living in a world that is abso[utely transparent and the divM is sh'Ining through it all the time_ This is not just a nice story or a Fable. It is true. Thomas Merton i Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To. Subject: Dear Ms. Sumner, Jay Harvey [h]h4 rarnell,edLt] Minday. July 18, 2011 2:OU PM Mary Ann Sumner Fracking Ban 1 and my family reslde at 479 Midline Road in Freeville. a own 33 acres of beautiful land In the Six Mile Creek watershed where we have lived for the past 18 +years. I am wrlting to let you know that we are adamartky opposed to hydrofracking and strongly sup part the proposed ban on the process in the Town of Dryden. Thank yoga, Jay Harvey 1 Mary Aran Sumner From: John Allison Kiefer Uakl4 cDrnell.edu] Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 6:35 PM Tom Mary Ann Sumner Subject: Hydraulic Fracturing Dear Wls. Sumner, As 3Nyear residents of the Town of Dryden, we appreciate your efforts to preserve our quality of living and the unique character of our community by banning fracking from the Town. Sincerely, John and Patil ♦defer 250 In'sh Settlement Road Fre +ille, NY 13088 844 9343 I ® Mary Ann Sumner From: kathednesholtys@aim.com Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 10:13 AM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar; Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: proposed ban on drilling As a town of Dryden resident, 1 am in favor of a proposal to ban the drilling for natural gas. Kathy Sholtys 9 Sparrow Crest Ithaca 11 Mary Ann Sumner From: rd, David Mermin [ndm4 cornell -eduj Sent: Tuesday, July i9, 2011 10:14 PM To, Mary Ann Sumner; stelick dryden.ny,us; David Makar; Joseph Salomon; Jason Leber Subject: July 20th town beard meeting and thereafter To: Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town supervisor: su eryisor r den.n .us David Maka r, Town Board member: dmaRar[@drydenFnV.us Joe Solomon, Town Board member: jsolomon(hdryden.ny.us Steve 5telick, Town Board MieMer: gstelickPdryden,n y.us Jason Leifer, Town Board member: i leifer0dryden. ny. us We are residents of the Town of Dryden and urge you to enact zoning ordinances or any other regulations that will prohibit fracking in the town of Dryden, Our only source of water is our private wall. We are very concerned that horizontal drilling at the nearby sites allowed by the DEC may contaminate our private eater supply, and are incensed at the action of DEC to ban such drilling in the NYC and Syracuse watersheds, while disregarding those of us who depend on our cngn "watersheds ". lie are also distressed at the prospect of transforming our beautiful rural surroundings into a major industrial zone, with heavy, road- damaging water -truck traffic and large crews & workers from outside our area, in this time of increasingly constrained state budgets, the state DEC is inadequately staffed and funded to police such drilling, even if they promulgated perfect regulations, which 'they presently seem unlikely to do, rinaily, although we believe the damage to our community is not worth even the high estimates of the economic benefits of extracting gas from the Marcellus Shale, toe note the recent series in the NY -limes, suggesting that the revenues to be produced by such drilling may have been grossly overestimated. We realize that any action of the Town Board to prohibit fracking in the Town of Dryden may well be challenged and eventually overruled at a higher level, but the fight is still worth undertaking. If enough communities act together on this issue, it could well open some eyes to the damaging consequences of fracking, and change some minds in Alhanyp So please do continue io your efforts to protect the citizens of our Tourn From this impending Calamity. Thank you very much. De,vW and Dorothy Mermin 75 hickory Road 1485@=9666 a Matt' Ann Sumner From: Mary Fainsod Katzenstein [mtk2 @cornell.edu] Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 9:38 PM To. Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Joseph Solomon; Stephen Stelick Jason Leifer Cc: Peter Joachim Katzenstein Subject: We support a BAN on drilling in the Town of Dryden To: Mary Ann Sumner, Dryden Town supervisor: supervisor r ryden ny us David Makar, Town Board member: dmakar a,dryden,n .us Joe Solomon, Town Board member: Isola n u d,_!y en.nyms Steve Stelick, Town Board Member: sstelick @dryd n.ny.us Jason Leifer, Town Board member: ileifer@drvden.ny.us My husband, Peter Katzenstein, and T are out of town and can't attend tomorrow's Board meeting but .1- hope you will accept our gratitude for taking the issue of natural gas drilling seriously; Our neighbors, Ginny and Nari Mistry have said well what we would like to say ourselves, e.g that "we support a BAN on drilling in the Town of Dryden for the following reasons: The consequences of allowing deep -well horizontal gas - drilling ('Tracking) in our Town will be devastating to our future lives for many decades to come. Tn spite of rules & regulations attempting to ensure safety and environmental protections, it is amply evident that the drilling companies cannot be trusted and have disregarded and tried to circumvent existing rules wherever they have operated. The NYS DEC does not & will not have the manpower to enforce enhanced SGEIS regulations, and further the DEC has not adequately considered the cumulative impact of many wells drilled in one location. The contamination of water supplies in RURAL areas like Dryden with mainly private watcr wells has not been addressed adequately by the DEC. On the contrary, DEC has made a complete restriction on drilling in the NYCity and Syracuse watersheds while allowing drilling alarmingly close to private wells else1where. • Road use and environmental zoning restrictions may help, but will at best be used after the fact to extract compensation after our neighborhoods have been ruinedi We feel that for these reasons we should fight strongly for a complete ban on drilling, including through the courts if necessary. We urge you in the strongest possible terms to work towards enacting an effective ban before NYS -DEC considers issuing any gas - drilling permits. We need strong legal protection for our water wells and aquifers, road use regulations and restrictions on excavation access, zoning restrictions on industrial use sites, and other proactive rules, including a Town ban on gas - drilling as allowed bylaw." We hope very much that these views can be given full consideration. With thanks, Mary and Peter Katzenstein Mary . Fainsod Katzenstein is Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor of American Studies Department of Government 1 Mary Ann Sumner From: Louise Raimondo lsunsetsoncayuga @yahoo.com) Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 3 :12 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Cc: dmaker@dryden.ny.us; Jason Leifer; ssteick@dryden.ny.us; Joseph Solomon Subject: Hydrofracking Ban in Dryden Dear Ms. Sumner, My husband & l; have lived in the Town of Dryden for the past 19 years and voted for you in the last election. We support regulations to ban hydrofracking within the town of Dryden, as this techn.ologry is unsafe and has the potential to have severe 'adverse effects on our Town's environment. This would 'include potentially twining our bountiful natural resources where the wells are located, our roads & bridges, a nd polluting anal /or blowing up our drinking water wells. To benefit whom? The energy companies and a few landowners who were willing to sacrifice their living envi.i*Gon vent for short term profit? This is your chance to act to save our Town from the plague that is wvreaking havoc upon our neighboring state of Pennsylvania. Please do all that is in. your power to prevent this fronn happening here. Sincerely, Louise Raimondo James Gaffney 1 ® Mary Ann Sumner From: Peter Gregory [pg46@comell.edu] Sent. Wednesday, July 20, 2011 3:43 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner; David Makar, Jason Leifer; Stephen Stelick; Joseph Solomon Subject: Proposed Drilling Ban Importance: High Dear folks, We are deeply distressed by the prospect of fracking in the Town of Dryden and In the Finger Lakes in general. Please join our neighboring towns and ban this process from Dryden. Fracking, because of the environmental pollution that can come with it (noise, contamination of our drinking water, etc.), truck congested roads, plus the drilling rig- related eye sores that would ruin our region's treasured scenery could have a serious adverse effect on this region. The effects would reach far beyond the purely aesthetic and destroy our valuable tourist industry forever. At Finger Lakes. Corn their opening statement is "The Finger lakes are an ideal destination, drawing countless visitors to the natural, scenic beauty of the region." Add fracking to the equation and this statement could be re- written as follows: "Want to see the destruction of the most scenic, environmental treasures of the USA? Come to the Finger Lakesl" Perhaps the most tragic aspect of this is the strong possibility — recognized b some companies in the fracking P P Y Y p business — that they might not find the gas even having mutilated our landscape in their rush to extract it. This was illustrated In a recent NY Times article at http: / /www.nytimes .com /2011 /06 /26 /us /26gas.html? r= 1 &emc =etal which stated that "Natural gas companies have been placing enormous bets on the wells they are drilling, saying they will deliver big profits and provide a vast new source of energy forthe United States. But the gas may not be as easy and cheap to extract from shale formations deep underground as the companies are saying, according to hundreds of industry a -mails and internal documents and an analysis of data from thousands of wells. In the e- mails, energy executives, industry lawyers, state geologists and market analysts voice skepticism about lofty forecasts and question whether companies are intentionally, and even illegally, overstating the productivity of their wells and the size of their reserves." This is not the only evidence of dishonesty in the industry. On the front page of July 16 -17, 2011 edition of The Ithaca Journal an article entitled 'Landowners look for an escape after signing drilling contracts' highlighted the lies that are told to potential lessors, in one case, the company stated that the target lessor had no choice but to lease, citing the "forced integration" that could be Imposed on her by the company. Such a circumstance, she was told, would give her zero control over her land. As it turned out, this was false. Again, we strongly urge you to ban fracking from the Town of Dryden. Thank you for considering these comments I I Sincerely, Peter and Nerys Gregory, 14 Hunter Lane, Ithaca (Town of Dryden), NY 14850 2 t t CA r' , Independent Oil & Gas Association of 20 June 2011 New York Ms. Mary Arm Sumner Supervisor, Town of Dryden 93 E. Main St. Dryden, NY 13053 Dear Ms. Sumner: CrE i1 %,7FE� 1 JUN 2/201 I understand that the Town of Dryden is considering a ban on hydraulic fracturing. Please accept this letter into your dialogue before you vote, and let me assuage your fears by providing you with the facts you need to make a good decision. The oil and gas industry has been safely operating in Tompkins County for more than 70 years. There are several wells drilled there, the vast majority of which have been completed using hydraulic fracturing, and are still actively producing natural gas. Consider this: based on current pricing and average production results in Pennsylvania, just one Marcellus Shale well drilled in the Town of Geneva, would have assessed property taxes exceeding $250,000 per year. If this same well was drilled on Town property and the Town received both the royalties and the taxes, the total payments to the municipality would exceed $900,000 annually.* An outright ban would jeopardize revenue for schools, libraries and essential services for the town from an industry which uses little or no government services. Instead of listening to anecdotes and stories that aren't relevant or true, consider this: Hydraulic fracturing is a proven, trusted and highly scientific technology used to extract water, oil or natural gas from deep below the Earth's surface. It has been performed 1.1 million times nationwide over the past 60 years and not a single case has ever led to groundwater contamination. This is important enough to repeat: hydraulic fracturing does not lead to groundwater contamination. At a recent U.S. House Oversight Committee hearing, President Barack Obama's EPA administrator, Lisa fackson, admitted the environmental risk of hydraulic tiacturing is practically nonexistent. "I'm not aware of any proven case where the tracking process itself has affected water, although there are investigations ongoing," she said. The economic benefits — to both otir state coffers and to individual landowners — is also compelling: • In 2005, approximately $53 million was paid to primarily rural landowners in the form of ® royalties on oil and gas production; 38 Lake Street • Hamburg, New York 14075 • Phone (716) 202 -4688 • Fax (716) 202 -4689 Page Two • Local taxes, collected wmually on the stage's oil and gas production, are estimated to be $13 million, a nearly 104old increase over annual tax receipts a decade ago; and • Since 1996, local governments have collected more than $44 million in tax revenues from natural gas and oil production, mainly in Western New York and the Southern Tier. When emotions, not reason, govern decision - making, misunderstwidings occur. When the State Legislature last year was caught up in the issue of the safety of hydraulic fracturing, it passed legislation which, as written, would have barred existing safe drilling, jeopardized 5,000 existing industry jobs, and negatively impacted more than 300 employers across the state. Luckily former Governor Paterson vetoed the legislation. Natural gas is the raw material of economic growth, and it presents one of the most important economic opportunities that New York has seen in a generation or more — one that will bring benefits to businesses of all kinds, as well as to our region. This is an economic opportunity balanced by stringent environmental protection. Please consider this before voting to ban hydraulic fracturing in the town of Dryden and encourage neighboring townships to make informed decisions based on science and fact, and not hearsay. Very truly yours, Bradley R. Gill Executive Director Independent Oil & Gas Association of New York *Estimated, using calculations from the Town of Worcester in Otsego County. 0 — Mary Ann Sumner From: Sent: To: Subject: To: Town Supervisor Craig anderson [craiga @frontiemet,netj Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:18 AM Mary Ann Sumner Town of Dryden Contact: Comment From craig anderson craieapfrontiernet.net Message: No to a complete ban on gas drilling. A total ban will completely take array land owners property rights, it will also place hundreds of leased properties into a lease prugatory when forced majeure is applied. Will a ban help ether of these land owners? No. Use the DEC regulations as a template for regulating gas drilling in Dryden. Thanks, Craig Sent from (ip address): 74. (74 -47- 182- 8.dsl2.nrwc.ny.1 Date /Time: July 20, 2011 3: Coming from (referer): httf (Windows NT 6.1; 1401464; rv: Gecko/20100101 Firefox /5.0 47.182.8 rontiernet.net) 17 pm : / /dryden.ny.us /contact -us 5.0) 3 Using (user agent): Mozilla /5.0 Mary Ann Sumner From: Craig Schutt [craigschutt @tcswcd.org) Sent: Friday, June 17, 20114:04 PM To: Mary Ann Sumner Subject: gas drilling Marianne, I was unfortunately unable to attend the meeting last night but I have reviewed some of information sent out about It I guess it's no surprise to you but I have very strong reservations about the proposed zoning changes to ban all gas drilling in the Town. To me it is short sighted and a reaction to a vocal group of residents, Where in the world are landowners rights being considered? I fear they are not and the Town is taking complete control over people's property rights. People who have paid taxes on this land for generations are now being told they can't benefit from it because a group of people who mainly don't own much land (and I bet most of them use natural gas as well) don't want drilling. Of course there are concerns and we should all look at this from every angle possible and take all precautions, but to simply say we are taking this right away from you and we don't care what you think. Well I have a serious problem with that, not to mention 1 still question the legality of the move. As I have said I do not want my tax dollars going to fund the defense of a law that I have grave reservations about its legality. I am no lawyer so I could easily be wrong. i guess I would ask you and the Board to please consider this long and hard before you impose it on all of us. Has anyone asked the landowners (I mean large landowners farmers) their thoughts and taken those into consideration. As we move forward with the Ag Planning project and visit farms we are asking those questions to gauge farmers thoughts on the subject. i would ask that you and the Board at least give the Ag Protection Plan Committee time to complete these surveys and report back to you on the results. We are just beginning so I have no idea what we will find out but it just seems fair and logical, to hear from the people gas drilling has the potential to effectthe most. I can assure I will give you the complete and unbiased results, whatever the results. Maybe we will find the same feelings as we are seeing from the residential population. Another question, how would you and the Board feel if high volume fracking was no longer an issue, because what I am hearing that may very well be the future of the Marcellus and other shale layers? Would the feelings change or would the same group of naysayers still be as vocal. I guess if that were a reality we would then know if this is actually concerns as laid out or merely a NIMBY reaction. I am guessing probably some of both. Anyway let's keep our ears open and see what comes down the road, it is my understanding technology is changing fast and to do a wholesale no drilling, ever approach is short sighted and over reactive. And I'll say it again what do people want us to use for energy in this community? I don't hear that subject approached much and personally I would like to hear that discussion. You have heard this from me before also, I believe there is a degree of hypocrisy for those who benefit from natural gas (in reality we all do), but I mean through lower energy costs, and are fine with it being in someone else's back yard. I would like very much to have the opportunity to utilize natural gas and lower my utility bills, but I choose to live where that is not possible right now, and probably never will be. Yet I don't have a problem if one of the landowners around me has the opportunity to drill and benefit. It's their right as landowners, just as is for a landowner choosing not to allow it. Seems like trying o work on a plan for some local use of the resource so all of us might benefit would be a better strategy. I know some places in PA were talking about that, don't know how that has worked out, but seems reasonable if it could be made to work. Anyway enough rambling, I'm quite certain with the current mindset and makeup of the Board they are determined to do this so I may have wasted my time, but at least I got It off my chest. Thanks for your indulgence. Please consider my suggestion about the ag surveys. Craig DRY`� w NOD i3A 1*�,\ 6 I HP AP,a TM MAW/ S fkLL c �-� JUuy Jq I 201 I >D C Nt(PE Q -�M VVQ SDAR�D 1N7 DD is Pet SK 6�7 FCU t_GFD ot::� S P t L>.S © VEAD L-s( CAS M 1 CA 1+ ES1 PZQCl M�V (51= g1 N i�?AcNm rr r r i AMD jADW 00 \' �c�11 �`E sum UtzrZ tJE C4Ao �� pry\�� v4-1�((z fist CATS Z I L�L_ AKvD S YPALu� TB 8-2-11 Supv Sumner said she had been asked to perform a marriage ceremony for friends and asked the board to appoint her as a marriage officer for that occasion. RESOLUTION #127 (2011) - APPOINT MARRIAGE OFFICER C1 Makar offered the following resolution and asked for its adoption: WHEREAS, New York Domestic Relations Law 11 -c authorizes the town board to appoint a marriage officer who shall have the authority to solemnize a marriage performed in accordance with other provisions of law, and WHEREAS, Joseph E. Laquatra, Jr. and Gregory Potter have requested that Mary Ann Sumner preside over their marriage ceremony, and WHEREAS, Mary Ann Sumner is the town supervisor and by reason of such office is familiar with the requirements of the Domestic Relations Law as they pertain to the solemnization of marriages and is willing to preside over the marriage of Messrs. Laquatra and Potter, now, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS: 1. Mary Ann Sumner is hereby appointed a marriage officer of the Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York, for the single occasion of the marriage of Joseph E. Laquatra, Jr. and Gregory Potter. 2. The authority to solemnize a marriage shall apply only within the Town of Dryden. 3. The marriage officer shall receive no salary or wage for her services but may accept and keep up to seventy-five dollars ($75.00) for such marriage, paid by or on behalf of the persons married. 4. This resolution shall take effect immediately. 2nd Cl Solomon Roll Call Vote Cl Stelick Yes Cl Solomon Yes Supv Sumner Yes Cl Makar Yes Cl Leifer Yes Supv Sumner recognized the death of Oers Kelemen who had served on the Town's Zoning Board of Appeals for several years. The next meeting of the board will be August 10 at 7:30 p.m. There being no further business, on motion made, seconded and unanimously carried, the meeting was adjourned at 8:00 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Bambi L. Avery Town Clerk Page 16 of 16 G? 7, 20 Appendix A State Environmental Quality Review FULL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FORM Purpose: The full EAF is designed to help applicants and age ncles determine, in an orderly manner, whether a project or action may be signiFcinnt, The question of whether an action may he signifi .ant is not always easy to answer_ rrequently, there are aspcm5 of a project that are subjective or unmcesurable, It is also understood that those who determinc significance may have little or no formal knowledge of the environment or may not be t,pchnically expert in envlronmental analysis. In addition, many who have knowledge in one particular area may not be aware of the broader r.oncurns affecting the question of significance. The full EAF is intended to provide a inethod whereby applicants and zigencie5 can be assured that the determination process has been orderly, comprehensive in nature, yet flexible enough to allow Introduction of information to fit a project or action, Full FAF Components: 'rho full EAF is comprised of thfee parts: Part 1: Providc5 objective data and information about a gfvon project end its site, By identifying basic project data, it {assists a reviewer in the analysis that taJce5 place in Parts 2 and 3_ Part 2: Focuses on EdentiFying the range of passible impacts that may occur From a project or action. It provides guidance as to whether an Impact is likely to he considered small to moderate or whether It Is a potenLiallylarge impact_ The form also identifies + tether an impact. can bi mitigated or reduced. Part 3: It' any impact in Part 2 is identified as potentially- large, then Part 3 is used to evaluate whether or not the impact Is actually important, THIS AREA LEAD ` ARENC USE ONLY DETERMINATION OF SIGNIFICANCE -- Type 1 and Unlisted Actions Identify the Portions of EAF completed for this projectl El Part 1 ® Part 2 Part 3 Upon revlew of the information recorded on this EAF (Parts 1 and 2 and 3 if appropriate), and any other supporting information, and considering both the magnitude and importance: of cash impact, it is reasonably determined by the Icad agency that: F8 The project will not result. in any Iafge and important Impacts) and, therefore, is one which will not have a significant impact on the environrneat, therefore a negative declaration will be prepared. I B. B. Although the project could have a significant effect on the environmemt, there wvill not he a sigiiificaot effect for this Unlisted Action because the iniugaticn rneasures described in PART 3 have been required, therefore a CONDITIONED negative declaration will he prepared,* C. The project may result in one or more large and important impacts that may have a significant impact on the Lmnvironlnent, therefore a positive declaration will be prepared. °A Conditioned Negative Declaration Ei only valid for llnliisLed Actions Zonirig amendment., l)rohibition agalns[ i iriluraI gas explorarCivai and dri lling e'ic. Wine of Action Town of Drydon Name of lead Agency Mary .inn Suniner Print ur Tvvo Name we bsi to er in Leal Agency Toyvii Supervisor riune -l-7, 201 I Lea Le Page 1 of 21 PART 1-- PROJECT INFORMATIOM Prepared by Project Sponsor #NOTICE: This document is designee! to assist in determining whether the actlon proposed may have a significant effect on the environment, PleEise complete the entire form, Parts A through C. AnSwerS to these questions will be eonsidored as part of tho application far approval and may be subject to further verification and public review_ Provide any additional information you believe will bo needed to comprote Por1S 2 and 3. It is expected that Completion of the full EAF will be dependent on information currently available end will not involve new sludies, research orinvestigaiion, IFinformakion requiring such additional %vofk is unavallable, so Indicate and specify each Instance, fame or Action Zoning Amendment, prohibition against natural ga.9 e,xploradon and drilling etc, Location of Action (include Street Address, MunicipaIily and Counly) '1loWl, cif DrytEcn, a] I -Zoning districts, brit excluding the villages of Pineeville and 17rydai) Name o f App I ica r)VS ponso r Towri of Dryden Address 93 FasC Alain Street. CityIPO Dryden Stale NY Business Telephone 607 $44 M8 8 Name of Owner (if different) sand Address City ! PQ Business Telephone Description of Action_ Slate Zip Code 13053 Zip Cade The'19own of Dryden hms propnsed nrnendin� the town's 7_oning Ord inarkw to clearly state the prohibition against gtis drilling. It has never been an allo+veel use, Sind this sinendmet ir. simply rcaffinus that, aa7d cler7rly suites that it is prohibited with spLwific defined aeti k i 6Im I Page 2 of 21 F Please Complete Each Question -- Indicate N.A. if not applicable A. SITE DESCRIPTION Physical setting of overall project, boUi developed and undeveloped areas. 1, Present Land Use, Urban Forest 2- Total acre {9qc of project area APPROXIMATE ACRFAGE Not Applicable ® Industrial Commercial ❑ Rcsidential (suburban) Rural (non -farm) ©Agriculture ©Other Meadow or Brushland (Non- agricukuriaI) Forested acre5, Agricultural pndudcs orchards, cropland, pasture, etc,) Wetland (Freshwater or tidal as per Articles 24,25 of ECL) Water Surface Area Urivegetated (ftck, earth or till) Roads, buildings and other paved surfaces Other (Indicate type) PRESENTLY acres acres acres {9Cre5 acres acres acres _ Wre5 3. What is predorninarit Soil type(c) on project site? C91 Soil drainageo ©Well drairied5 of site ® Moderately well drained uPaorly drgincd .% of site AFTER COMPLETION % of site. aCfes acres acres acres acres ZiCrn5 acres acres b- I any agrictiltural land is involved, how ninny acres or soil are classified within soil group 7 Lhrnugh 4 of the HYS Land ClassiFicatian System ? acres (see 1 NYCRR 370). 4, Are Lhere bedrork outcroppings on project. Site? E] Yes El No a. What is depth to bedrock (in feet) 5- Approximate percentage of proposed project site with slopes: R0 -10 °l0 DION 15% % r 15% or greater_. % 6, Is project subsLantially contiguous to, or contain a building, site, or district, Iisred on the SLaLe or Natianal Registers of Wistorle Places? Yes M No 7- is project substantially contiguous Lo a site listed on the Register of National Natural Landmarks? El Yes ❑No 8, What is the depth of the water Lamle? (in feet) 9, Is site located over a primary, principal, air sale source aquifer? 0Yes Q NO 10 - Do hunting, fishing or shell fishing opporriunities presently exist in the project area? 11 Yes 0 No Page 3 of 21 Not Applicable 11. Dries project Site [ontgin any 5PM!e5 of plant or animal life that is identified a5 threatened or Rndangered? llYes EJ P40 Accordlnq to: each 12, Are there any unique or unusual land forms on the project site? (Le„ cliffs, uILMS, other geological Formations? ©Yes F7 No Describe; 13. Is the project site presently used by the community or neighborhood as an oprn space or recreation area? 11 Yes ❑ No IF ves. ex 14. Does the present site include scenic views knowon to he important to the community? 15. Streams wikhin or contiguous to oroiect arwu a. Name of Stream and name of Rive W uvhich it i5 tributary 16, Lakes, ponds, wetland areas wlthln Or contipUOU5 to oroiect area b. Size (in acres }l Page 4 of 21 MYes ONO 17. Is the site served by existing public utilities? ❑ Yes ❑ No Not Applicable a. If YES, does sufficient capacity exist to allow connection? ❑Yes No b. If YES, will improvements be necessary to allow connection? 11 Yes ❑No 18. Is the site located in an agricultural district certified pursuant to Agriculture and Markets Law, Article 25 -AA, Section 303 and 3047 ❑Yes ❑ No 19. Is the site located in or substantiall contiguous to a Critical Environmental Area designated pursuant to Article 8 of the ECL, and 6 NYCRR 6177 Length ❑Yes MNo 20. Has the site ever been used for the disposal of solid or hazardous wastes? B, Project Description ❑Yes 1:1 No 1. Physical dimensions and scale of project (fill in dimensions as appropriate), a. Total Contiguous acreage owned or controlled by project, sponsor. acres. b. Project acreage to be developed: acres initially; acres ultimately, c. Project acreage to remain undeveloped: acres, d. Length of project, in miles: (if appropriate) e. If the project is an expansion, indicate percent of expansion proposed. % f. Number of off•street parking spaces existing proposed g. Maximum vehicular trips generated per hour; (upon completion of project)? h. If residential: Number and type of housing units: One Family Initially Ultimately Two Family Multiple Family i. Dimensions (in feet) of largest proposed sifucture: height; width; j. Linear feet of frontage along a public thoroughfare project will occupy is1 fl:. Condominium 2. How much natural material Ci.e. rock, earth, etc.) will be removed from the site? tons/cubic yards. 3. Will disturbed areas be reclaimed ryes ❑ No ❑ NIA a. If yes, for what intended purpose is the site being reclaimed? b. Will topsoil be stockpiled for reclamation? ❑ Yes © No c. Will upper subsoil be stockpiled for reclamation? ❑ Yes ❑ No 4. How many acres of vegetation (trees, shrubs, ground covers) will be removed from site? Page 5 of 21 acres. length. 5. Will any mature forest (over 100 years old) or other locally- important vegetation be removed by this projecl7 ❑ Yes ❑ No Not Applicable 6. If single phase project: Anticipated period of construction: months, (including demolition) 7. If multi- phased: a. Total number of phases anticipated (number) b. Anticipated date of commencement phase 1: month c. Approximate completion date of final phase: month year, (including demolition) year. d. Is phase 1 functionally dependent on subsequent phases? ❑ Yes ❑ No B. Will blasting occur during construction? ® Yes 0 No 9. Number of jobs generated: during construction ; after project is complete 10. Number of jobs eliminated by this project 11. Will project require relocation of any projects or facilities? ❑ Yes ❑ No If yes, explain: 12, Is surface liquid waste disposal involved? ❑ Yes ❑No a. If yes, indicate type of waste (sewage, industrial, etc) and amount b. Name of water body into which effluent will be discharged 13. Is subsurface liquid waste disposal involved? ❑ Yes ❑ No Type 14. Will surface area of an existing water body increase or decrease by proposal? ❑Yes FINo If yes, explain: 15. Is project or any portion of project located in a 100 year flood plain? ❑ Yes ❑ No 16. Will the project generate solid waste? ❑ Yes ❑ No a, If yes, what is the amount per month? tons b. If yes, will an existing solid waste, facility be used? ❑ Yes ® No c. If yes, give name location d. Will any wastes not go into a sewage disposal system or into a sanitary landfill? Dyes Page 6 of 21 ❑ No e. If yes, explain: 17. Will the project involve the disposal of solid waste? ElYes ❑No a. If yes, what is the anticipated rate of disposal? tons/month. b. If yes, what is the anticipated site life? years. 18. Will project use herbicides or pesticides? F1 Yes © No 19, Will project routinely produce odors (more than one hour per day)? MYes 0 N 20. Will project produce operating noise exceeding the local ambient noise levels? El Yes F1 No 21. Will project result in an increase in energy use? 1:1 Yes M No If yes, Indicate type(s) 22, If water supply is from wells, indicate pumping capacity. gallons/minute, 23. Total anticipated water usage per day gallons /day. 24. Does project Involve Local, State or Federal funding? 17 Yes No If yes, explain: Page 7 of 21 25. Approvals Required: City, Town, Village Board ❑ Yes ® No City, Town, Village Planning Board ❑ Yes ❑ No City, Town Zoning Board ❑ Yes ❑ No City, County Health Department Yes ❑ No Other Local Agencies ❑ Yes ❑ No Other Regional Agencies ❑Yes ❑ No State Agencies ❑ Yes ❑ No Federal Agencies Dyes ❑No Not Applicable Type Submittal Date C. Zoning and Planning Information 1. Does proposed action involve a planning or zoning decision? Dyes 0 No If Yes, indicate decision required: ❑ Zoning amendment ® Zoning variance ❑ New/revision of master plan ❑ Subdivision ❑ Site plan © Special use permit ❑ Resource management plan ❑ Other Page 8 of 21 I 2. What is the zoning classification(s) of the site? 3. What is the maximum potential 4. What is the proposed zoning of the site? nt of the site if of Applicable as permitted by the zoni 5. What Is the maximum notential develonmPnr of the site if rlPvPlnned as normittpd by thr nrnnnved 7nninn7 6. IS the proposed action consistent with the recommended uses in adopted local land use plans? IF Yes ❑ No 7. What are the predominant land use(s) and zoning classifications within a A mile radius of proposed action? g. Is the proposed action compatible with adjoining/surrounding land uses with a 'A mile? ®Yes ®No 9. If the proposed action Is the subdivision of land, how many lots are proposed? a. What IS the rrtinimurn lot size proposed? Page 9 of 21 10. Will proposed action require any authorizations) for the for Not Applicable stricts? Yes ® No 11. Will the proposed action create a demand for any community provided services (recreation, education, police, fire protection? F1Yes ❑ No a. If yes, is existing capacity sufficient to handle projected demand? D Yes 1:1 No 12. Will the proposed action result in the generation of traffic significantly above present levels? ❑ Yes ❑ No a. If yes, is the existing road network adequate to handle, the additional traffic. Dyes El No D. Informational Details See Attached Documents Attach any additional information as may be needed to clarify your project. If there are or may be any adverse impacts associated with your proposal, please discuss such impacts and the measures which you propose to mitigate or avoid them. E. Verification I certify that the information provided above is true to the best of my knowtedge. Applicant /Sponsor Name Mary Ann Sumner pate he 15, 20) 1 1 Signature Title Town Supervisor If the action is in the Coastal Area, and you are a state agency, complete the Coastal Assessment Form before procceding with this assessment. Page 10 of 21 r PART 2 - PROJECT IMPACTS AND THEIR MAGNITUDE Responsibility of Lead Agency General Information (Read Carefully) In completing the form the reviewer should be guided by the question: Have my responses and determinations been reasonable? The reviewer is not expected to be an expert environmental analyst. The Examples provided are to assist the reviewer by showing types of impacts and wherever possible the threshold of magnitude that would trigger a response in column 2. The examples are generally applicable throughout the State and for most situations. But, for any specific projector site other examples and/or lower thresholds maybe appropriate for a Potential Large Impact response, thus requiring evaluation in Part 3. The impacts of each project, on each site, in each locality, will vary. Therefore, the examples are illustrative and have been offered as guidance. They do not constitute an exhaustive list of impacts and thresholds to answer each question. ! The number of examples per question does not indicate the importance of each question, ! In identifying impacts, consider long term, short term and cumulative effects. Instructions (Read carefully) a. Answer each of the 20 questions in PART 2, Answer Yes if there will be any impact. b. Maybe answers should be considered as Yes answers. C, If answering Yes to a question then check the appropriate box(column 1 or 2)to indicate the potential size of the impact. If impact threshold equals or exceeds any example provided, check column 2. If impact will occur but threshold is lower than example, check column 1. d. Identifying that an Impact will be potentially large (column 2) does not mean that it is also necessarily significant. Any large impact must be evaluated in PART 3 to determine significance, Identifying an impact in column 2 simply asks that it be looked at further. e. If reviewer has doubt about size of the impact then consider the impact as potentially large and proceed to PART 3. f. If a potentially large impact checked in column 2 can be mitigated by change(s) in the project to a small to moderate impact, also check the Yes box in column 3. A No response indicates that such a reduction is not possible. This must be explained in Part 3, Impact on Land 1. Will the Proposed Action result in a physical change to the project site? NO 0 YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Any construction on slopes of 15% or greater, (15 foot rise per 100 foot of length), or where the general slopes in the project area exceed 10 %. • Construction on land where the depth to the water table is less than 3 feet. • Construction of paved parking area for 1,000 or more vehicles. • Construction on land where bedrock is exposed or generally within 3 feet of existing ground surface. • Construction that will continue for more than 1 year or Involve more than one phase or stage. • Excavation for mining purposes that would remove more than 1,000 tons of natural material (i.e., rock or soil) per year, Page 11 of 21 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change 0 0 F1 Yes (E]No El 1:1 M Yes 0No 0 11 E] Yes QNo El 0 ❑ Yes QNo EJ 0 ® Yes ©No 0 0 ® Yes 0No 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change • Construction or expansion of a santary landfill. ❑ ❑ ©Yes ONO • Construction in a designated floodway. © 0 Dyes ❑No • Other impacts: © Q []Yes ONO 2, Will there bean effect to any unique or unusual land forms found on the site? (i.e., cliffs, dunes, geological formations, etc.) ❑NO ❑YES • Specific land forms: F ❑ Impact on Water 3. Will Proposed Action affect any water body designated as protected? (Under Articles 15, 24, 25 of the Environmental Conservation Law, ECL) El NO ❑YES ❑Yes ONO Examples that would apply to column 2 • Developable area of site contains a protected water body. ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No • Dredging more than 100 cubic yards of material from channel of ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No a protected stream. • Extension of utility distribution facilities through a protected water ❑ ❑ [:]Yes 1:1 No body. • Construction in a designated freshwater or tidal wetland. ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes 0 No • Other impacts: ❑ 0 0 Yes Q No 4. Will Proposed Action affect any non - protected existing or new body of water? ®NO ❑YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • A 10% increase or decrease in the surface area of any body of ❑ ® []Yes ❑ No water or more than a 10 acre increase or decrease. • Construction of a body of water that exceeds 10 acres of surface © ❑ Yes ❑ No area. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No Page 12 of 21 1 2 3 ® Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change 5. Will Proposed Action affect surface or groundwater quality or quantity? ❑NO ❑YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed Action will require a discharge permit. ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No • Proposed Action requires use of a source of water that does not ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No have approval to serve proposed (project) action. • Proposed Action requires water supply from wells with greater ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No than 45 gallons per minute pumping capacity. • Construction or operation causing any contamination of a water ❑ ❑ [:]Yes ❑ No supply system. • Proposed Action will adversely affect groundwater. ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No • Liquid effluent will be conveyed off the site to facilities which ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No presently do not exist or have inadequate capacity. • Proposed Action would use water in excess of 20,000 gallons ❑ ❑ I Yes ❑ No per day. • Proposed Action will likely cause siltation or other discharge into El r- ❑ Yes ❑ No ® an existing body of water to the extent that there will be an obvious visual contrast to natural conditions. • Proposed Action will require the storage of petroleum or ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes © No chemical products greater than 1,100 gallons. • Proposed Action will allow residential uses in areas without ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No water and/or sewer services. • Proposed Action locates commercial and/or industrial uses ❑ ❑ []Yes ❑ No which may require now or expansion of existing waste treatment and /or storage facilities. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ [Dyes ❑ No Page 13 of 21 1 2 3 ® Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change 6. Will Proposed Action alter drainage flow or patterns, or surface water runoff? ❑NO ❑YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed Action would change flood water flows ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No • Proposed Action may cause substantial erosion, ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No • Proposed Action is incompatible with existing drainage patterns. ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No • Proposed Action will allow development in a designated ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes []No floodway. • Other impacts: ❑ El ❑Yes ❑No IMPACT ON AIR 7. Will Proposed Action affect air quality? ❑NO El YES Examples that would apply to column 2 _ • Proposed Action will induce 1,000 or more vehicle trips in any ❑ ❑ Oyes []No given hour. • Proposed Action will result in the incineration of more than 1 ton ❑ ❑ [:]Yes ❑ No of refuse per hour. • Emission rate of total contaminants will exceed 5 lbs. per hour ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No or a heat source producing more than 10 million BTU's per hour. • Proposed Action will allow an increase in the amount of land ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No committed to industrial use_ • Proposed Action will allow an increase in the density of I ❑ ❑Yes ❑No industrial development within existing industrial areas. • Other impacts: ❑ 0 ❑Yes ❑No IMPACT ON PLANTS AND ANIMALS 8. Will Proposed Action affect any threatened or endangered species? ❑ NO in YES Examples that would apply to column 2 © ❑ • Reduction of one or more species listed on the New York or Federal list, using the site, over or near the site, or found on the site. Page 14 of 21 Dyes ❑No 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change • Removal of any portion of a critical or significant wildlife habitat. ❑ ❑ QYes ❑No • Application of pesticide or herbicide more than twice a year, ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑No other than for agricultural purposes. • Other impacts: ❑ ® ❑Yes ❑No g, Will Proposed Action substantially affect non - threatened or non - endangered species? ❑NO El YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed Action would substantially interfere with any resident © ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No or migratory fish, shellfish or wildlife species. • Proposed Action requires the removal of more than 10 acres of ❑ ❑ ❑Yes No mature forest (over 100 years of age) or other locally important vegetation. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No IMPACT ON AGRICULTURAL LAND RESOURCES 10. Will Proposed Action affect agricultural land resources? ❑ NO ❑ YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • The Proposed Action would sever, cross or limit access to El ❑ 0 Yes ❑ No agricultural land (includes cropland, hayflelds, pasture, vineyard, orchard, etc.) • Construction activity would excavate or compact the soil profile of ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No agricultural land. • The Proposed Action would irreversibly convert more than 10 ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No acres of agricultural land or, if located in an Agricultural District, more than 2.5 acres of agricultural land. Page 15 of 21 • The Proposed Action would disrupt or prevent installation of agricultural land management systems (e.g., subsurface drain lines, outlet ditches, strip cropping); or create a need for such measures (e.g. cause a farm field to drain poorly due to increased runoff). • Other impacts; IMPACT ON AESTHETIC RESOURCES 11. Will Proposed Action affect aesthetic resources? (If necessary, use the Visual EAF Addendum in Section 617.20, Appendix B.) NO ❑ YES 1 Small to Moderate Impact 2 Potential Large Impact 3 Can Impact Be Mitigated by Project Change ❑ Yes ❑ No El Yes El No Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed land uses, or project components obviously different ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No from or in sharp contrast to current surrounding land use patterns, whether man -made or natural. • Proposed land uses, or project components visible to users of ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No aesthetic resources which will eliminate or significantly reduce their enjoyment of the aesthetic qualities of that resource. • Project components that will result in the elimination or ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No significant screening of scenic views known to be important to the area. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ El Yes 1:1 No IMPACT ON HISTORIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES 12, Will Proposed Action impact any site or structure of historic, prehistoric or paleontological importance? ❑NO 1:1 YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed Action occurring wholly or partially within or I ❑ © Yes ❑ No substantially contiguous to any facility or site listed on the State or National Register of historic places. • Any impact to an archaeological site or fossil bed located within ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No the project site. • Proposed Action will occur in an area designated as sensitive ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No for archaeological sites on the NYS Site Inventory. Page 16 of 21 • Other impacts: - IMPACT ON OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 13. Will proposed Action affect the quantity or quality of existing or future open spaces or recreational opportunities? ❑ NO DYES 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No Examples that would apply to column 2 • The permanent foreclosure of a future recreational opportunity. ❑ 0 1:1 Yes ❑No • A major reduction of an open space important to the community. 0 ® ❑ Yes ❑ No • Other impacts: ❑ 0 ❑Yes ❑No IMPACT ON CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL AREAS 14. Will Proposed Action impact the exceptional or unique characteristics of a critical environmental area (CEA) established pursuant to subdivision 6NYCRR 617.14(g)? ONO ❑YES List the environmental characteristics that caused the designation of the CEA. Examples that would apply to column 2 _ • Proposed Action to locate within the CEA? ❑ © I Yes ❑No • Proposed Action will result in a reduction in the quantity of the ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑No resource? • Proposed Action will result in a reduction in the quality of the ❑ ❑ ID Yes ❑No resource? • Proposed Action will impact the use, function or enjoyment of the ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑No resource? • Other impacts: 0 Cl [Dyes ❑No Page 17 of 21 ® 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION 15. Will there be an effect to existing transportation systems? E NO [] YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Alteration of present patterns of movement of people andior ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No goods. • Proposed Action will result in major traffic problems. ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No Other impacts: ❑ ❑ ❑Yes []No IMPACT ON ENERGY 16. Will Proposed Action affect the community's sources of fuel or energy supply? []NO ❑YI=S Examples that would apply to column 2 • Proposed Action will cause a greater than 5% Increase in the ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No use of any form of energy in the municipality. • Proposed Action will require the creation or extension of an ❑ ❑ Dyes IF] No energy transmission or supply system to serve more than 50 single or two family residences or to serve a major commercial or industrial use. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ El Yes ❑ No NOISE AND ODOR IMPACT 17. Will there be objectionable odors, noise, or vibration as a result of the Proposed Action? ©NO [] YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • Blasting within 1,500 feet of a hospital, school or other sensitive ❑ ❑ ❑Yes © No facility. • Odors will occur routinely (more than one hour per day). ❑ ❑ Dyes ❑ No • Proposed Action will produce operating noise exceeding the © Q Dyes ❑ No local ambient noise levels for noise outside of structures. • Proposed Action will remove natural barriers that would act as a ❑ Q ❑Yes ❑ No noise screen. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ ED Yes ❑ No Page 18 of 21 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change IMPACT ON PUBLIC HEALTH 18. Will Proposed Action affect public health and safety? []NO ❑YES • Proposed Action may cause a risk of explosion or release of ❑ ❑ Dyes ❑No hazardous substances (i.e. oil, pesticides, chemicals, radiation, etc.) in the event of accident or upset conditions, or there may be a chronic low level discharge or emission. • Proposed Action may result in the burial of "hazardous wastes' ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No in any form (i.e. toxic, poisonous, highly reactive, radioactive, irritating, infectious, etc.) • Storage facilities for one million or more gallons of liquefied ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No natural gas or other flammable liquids. • Proposed Action may result in the excavation or other © ❑ ❑Yes ❑No disturbance within 2,000 feet of a site used for the disposal of solid or hazardous waste. • Other impacts: ❑ ❑ Dyes []No IMPACT ON GROWTH AND CHARACTER OF COMMUNITY OR NEIGHBORHOOD 19. Will Proposed Action affect the character of the existing community? ❑ NO ©YES Examples that would apply to column 2 • The permanent population of the city, town or village in which the © ❑ ❑Yes ONO project is located is likely to grow by more than 5 %. • The municipal budget for capital expenditures or operating ❑ ❑ ❑Yes i No services will increase by more than 5% per year as a result of this project. • Proposed Acflon will conflict with officially adopted plans or © ❑ Dyes ❑No goals. • Proposed Action will cause a change in the density of land use. ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑No • Proposed Action will replace or eliminate existing facilities, ❑ ❑ ❑Yes ❑ No structures or areas of historic importance to the community. • Development will create a demand for additional community ❑ ❑ Dyes []No services (e.g. schools, police and fire, etc.) Page 19 of 21 1 2 3 Small to Potential Can Impact Be Moderate Large Mitigated by Impact Impact Project Change • Proposed Action will set an important precedent for future I ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No projects, • Proposed Action will create or eliminate employment. ❑ ❑ ❑ Yes ❑ No • Other impacts: 0 ❑ [:]Yes ❑ No 20. Is there, or is there likely to be, public controversy related to potential adverse environment impacts? [7 NO ©YES If Any Action in Part 2 Is Identified as a Potential Large Impact or If you Cannot Determine the Magnitude of Impact, Proceed to Part 3 Page 20 of 21 Part 3 = EVALUATION OF THE IMPORTANCE OF IMPACTS Responsibility of Lead Agency Part 3 must be prepared if one or more impact(s) is considered to be potentially large, even if the Impact(s) may be mitigated. Instructions (If you need more space, attach additional sheets) Discuss the following for each impact identified in Column 2 of Part 2: 1. Briefly describe the impact. 2. Describe (if applicable) how the impact could be mitigated or reduced to a small to moderate impact by project change(s). 3. Based on the information available, decide if it is reasonable to conclude that this impact is important. To answer the question of importance, consider. I The probability of the impact occurring I The duration of the impact I Its irreversibility, including permanently lost resources of value I Whether the impact can or will be controlled I The regional consequence of the impact 1 Its potential divergence from local needs and goals I Whether known objections to the project relate to this impact. Page 21 of 21 Town of Dryden "Zoning Ordinance Amendments SEQRA Review - Long Environmental Assessment Form Part 1 D. Informational Details D.1. SEORA and Zoning Law Amendments The amendment of a zoning law affecting the allowable uses of greater than 25 acres of property are Type l Actions as defined by the State Environmental Quality Review Act NYCRR 617.4(b)(2). This is due primarily to capture those changes in zoning of a magnitude that may trigger the need for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The need for an EIS is essentially the purpose of an Environmental Assessment Form. As a Type I Action, the Town of Dryden is required to fill out a long Environmental Assessment Form when adopting such changes to zoning. However, the long Environmental Assessment Form is not at all designed to evaluate the environmental impact of a proposed law, or amendments to an existing law. That being the case, the form itself in this case has been filled out as Not Applicable (NA) choosing rather to discuss the environmental assessment in Part D. of the form, which allows for supplemental information to be included with the long EAF. Although the proposed amendments to the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance represent a significant prohibition in the law, the substance is much the same as the existing law. The crux of environmental impact for a law of this type depends upon ® only a few perspectives. First, does it introduce new land uses that by their nature have a measurable negative impact on the environmental resources? Second, is the intent of the law and the environmental assessment to supersede future environmental assessment and expedite or mitigate impacts of allowed uses? Third, does the law, by the nature of its wording and approval process somehow introduce land uses in inappropriate areas, or more specifically does it not adequately separate incompatible land uses either in the town, or in a neighboring municipality"? And finally a fourth issue is whether or not the law follows and is consistent with an adopted Comprehensive Plan? D.2. Introduction of New Land Uses The proposed zoning amendments for the Town of Dryden do not introduce new uses, but rather prohibit uses that are not listed as allowed uses, namely gas drilling and exploration (see Exhibit A: PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO TOWN OF DRYDEN ZONING ORDINANCE). Because this use was not authorized in any way by the zoning ordinance to date, there is essentially no impact as a result of the prohibition. Q.3. Supersedingy Environmental Assessments In order for an environmental assessment to supersede fixture environmental assessments, this document would have to be what is known as a Generic Environmental Impact Statement which would consider the full build out potential of a district, or all districts, and evaluate the environmental impacts of that build out, and identify mitigation measures of the impacts resulting from the development. Future projects are then permitted and reviewed relative to the generic EIS, rather than evaluated individually. This adoption process does not intend to create in any way a generic environmental evaluation of development allowed by the law. Each project proposed in the town that is subject to a permit from the town, except those of an administrative nature such as building or zoning permits, will undergo the appropriate environmental review at the time a decision is made by the appropriate board ('Town, Planning or Zoning Board of Appeals). Because this amendment specifically prohibits a use, that use will not be allowed and therefore will not be assessed for environmental impact. D.4. Separation of Incompatible Uses The proposed amendments clarify a prohibition of a use, bas drilling and exploration, and therefore no assessment of impacts to neighboring properties is necessary. D.S. Comprehensive Plan Consistency New York State Town Law requires that zoning laws are consistent with an adopted comprehensive plan. Because of this, many comprehensive plans are followed with appropriate land use law updates normally the zoning and subdivision laws. These proposed amendments are not in direct response to the 1.968 General Plan, nor the 2005 Comprehensive Plan, but are rather in response to recent expansion of ® gas drilling in New York State, and the recent and historical interest of these operations in obtaining leases in the town. However, both the 1968 and 2005 plans stress the rural nature of the Town of Dryden, and taking measures to protect those resources, especially the water resources, as well as agriculture and forestry resources. The proposed amendments are based upon the premise of protecting the resources in the Town of Dryden and thereby are consistent with these plans. D.6. Environmental Impact Determination In consideration of the above information, it is apparent that adoption of the proposed Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance amendments will have no measurable detrimental environmental impact. The amendments are intended to provide protection of the environment. Therefore the only reasonable result of this assessment would be a Negative Declaration in accordance with NYCRR 617. ® Exhibit A SEQRA bong Dorm E'AF PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO TowN OF DRYDEN ZONING ORDINANCE The 'Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance is hereby amended as follows: Appendix A (Definitions) is amended by adding new definitions to read as follows: "Natural Gas" shall mean any gaseous substwice, either combustible or noncombustible, which is produced in a natural state from the earth and which maintains a gaseous or rarified state at standard temperature and pressure conditions, and /or gaseous components or vapors occurring in or derived from petroleum or other hydrocarbons. "Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Exploration" shall mean geologic or geophysical activities related to the search for natural gas, petroleum or other subsurface hydrocarbons including prospecting, geophysical and geologic seismic surveying and sampling techniques, which include but are not limited to core or rotary drilling or making an excavation in the search and evaluation of natural gas, petroleum, or other subsurface hydrocarbon deposits. "Natural Gas and /or Petroleum Exploration and Production Materials" shall mean any solid, semi - solid, liquid, semi - liquid or gaseous material used in the exploration or extraction of natural gas. ® "Natural Gas Exploration and /or Petroleum Production Wastes" shall mean any garbage, refuse, cuttings, sludge, flow -back fluids, produced waters or other discarded materials, including solid, liquid, semi - solid, or contained gaseous material that results from or is associated with the exploration, drilling or extraction of natural gas and/or petroleum. "Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Extraction" shall mean the digging or drilling of a well for the purposes of exploring for, developing or producing natural gas, petroleum or other subsurface hydrocarbons. "Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Support Activities" shall mean the construction, use, or maintenance; of a storage or staging yard, a water or fluid injection station, a water or fluid gathering station, a natural gas or petroleum storage facility, or a natural gas or petroleum gathering line, venting station, or compressor associated with the exploration or extraction of natural gas or petroleum. 2. Article XXI (Miscellaneous) is amended by adding anew Section 2104 to read as follows: "Section 2104. Prohibited Uses. (1) Prohibition against the Exploration for or Extraction of Natural Gas and/or Petroleum. No land in the Town shall be used: to conduct any exploration for natural gas and/or petroleum; to drill any well for natural gas and/or petroleum; to transfer, store, process or treat natural gas and /or petroleum; or to dispose of natural gas and/or petroleum exploration or production wastes; or to erect any derrick, building, or other structure; or to place any machinery or equipment for any such purposes. (2) Prohibition against the Storage, Treatment and Disposal of Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Exploration and Production Materials. No land in the Town shall be used for: the storage, transfer, treatment and/or disposal of natural gas and/or petroleum exploration and production materials. (3) Prohibition against the Storage, Treatment and Disposal of Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Exploration and Production Wastes. No land in the Town shall be used for: the storage, transfer, treatment and /or disposal of natural gas and /or petroleum exploration and production wastes. (4) Prohibition against Natural Gas and/or Petroleum Support Activities. No land in the Town shall be used for natural gas and/or petroleum support activities. (5) Invalidity of Permits. No permit issued by any local, state or federal agency, commission or board for a use which would violate the prohibitions of this section or of this Ordinance shall be deemed valid within the Town," 3. The introductory paragraph of Subsection I of Section 806 (Quarries and Excavation, Topsoil Removal) of Article XIII (DISTRICT REGULATION: R -C ZONES) is amended to read as follows: "l. The Town Board may authorize the issuance of a special permit for the excavation and sale of topsoil, sand, gravel, clay or other natural solid mineral or vegetable deposit, or the quarrying of any kind of rock formation in the R -C and R -D Zones only. No sand or gravel or other excavation operation, except a topsoil removal operation, shall be conducted on land of less than 20 acres in area, The Town Board must be guided by the public health, safety and general welfare, not only of the citizens of the Town of Dryden, but of any other municipality, and must give particular consideration to certain factors as follows:" 4. These amendments shall take effect upon adoption and publication as provided bylaw. 1. Call Meeting to Order 2. Pledge of Allegiance 3. Roll Call 4, 5. Unfinished Business Dryden Town Board Meeting Dryden-Town Hall 93 East Main Street Wednesday, August 2, 2011 � 7:00 PM a. Re- schedule Clarity Connect Public Hearing for 8/17/2011 b. Resolution in Support of Adopting Amendments to the Town of Dryden Zoning Ordinance Clarifying die Town's prohibition of Natural Gas Exploration and Extraction c. Zoning Law 6. New Business a. Marriage Officer 7. Future Agenda Items a. Clarity Connect Public Hearing b. Dedrick gravel mine application c. Schedule budget meetings d. Request to extend tax deadline up to five business days e. Planning Board recommendation for Open Development Area 8. Information Items a. Monday, August l @ County Budget Information Meeting b. Saturday, August 6 — Dryden Lake Festival c. Tuesday, August 23 @ Varna Community Center — Redistricting Commission information d. Community Foundation Grant deadline — September 23, 2011 c. The new HVHF Advisory Panel, charged with developing recommendations to avoid and mitigate impacts to local governments and communities, does not actually include any representatives of local governments and communities. f TCCOG is proposing an agreement with Greenplan, Inc to prepare a Tompkins County Community Land Use Analysis and Impact Assessment — cost NTE g 10;000. g. August 16 — public hearing for Tompkins County Road Preservation Law h. Vacancy on Water Resources Council 9. Executive Session (if necessary) The Next Abstract and Agenda meeting will be Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 7:30 PM Town Uf Dryden Town Board Meeting August 2, 2011 Name - {Plcase Print) W r) �avll�- nvlc3 C Ioj-6V R r `1L Address or Board V 9�3 zv 4� 1 q //�AOOL/ f/a7/4 Ca` N f gren ol�, C(�al r, Y . CKQ W H GV er fA k. ,e. r 05 60 ln V tle f 4 N r-ErL' L Pv r y- " Ib6s��l;s t4oJJOv K j5Arl l r )3q Sn, Town of Dryden Town Board Meeting August 2, 2011 Name - {Please' Print aV4svle4vl k"7x en2_ Address or Board / r Z 614- Z12d JeLlAA f ps �,"�� l�r�'�el., r Ll j vp Ac. L4 4k � Oav Na. f lye r ff x "7. cep ;0 7d Eien,.,, Y1,� tc;7 - vo r e�� G 4R '0 tv6co I, c Lj13 J L 4 I1 4/1 Z, k1c, cu f4 ,,, , A( OP I StopN krcLy 7 Ri�� W Nt� Tow" of Dryden Town Board Meeting August 2, 20] 1 Name - €PleasgLjFrint Ou mob Cn Ern rnl 0 a46N 34) 04)U15ki tv ftWc Y rn I L L E � Address or Board 3 6q, A( �d 1 I' l 1 of I I N` f .+1 � r