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MN-PDB-2016-02-23DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 1 W ITH CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS SUGGESTED BY J.G.S.: Proposed deleted language shown in purple strikethrough type; proposed new language shown in red type. (Some minor non-substantive improvements to grammar or wording with no effect on sentence meaning are not highlighted.) Planning and Development Board Minutes February 23, 2016 Board Members Attending: Mark Darling; Jack Elliott; McKenzie Jones-Rounds; Robert Aaron Lewis; C.J. Randall; John Schroeder Board Members Absent: Garrick Blalock, Chair Board Vacancies: None Staff Attending: JoAnn Cornish, Director, Division of Planning and Economic Development; Lisa Nicholas, Senior Planner, Division of Planning and Economic Development; Charles Pyott, Office Assistant, Division of Planning and Economic Development Applicants Attending: Chain Works District Redevelopment Project at 620 S. Aurora Street James Gensel, Fagan Engineers & Land Surveyors, P.C. 101-107 Morris Avenue George Frantz, Tioga Urbanscapes, LLC 210 Hancock Street, Redevelopment of Entire Block Peter Trowbridge, Trowbridge Wolf Michaels, LLP; Jow Bowes, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services Hughes Hall Renovations at Cornell University Andrew Magre, Cornell University; Gilbert Delgado, Cornell University Canopy Ithaca (Hilton Hotel) at 320-324 E. M.L.K., Jr. / E. State Street DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 2 Scott Whitham, Whitham Planning & Design, LLC; Catherine DeAlmeida, Whitham Planning & Design, LLC; Frank Russo, spg3 Architects; Neil Patel, Ithaca Downtown Associates, LLC / Baywood Hotels Brindley Street Bridge at Cayuga Inlet (Bridge Systems Engineer Addisu Gebre was not available.) Parking for 5 Cars at 424 Dryden Road Daniel R. Hirtler, Flatfield Designs; Angie Chen, Owner Cornell Ag. Ag Quad Renovations at Cornell University Davies Orinda, Cornell University Maplewood Apartments at Veteran’s Place (Sketch Plan) Scott Whitham, Whitham Planning & Design, LLC; Catherine DeAlmeida, Whitham Planning & Design, LLC; Siva Venkataramini; Torti Gallas & Partners Architects, Inc.; Jeffrey Resetco, EdR Trust; Jeremy Thomas, Cornell University Maguire Automotive Project at Carpenter Business Park (Sketch Plan) Thomas Schickel, Schickel Architecture; Phil Maguire, Owner Schroeder called the meeting to order at 6:05 p.m. (Chair Blalock was unable to attend.) 1. Agenda Review No changes were made to the agenda. Note: Some agenda items were not reviewed in the original agenda sequence, due to agenda item 2 taking much less time than had been allocated. 2. Special Order of Business A. Chain Works District Redevelopment Project, 620 S. Aurora Street, Scott Whitham & Jamie Gensel for David Lubin of UnChained Properties, LLC. Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (dGEIS) Adequacy Discussion. The proposed Chain Works District seeks to redevelop and rehabilitate the +/- 800,000-SF former Morse Chain / Emerson Power Transmission facility, located on a 95-acre parcel DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 3 traversing the City and Town of Ithaca’s municipal boundary. The applicant has applied to Common Council for a Planned Unit Development (PUD) for development of a mixed-use district, which includes residential, commercial, office, and manufacturing. The project is a mixed-use development consisting of four primary phases: (1) the redevelopment of four existing buildings (21, 24, 33, & 34); (2) the repurposing of the remaining existing buildings; (3) potential future development within areas of the remainder of the site adjacent to the existing buildings/parking areas; and (4) future developments within remaining areas of the site. This is a Type I Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance, §176-4 B. (6), and the State Environmental Quality Review Act, §617.4 (b)(3), for which the Lead Agency made a Positive Declaration of Environmental Significance on October 28, 2014, and adopted a Scope for the GEIS on January 13, 2015. Randall said she is recusing herself from consideration of the project because she worked on preparation of the dGEIS. (Randall departed at 6:07 p.m.) Jamie Gensel of Fagan Engineers & Land Surveyors, P.C. noted that the Planning Board has received the Town of Ithaca’s comments. Nicholas pointed out that City staff had met with the project team and suggested revisions numerous times before the dGEIS was completed and had also reviewed the document’s adequacy for public review. Nicholas explained that the spreadsheet provided to the Board should facilitate keeping track of all comments regarding adequacy so far received. She said the Board should review these comments and determine if it would like the Town of Ithaca’s comments to be addressed for adequacy purposes. Schroeder indicated he would need to set aside some time to thoroughly read through the documents. Nicholas suggested that Planning staff generate recommendations for addressing the Town of Ithaca’s comments. It was the consensus of the Board to follow this procedure. It was also suggested that any Board members with adequacy concerns communicate these issues to Nicholas prior to the next Board meeting, so she could compile them. 3. Privilege of the Floor John Lewis, executive director of Historic Ithaca, spoke in support of “Bridge Alternative 2” in City Bridge Systems Engineer Addisu Gebre’s February 1, 2016 memorandum regarding the proposed new Brindley Street Bridge. (Randall returned at 6:18 p.m.) DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 4 Susan Austern, 411 Willow Avenue, spoke in opposition to the 210 Hancock Street project, stating that neighborhood residents do not perceive the area as “blighted,” as it was once characterized. She also believes the project violates the Comprehensive Plan, which establishes the City’s goal for establishing medium-density development in the area. Schroeder replied he does not believe the project is at all inconsistent with the Comprehensive Plan, which recommends that no significant changes be made to this neighborhood’s existing character of neighborhoods be preserved. He said the dwelling units per acre figure for this neighborhood in the Comprehensive Plan is explicitly identified as an average. Furthermore, he said, the 210 Hancock Street site has been zoned for business use for decades; that, therefore, is part of this neighborhood’s existing character. 4. Subdivision Review A. Minor Subdivision, 210 Hancock Street, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services (INHS). Public Hearing and Consideration of Preliminary & Final Approval. The applicant is proposing to consolidate the existing two tax parcels (#35.-3-1 and #35.-3-3) and subdivide the resulting 2.012-acre (87,729.84 SF) parcel into two lots: Parcel A, measuring approximately 43,560 SF (1.631 acres) with 166 feet of frontage on Hancock St., 326 feet on First St., and approximately 100 feet on Adams St. (excluding portions of Adams St. that have been discontinued); and Parcel B, measuring approximately 16,596.36 SF (0.381 acres) with 101.46 feet of frontage on Hancock St. The resultant addresses will be Parcel A, 210 Hancock St., and Parcel B, 202 Hancock St. The project is in the B-2a Zoning District which has a minimum lot size of 3,000 SF and minimum street frontage of 35 feet and minimum front, side and rear yards of 0 feet, 10/5 feet, and 15% or 20 feet, but no less than 10 feet, respectively. The purpose of the Subdivision is to implement the Site Plan for the project, approved on August 25, 2015. This is a Type 1 Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”) and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”) for which the Planning Board, acting as Lead Agency, made a Negative Declaration of Environmental Significance on May 26, 2015. Applicants Peter Trowbridge, Trowbridge Wolf Michaels Landscape Architects, LLP; and Joseph Bowes, Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services (INHS) described the proposed Subdivision, and noted there was concern at the December November 2015 Planning Board meeting that some of the townhouse fencing (which then extended up to six feet high) was too tall and should be more residential in scale. He said the applicants have subsequently reduced the height to 3 feet (stepping up to 4 feet near the entry gates). He added that the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for the project has also now been provided. Schroeder noted prior versions of project drawings show lighting bollards at the oval park feature within the green space replacing Lake Avenue, but these do not appear on the current drawings. Trowbridge replied it is most likely a technical error. The applicants will ensure they are accurately reflected in the future. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 5 Bowes replied that the City will continue to own the Lake Avenue property, and maintenance of the lights on that street will remain the City’s responsibility, so it was decided to leave the existing lights there, without adding any new ones. Schroeder responded that the new oval green space would look better and feel safer with more lights. Bowes replied that the applicants could would broach that subject with the City. Schroeder observed the proposed vehicular loading spaces near Adams Street include green screens on two sides, but not on the Cascadilla Creek side. Trowbridge and Bowes replied that the applicants could would look into green-screening that additional side. Public Hearing On a motion by Darling, seconded by Elliott, and approved unanimously, Schroeder opened the Public Hearing. Susan Austern, 411 Willow Avenue, spoke in opposition to the 210 Hancock Street project, reiterating her belief that the project violates the Comprehensive Plan. She noted most of the surrounding houses are 1-2 stories tall, while the project’s multi-family building will be 4 stories tall. There being no further public comments, on a motion by Elliott, seconded by Lewis, and approved unanimously, Schroeder closed the Public Hearing. Adopted Resolution for Preliminary and Final Subdivision Approval: On a motion by Lewis, seconded by Jones-Rounds: WHEREAS: an application has been submitted for review and approval by the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board for a Minor Subdivision of City of Ithaca tax parcels #35.-3-1 and #35.-3-3, located at 423 First St. and 210 Hancock St., respectively. The parcels will be consolidated first, then subdivided. The application is by Joe Bowes for Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services (INHS), and WHEREAS: the applicant is proposing to consolidate the existing two tax parcels (#35.- 3-1 and #35.-3-3) and subdivide the resulting 2.012-acre (87,729.84 SF) parcel into two lots: Parcel A, measuring approximately 43,560 SF (1.631 acres) with 166 feet of frontage on Hancock St., 326 feet on First St., and approximately 100 feet on Adams St. (excluding portions of Adams St. that have been discontinued); and Parcel B, measuring approximately 16,596.36 SF (0.381 acres) with 101.46 feet of frontage on Hancock St. The resultant addresses will be Parcel A, 210 Hancock St., and Parcel B, 202 Hancock St. The project is in the B-2a Zoning District which has a minimum lot size of 3,000 SF and minimum street frontage of 35 feet and minimum front, side and rear yards of 0 feet, 10/5 feet, and 15% or 20 feet, but no less than 10 feet, respectively, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 6 WHEREAS: the purpose of the proposed Subdivision is to implement the Site Plan for the 210 Hancock Street project, approved by the Planning and Development Board on August 25, 2015, and WHEREAS: this is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance and the State Environmental Quality Review Act, and WHEREAS: the Planning Board did on May 26, 2015 determine the proposed project, including the Subdivision, would result in no significant impact and did make a Negative Determination of Environmental Significance, and WHEREAS: this is considered a Minor Subdivision in accordance with the City of Ithaca Code, Chapter 290, Article 1, §290-1, Minor Subdivision – Any subdivision of land resulting in creation of a maximum of one additional buildable lot, and WHEREAS: legal notice was published and property posted in accordance with Chapters 276-6 B. (4) and 176-12 A. (2) (c) of the City of Ithaca Code, and WHEREAS: the Planning and Development Board held the required Public Hearing on February 23, 2016, and WHEREAS: the Tompkins County Planning Department and other interested parties have been given the opportunity to comment on the proposed project and any comments received have been considered, and WHEREAS: this Board did on February 23, 2016 review and accept as adequate: a Subdivision plat entitled “Subdivision map No. 210 Hancock Street and No. 423 First Street, City of Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York,” dated 11/24/15, and prepared by T.G. Miller, P.C.; and other application materials, and WHEREAS: the Planning and Development Board recognizes that information received and reviewed for this Subdivision indicates the resultant parcels have received the required Area Variances from area requirements in the B-2a Zoning District, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board does hereby grant preliminary and final subdivision approval to the proposed subdivision located at 210 Hancock and 423 First Streets subject to submission of three (3) paper copies of the final approved plat, all having a raised seal and signature of a registered licensed surveyor. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None B. Minor Subdivision, 101-107 Morris Avenue, George Frantz for Habitat for Humanity. Consideration of Preliminary & Final Approval. The applicant is proposing to consolidate the existing two tax parcels (#44.-5-5 & #44.-5-6). The DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 7 applicant proposes to subdivide the resulting 6,154-SF (0.141-acre) parcel into two lots: Lot 1, measuring approximately 3,076 SF 2,949 SF with 31 feet of frontage on Third Ave.; and Lot 2, measuring approximately 3,078 SF 3,205 SF with 30 feet of frontage on Third Ave. The resultant parcels will have Third Street addresses. The applicant intends to construct two affordable owner-occupied homes. The project is in the R-2b Zoning District, which has a minimum lot size of 3,000 SF for one- or two-family homes, minimum street frontage of 35 feet and minimum front, side and rear yards of 25 feet, 10 feet, 10 feet and 25% or 50 feet, but no less than 20 feet, respectively. The project requires has received required Area Variances. This is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”) and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), and is subject to environmental review. Applicant George Frantz, Tioga Urbanscapes, LLC, presented a brief update on the proposed Subdivision, noting it has received its Zoning Variances. Adopted Resolution for Preliminary and Final Subdivision Approval: On a motion by Lewis, seconded by Darling: WHEREAS: an application has been submitted for review and approval by the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board for a Minor Subdivision of City of Ithaca tax parcels: #44.-5-5 and #44.-5-6, located at 101 and 107 Morris Ave. The parcels will be consolidated first, then subdivided. The application is by George Frantz for Habitat for Humanity, and WHEREAS: the applicant is proposing to consolidate the existing two tax parcels (#44.- 5-5 and #44.-5-6) and subdivide the resulting 6.154-SF 6,154-SF (0.141 acre) parcel into two lots: Lot 1, measuring approximately 2,949 SF with 31 feet of frontage on Third Ave.; and Lot 2, measuring approximately 3,205 SF with 30 feet of frontage on Third Ave. The resultant parcels will have Third Street addresses. The applicant intends to construct two semi-detached, affordable for-sale homes. The project is in the R-2b Zoning District which has a minimum lot size of 3,000 SF for one- or two-family homes, minimum street frontage of 35 feet, and minimum front, side and rear yards of 25 feet, 10 feet, 10 feet and 25% or 50 feet, but no less than 20 feet, respectively. The project received Area Variances, and WHEREAS: this is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance and the State Environmental Quality Review Act, both of which require environmental review, and WHEREAS: this is considered a Minor Subdivision in accordance with the City of Ithaca Code, Chapter 290, Article 1, §290-1, Minor Subdivision – Any subdivision of land resulting in creation of a maximum of one additional buildable lot, and WHEREAS: the Planning Board, being the local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, did on January 26, 2016 declare itself Lead Agency for the environmental review of this action, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 8 WHEREAS: legal notice was published and property posted in accordance with Chapters 276-6 B. (4) and 176-12 A. (2) (c) of the City of Ithaca Code, and WHEREAS: the Planning and Development Board held the required Public Hearing on January 26, 2016, and WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Conservation Advisory Council, Tompkins County Planning Department, and other interested parties have been given the opportunity to comment on the proposed project and any comments received have been considered, and WHEREAS: this Board, acting as Lead Agency in environmental review, did on January 26, 2016 review and accept as adequate: a Short Environmental Assessment Form (SEAF), Part 1, submitted by the applicant, and Part 2, prepared by Planning staff; a draft Subdivision plat entitled “Habitat for Humanity Proposed Re-Subdivision of Tax Parcels #44.-5-5 and #44.-5-6, ” dated 1/7/16, and prepared by George R. Frantz & Associates; and other application materials, and WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board did, on January 26, 2016 determine the proposed Subdivision would result in no significant impact on the environment, and WHEREAS: the Planning and Development Board recognizes that information received and reviewed for this Subdivision indicates the resultant parcels have received the required Area Variances from area requirements in the R-2b Zoning District, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board does hereby grant Preliminary and Final Subdivision Approval to the proposed Subdivision located at 101 and 107 Morris Ave., subject to submission of three (3) paper copies of the final approved plat, all having a raised seal and signature of a registered licensed surveyor. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None 5. Site Plan Review A. Hughes Hall Renovations, Cornell University Campus, Ram Venkat for Cornell University. Declaration of Lead Agency & Public Hearing. The applicant is proposing to renovate four levels of Hughes Hall in order to improve academic space use. Exterior and site modifications include: enclosing existing ground-floor loggia; a new entry from the courtyard; a new exterior stair tower on a west façade; and renovations to the gorge- facing dining terrace, including a new entrance and stair. The project includes removal and redesign of the courtyard area to include new paving, seating, lighting, walkway, bike racks, landscaping, and drainage improvements. The project is in the U-1 Zoning DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 9 District. This is a Type 1 Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”), §176-4 B(1)(h)[2], and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), §617.4(b)(11), and is subject to Environmental Review. Applicants Andrew Magre and Gilbert Delgado of Cornell University described the proposed project update, noting a few refinements were made since the last Planning Board meeting. Schroeder remarked that several issues emerged at the Project Review Committee meeting. Committee members asked if the plaza area sidewalk could be made to loop around, thereby eliminating the gap between it and the landscaping stairs at the loading dock could have a short sidewalk loop connecting them to the associated driveway. Also, the lighting fixtures in the interior loggia appear to be of the same design as fixtures producing nighttime glare in the new common room space facing the Myron / Anabel Taylor courtyard; Schroeder asked if these fixtures could be modified to be more muted. Magre replied the loggia has a low ceiling and the lighting will drop down a little and be recessed there, with down-lighting, so it should not appear as bright. Schroeder remarked it would make sense to use a pavement scoring pattern with repeated horizontal bars on the rebuilt dining terrace, similar to granite paver bars shown in this project’s new courtyard paving and similar to design elements of the recently rebuilt Myron / Anabel Taylor courtyard. This would provide a unifying design element within all three plazas. Magre agreed. The applicants will consider granite benches for that area. Adopted Resolution for Lead Agency: On a motion by Randall, seconded by Lewis: WHEREAS: 6 NYCRR, Part 617, of the State Environmental Quality Review Law and Chapter 176.6 of the City Code, Environmental Quality Review, require a Lead Agency be established for conducting Environmental Review of projects, in accordance with local and state environmental law, and WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board has one pending application for Site Plan Review for renovations to Hughes Hall, located on the Cornell University campus, by Cornell University, applicant and owner, and WHEREAS: the applicant is proposing to renovate four levels of Hughes Hall in order to improve academic space use. Exterior and site modifications include: enclosing existing ground- floor loggia; a new entry from the courtyard; a new exterior stair tower on a west façade; and renovations to the gorge-facing dining terrace, including a new entrance and stair. The project includes removal and redesign of the courtyard area to include new paving, seating, lighting, walkway, bike racks, landscaping, and drainage improvements. The project is in the U-1 Zoning District, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 10 WHEREAS: this is a Type 1 Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”), §176-4 B(1)(h)[2], and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), §617.4(b)(11), and is subject to Environmental Review, and WHEREAS: State Law specifies that for actions governed by local environmental review the Lead Agency shall be that local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board does hereby declare itself Lead Agency for the Environmental Review for the action of site plan approval for the project. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None Public Hearing On a motion by Lewis, seconded by Elliott, and approved unanimously, Schroeder opened the Public Hearing. There being no public comments, on a motion by Elliott, seconded by Jones-Rounds, and approved unanimously, Schroeder closed the Public Hearing. B. Parking for Five Cars, 424 Dryden Road, Daniel R. Hirtler for William and Angie Chen. Declaration of Lead Agency. Public Hearing, Determination of Environmental Significance, & Recommendation to BZA. The property at 424 Dryden Road was subdivided in 2015 to form a new parcel at 319 Oak Avenue. The required off- street parking for 424 Dryden Road was formerly located on the part of the original parcel which was subdivided. The goal of this project is to provide the five required off- street parking spaces for the small site, while providing the best maneuverability and retaining a vegetative buffer at the rear of this parcel. The applicant is proposing two potential layouts. The preferred layout retains an existing mature tree, preserves a portion of the 10-foot vegetative buffer, but requires variances. The alternate plan is to construct a garage that occupies a larger portion of the 10-foot buffer and removes a mature tree, but does not require a variance. Both layouts include a trash enclosure. The applicant proposes to provide the five required off-street parking spaces for the small site, while providing the best maneuverability and retaining a vegetative buffer at the rear of this parcel. The layout retains an existing mature tree, preserves a portion of the 10-foot vegetative buffer, and requires variances as shown in drawings A2 and A5, more fully described below. The project is in the CR-2 Zoning District. This is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”) and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), and is subject to environmental review. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 11 Applicant Daniel R. Hirtler of Flatfield Designs presented a brief update of the proposed project. Public Hearing On a motion by Jones-Rounds, seconded by Randall, and approved unanimously, Schroeder opened the Public Hearing. There being no public comments, on a motion by Jones-Rounds, seconded by Elliott, and approved unanimously, Schroeder closed the Public Hearing. Adopted Resolution for City Environmental Quality Review: On a motion by Randall, seconded Darling: [J.G.S. Editorial Note: The following is the wrong resolution, taken from the February 24, 2015 Planning Board meeting, and is a CEQR resolution regarding a subdivision of 424 Dryden Road being considered at that meeting.] WHEREAS: an application has been submitted for review and approval by the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board for a Minor Subdivision of City of Ithaca Tax Parcel #64.-3-4, by Daniel Hirtler for owners, William and Angie Chen, and WHEREAS: the applicant proposes to subdivide the 0.251-acre (10,934 SF) parcel into two lots: Lot 1, measuring 0.156 acres (6,789 SF) with 64.5 feet of street frontage on Dryden Road and 105 feet of street frontage on Oneida Place, and containing an existing multiple dwelling; and Lot 2, measuring 0.095 acres (4,154 SF) with 71 feet of street frontage on Oak Avenue and 50 feet of street frontage on Oneida Place, on which the applicant intends to build a new two-family home. The property is in the CR-2 Zoning District which has the following minimum area requirements: 4,000 SF lot size for 1- or 2-family dwellings and 5,500 SF for other uses, 35% maximum lot coverage, 10-ft. front yard and 5-ft. side yard setbacks, and a rear yard setback of 20 feet or 20% of lot depth. The Zoning District also requires a minimum 35% green space. The proposed new dwelling is subject to Limited Site Plan Review. The applicant received an Area Variance from the Board of Zoning Appeals for an existing front yard deficiency, and WHEREAS: this is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance and the State Environmental Quality Review Act, both of which require environmental review, and WHEREAS: this is considered a Minor Subdivision in accordance with the City of Ithaca Code, Chapter 290, Article 1, §290-1, Minor Subdivision – Any subdivision of land resulting in creation of a maximum of one additional buildable lot, and WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board, being the local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, did on February 24, 2015 declare itself Lead Agency for the environmental review, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 12 WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Conservation Advisory Council and the Tompkins County Planning Department have been given the opportunity to comment on the proposed project and all comments received to date on the aforementioned have been considered, and WHEREAS: this Board, acting as Lead Agency in environmental review, did on February 24, 2015 review and accept as adequate: a Short Environmental Assessment Form (SEAF), Part 1, submitted by the applicant, and Part 2, prepared by Planning staff; a plat entitled “Minor Subdivision Map, No. 424 Dryden Road, City of Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York,” dated 1/14/15 and prepared by T.G. Miller, P.C.; and other application materials, and WHEREAS: the Planning and Development Board recognizes that information received and reviewed for this subdivision indicates the resultant parcels have received the required area variances for relief from the City of Ithaca Zoning Ordinance for properties located in the CR-2 Zoning District, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board determines the proposed subdivision will result in no significant impact on the environment and that a Negative Declaration for purposes of Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law be filed in accordance with the provisions of Part 617 of the State Environmental Quality Review Act. [J.G.S. Editorial Note: Following is the correct resolution from the February 23, 2016 meeting.] WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board has one pending application for Site Plan Approval for a 5-car parking area to be located at 424 Dryden Road by Daniel Hirtler for William and Angie Chen, and WHEREAS: the property at 424 Dryden Road was subdivided in 2015 to form a new parcel at 319 Oak Avenue. The required off-street parking for 424 Dryden Road was formerly located on the part of the original parcel which was subdivided. The applicant proposes to provide the five required off-street parking spaces for the small site, while providing the best maneuverability and retaining a vegetative buffer at the rear of this parcel. The layout retains an existing mature tree, preserves a portion of the 10-foot vegetative buffer, and requires variances as shown in drawings A2 and A5, more fully described below. The project is in the CR-2 Zoning District, and WHEREAS: this is an Unlisted Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance and the State Environmental Quality Review Act and is subject to environmental review, and WHEREAS: the Planning Board, being the local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, did on January 26, 2016 declare itself Lead Agency for the environmental review of this action, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 13 WHEREAS: this Board, acting as Lead Agency in Environmental Review, did on February 23, 2016 review and accept as adequate: a Short Environmental Assessment Form (SEAF), Part 1, submitted by the applicant, and Part 2, prepared by Planning staff; drawing titled “Site Alterations for Required Off-Street Parking and Required Landscaping – Option B (A2, A3 and A5),” dated 11/6/15, and prepared by Daniel R. Hirtler; and other application materials, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board determines the proposed Subdivision will result in no significant impact on the environment and that a Negative Declaration for purposes of Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law be filed in accordance with the provisions of Part 617 of the State Environmental Quality Review Act. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None The Board then agreed on a recommendation to the BZA, which is presented in the “6. Zoning Appeals” portion of these minutes. C. Hilton Canopy Hotel, 320-324 E. State Street, Scott Whitham for Neil Patel. Project Update, Conditions of Site Plan Approval, & Requested Changes. The project was approved on February 24, 2015. The applicant is requesting changes to the approved site plan, including the following: increase from 123 to 131 guest rooms; increase from 74,475 GFA to 77,884 GFA (due to the addition of a basement) and a slight change to the building footprint; minor landscape changes; size and location of windows and doors; and exterior materials and colors. Applicants Scott Whitham and Catherine De Almeida of Whitham Planning & Design, LLC; Frank Russo of spg3 Architects; and Neil Patel of Baywood Hotels, Inc. presented a brief project update, including an overview of the proposed changes since the last Planning Board meeting. Whitham noted that the building has received a granite base; the same granite edging now surrounds the Seneca Way entrance. He said the outdoor trellis system has been further developed, now with a rectilinear rather than a curved section. He noted there are now two separate site plan options: the original site plan plus a new site plan that includes a continuous pedestrian walkway between Seneca Way and E. State / M.L.K., Jr. Street. A planting palette has been developed as well, he concluded. Russo explained that the trellis system would be erected in two outdoor areas, offering spaces for hotel guests to retreat. These would include a system of columns and a galvanized steel trellis, with vines creating an overhead canopy. Russo noted there had been concerns about the limited size of the Seneca Way entry vestibule, so the adjacent Fire Command Room has now been scaled down to allow a DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 14 more generous entry area. (The applicants will meet with the City Fire Chief to obtain his approval for this alteration.) Russo then responded to the Board’s desire to allow general access to the second-floor rooftop terrace, as opposed to restricting certain portions thereof to adjacent guest rooms. He stressed that since the Building Code limits the deck to 49 people, there would never be too many people in that area. He said a portion of the deck would be open to the public and a portion open for all hotel guests at certain times of day. Whitham added that there is considerable transparency between the private rooms and the public terrace space here, so the new design will provide more of a buffer between the two, with only one entrance (and hence, no private guest room entrances). Jones-Rounds responded this makes a lot more sense. Schroeder observed that uplighting or other dramatic lighting on this terrace could provide extremely attractive nighttime views from E. State Street. Whitham agreed. Russo noted windows have now been incorporated into all the floors, so there will no longer be large blank areas. Russo said there had also been some concern with the formerly blank area on the upper west façade corner above the Contemporary Trends building. He said the project now includes two recessed panels there topped by small cornice elements providing three-dimensionality and shadow interest. In addition, the stone base will now run along the full perimeter of the building (more pronounced near the entrances). Schroeder asked if the brick mortar would be tinted as shown on the materials sheet. Russo replied, yes. Elliott recommended the applicants find a way of opening up the blank wall on the stairwell tower on the south façade (like what had been done so well on the east elevation). Russo replied that would be difficult, given that the building is right on the property line there. Elliott responded that even small windows would help. Schroeder suggested using small areas of fire-rated glass blocks, as was done with the Carey Building. Whitham replied the applicants could verify that would be acceptable with the City Director of Code Enforcement. Schroeder said it was important that the fiberboard portions of the façades actually look three-dimensional, with clear horizontal and vertical shadow lines at the joints. Without these, he said, these areas will look very flat. Russo replied that the individual fiberboard panels include lap joints, so there will indeed be joint shadow lines. Schroeder asked the applicant to provide details, for the record, illustrating this. He added that the façade’s windows should be recessed, providing clear surrounding reveals. Adopted Resolution Approving Project Modifications DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 15 On a motion by Darling, seconded by Elliott: WHEREAS: the project applicant is requesting materials and building façade changes for the proposed Hilton Canopy Hotel at 320-24 M.L.K., Jr./E. State Street, which was approved by the Planning Board on February 24, 2015, and WHEREAS: in accordance with §276-6 D., “Changes to approved site plan,” the Director of Planning and Development has reviewed the changes and determined the changes are significant enough to require re-opening the review, but are not significant enough to require a new Site Plan Review application, and WHEREAS: the changes consist of an increase from 74,475 GFA to 77,884 GFA (due to the addition of a basement) and a slight change to the building footprint, an increase from 123 to 131 guest rooms, minor landscape changes, size and location of windows and doors, and exterior materials and colors, and WHEREAS: the Board has on February 23, 2016 reviewed and accepted as adequate: revised and updated plans entitled “Proposed Site Plan – Option 1 (L100),” “Proposed Site Plan – Option 2 (L100),” and “Site Plan Details (L105),” all dated 12/3/15 and prepared by Whitham Planning/STREAM Collaborative, and “Cellar Floor Plan,” “First Floor Plan,” “Second Floor Plan,” “Guest Room Floors 3-7,” “Roof Plan,” “ Trellis Details,” “Wall Recess Details,” “North Elevation,” “East Elevation,” “South Elevation,” “West Elevation,” “Materials,” “View from East State Street,” and “View from Seneca Way (two sheets),” dated 2/23/16 and “Signage Details-1,” “Signage Details-2,” “Signage Details-3,” “Signage Details-4,”and “Signage Details-5,” dated 10/8/15, and all prepared by spg3 Architects; and other application materials, and WHEREAS: the Board, has on February 23, 2016, determined the proposed changes are consistent with the Negative Declaration of Environmental Significance filed on January 27, 2015 and therefore no further Environmental Review is required, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board agrees to the changes proposed by the applicant, subject to the following conditions: Conditions unique to revised proposal: i. The Planning Board strongly prefers the “Proposed Site Plan – Option 2” showing a continuous pedestrian walkway between Seneca Way and M.L.K., Jr. / E. State Street, and ii. Per verbal clarification at the February 23, 2016 meeting: 1) the approved fiber board cladding material has recessed horizontal and vertical edges that will provide corresponding shadow lines, and 2) façade windows will be recessed to provide clear surrounding reveals, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 16 iii. Applicant shall investigate adding small areas of fire-rated glass block (perhaps in horizontal stripes) to enliven the north end of the west façade, and Applicable Unsatisfied Conditions from the 2-24-15 Site Plan Approval: iv. Written approval from the City of Ithaca Fire Chief that the project meets all fire access needs, and v. Submission for approval by the Planning Board of project details including, but not limited to, signage, paving materials, exterior furnishings, and lighting (including any exterior ornamental lighting plan), and vi. Submission to the Planning Board of visual documentation that the penthouse enclosure walls are at the lowest height that will still provide effective screening for the mechanicals within, and vii. Submission to the Planning Board of a Landscape Plan keyed to a species list, and viii. Applicant to explore: (1) potential incorporation of decorative terra cotta salvaged during the demolition of the Strand Theater (which once stood on this site) into the low wall facing E. State Street or elsewhere on the site, and (2) potential re-creation, at some appropriate location on the building, of the prominent Strand stage-house mural (by artist David Finn) which formerly faced E. Seneca Street, and ix. Noise-producing construction shall take place only between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and x. Bike racks shall be installed prior to granting of Certificate of Occupancy, and xi. Applicant shall work with the Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) and appropriate City staff members to seek mutually-acceptable solutions that would improve loading and pedestrian access to CSMA (for example, via potential mutual cross-easements or a potential land swap between applicant and CSMA), and The following provisions discussed in the adopted FEAF, Part 3: xii. If drilled and / or driven steel piles are used in the foundation, then: (1) noise- producing installation work thereon shall be limited to the hours between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, and (2) ongoing seismic testing shall be conducted to make certain the pile driving or drilling operations do not in any way have a negative impact on any adjacent or nearby structure, and xiii. Applicant shall, as appropriate, employ the dust-control measures listed in the “Impact on Air” section of the FEAF, Part 3 during the project’s construction, and DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 17 xiv. All restaurant and hotel kitchen exhaust will be vented through the roof, and hotel laundry venting will be at ground-floor level, behind the existing concrete wall on the adjacent property, in an area not accessible to hotel guests or other pedestrians; any future exterior venting, not located in a screened location on the roof, that may cause noise, odor or street-level air flow shall be reviewed by Planning Division staff or the Planning Board, and xv. Exterior signage shall be of equal scale and quantity as the signage illustrated on the project renderings and elevations dated January 13, 2015, and xvi. Applicant shall actively pursue implementation of the mitigations (including proposed valet routes to and from the hotel) recommended in the Traffic Impact Study prepared by SRF and dated January 2015, though it is understood that providing a two-space loading area on Seneca Way and making signal-timing changes to two intersections will require the cooperation of governmental agencies, and xvii. Applicant shall work with the adjacent property owner on the east (CSMA) to potentially provide a cross-block pedestrian passage extending through applicant’s and the adjacent owner’s parcels. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None D. Brindley Street Bridge, Brindley Street at Cayuga Inlet, Addisu Gebre for the City of Ithaca. Lead Agency Concurrence for Board of Public Works. The current Brindley Street Bridge is a single-lane structure, constructed in 1938 with the last major rehabilitation occurring in 1952. It has been posted for a 20-ton weight limit since January 1965 with a condition rating of 3.859 and sufficiency rating of 62.5. The bridge is not historically eligible and carries gas/water lines, and vehicular/pedestrian traffic. Motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians using the structure use the same lane. There are no traffic signals, pedestrian-crossing signals, or stop signs to aid coordination of movement across the bridge. Crossing the bridge depends on opposing users indicating to each other when it is safe to cross. This is an unsafe condition and as usage of this road increases it will create a greater potential for head-on collisions or traffic queuing into the Brindley St./W. State St. intersection. Brindley Street and the adjoining Taber Street provide a second “local street” access to major shopping center situated approximately 0.6 miles south, in addition to serving businesses located along them. Project's main objectives are to: replace existing single-lane structure on Brindley Street with two-lane structure with accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians; restore crossing to condition which provides minimum 75-year design life, using cost effective techniques to minimize life- cycle cost of maintenance/repair; and implement measures that enhance safety and mobility consistent with improvements proposed for the W. Martin Luther King, Jr. / State Street. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 18 Nicholas announced that City Bridge Systems Engineer Addisu Gebre would not be available this evening to discuss the project with the Board. She said the project would appear on the March agenda, so the Board could discuss it with Gebre then. (Darling departed at 7:52 p.m.) Adopted Resolution Concurring With Board of Public Works Being Lead Agency: On a motion by Jones-Rounds, seconded by Randall: WHEREAS: State Law specifies that for actions governed by local environmental review, the Lead Agency shall be that local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, and WHEREAS: the Board of Public Works (BPW) has identified the Planning Board as an Involved Agency in the Environmental Review of the Brindley Street Bridge Project, and WHEREAS: the Board of Public Works (BPW) has notified the Planning Board of its intent to act as Lead Agency in the Environmental Review, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board does hereby consent to the BPW acting as Lead Agency for the Environmental Review for the Brindley Street Bridge Project. In Favor: Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock, Darling Vacancies: None (Darling returned at 7:53 p.m.) E. Ag Quad Renovations, Cornell Ag Quad Renovations, Cornell University Campus, Davies Orinda for Cornell University. Declaration of Lead Agency & Public Hearing. The applicant proposes to renovate the existing landscape and replace underground utilities in the Agricultural Quad. The project is needed to upgrade existing utilities and enhance accessibility, expand gathering spaces, and provide new lighting and site furnishings. Site work will include removal of all existing hardscape, as well as 14 trees, installation of new pedestrian paths, plazas, stone bench seating, lighting, and blue light phones, as well as new plantings with amended soil conditions. The project also includes a large bioretention area east of Kennedy Hall. The project is in the U-1 Zoning District. This is an Type I Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”), §176-4 B(1)(h)[4], and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), §617.4(b)(9), and is subject to Environmental Review. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 19 Applicants Gilbert Delgado, Andrew Magre and Davies Orinda of Cornell University presented a brief overview of the proposed project. Schroeder noted the illegibility (due to low image resolution) of the numerous labels on the “Scope of Utility Infrastructure Replacement” “Proposed Ag Quad Site Plan” drawing provided to the Board. Orinda replied that he would provide a higher-resolution version. Schroeder also said that the aesthetic success of this project depends largely on the character and quality of the various proposed paving materials, and emphasized that the Board would need to see samples of these. Adopted Resolution for Lead Agency: On a motion by Jones-Rounds, seconded by Randall: WHEREAS: 6 NYCRR, Part 617, of the State Environmental Quality Review Law and Chapter 176.6 of the City Code, Environmental Quality Review, require a Lead Agency be established for conducting Environmental Review of projects, in accordance with local and state environmental law, and WHEREAS: the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board has one pending application for Site Plan Review for landscape renovations to the Ag•••.••• Quad, located on the Cornell University campus, by Cornell University, applicant and owner, and WHEREAS: the applicant proposes to renovate the existing landscape and replace underground utilities in the Agricultural Quad. The project is needed to upgrade existing utilities and enhance accessibility, expand gathering spaces, and provide new lighting and site furnishings. Site work will include removal of all existing hardscape, as well as 14 trees, installation of new pedestrian paths, plazas, stone bench seating, lighting, and blue light phones, as well as new plantings with amended soil conditions. The project also includes a large bioretention area east of Kennedy Hall. The project is in the U-1 Zoning District, and WHEREAS: this is an a Type I Action under the City of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review Ordinance (“CEQRO”), §176-4 B(1)(h)[4], and the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), §617.4(b)(9), and is subject to Environmental Review•••.•••, and WHEREAS: State Law specifies that for actions governed by local environmental review the Lead Agency shall be that local agency which has primary responsibility for approving and funding or carrying out the action, now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board does hereby declare itself Lead Agency for the Environmental Review for the action of site plan approval for the project. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 20 In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None Public Hearing On a motion by Randall, seconded by Jones-Rounds, and approved unanimously, Schroeder opened the Public Hearing. There being no public comments, on a motion by Randall, seconded by Darling, and approved unanimously, Schroeder closed the Public Hearing. F. Maguire Automotive Project at Carpenter Business Park – Sketch Plan Applicants Tom Schickel of Schickel Architecture and Phil Maguire of the Maguire Family of Dealerships introduced the project to the Board, emphasizing the following points and highlights: • The City’s new Comprehensive Plan identifies this as an “Enterprise” area; applicants’ proposal would be consistent with this. • This site poses significant impediments that any developer would need to address (e.g., NYSEG substation, power lines, etc.) • No part of the site actually abuts the waterfront. • A substantial portion of the site would be reserved for water run-off management. • Primary site access would be from Third Street. • The entrance drive would include a display area and a parking lot shared with the Ithaca Farmers Market (with solar-charging station for electric vehicles). Schickel noted the applicants are considering the possibility of installing a sidewalk on Route 13, along the Department of Transportation right-of-way, plus landscaping and green space there. Schickel explained that the building would be raised above grade. He said the applicants are also considering a possible street-accessible publically-accessible coffee shop in one of the dealerships. He stressed the project would include considerable landscaping, green space, roof gardens and rainwater harvesting. Schroeder observed that the Comprehensive Plan recommends that Route 13 be considered for conversion to transformed into a boulevard — to function more like a real City street with sidewalks, bike lanes and street trees. It also recommends consideration of “the merits of adding a new intersection in the vicinity of Carpenter Business Park.” DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 21 So, Schroeder concluded, some of applicants’ proposals could help to realize Comprehensive Plan recommendations. Jones-Rounds said the character of the project’s signage would be very important. She would definitely want to see those details. She also encouraged the applicant to maximize the number and variety of uses on the site. Randall recommended the applicants situate the building closer to Route 13, to make it more of a genuinely urban mixed-use project. Schroeder strongly encouraged the applicants to include a regular row of street trees as part of their proposal, to help Route 13 begin to look and feel more like a normal City street, per the Comprehensive Plan. Maguire responded the applicants will pursue every opportunity for creating a sidewalk, as well as a traffic light. They would be amenable to bringing the building closer to the street, contingent on the addition of said traffic light. Elliott indicated that surface-sealing is an issue that arises more and more frequently. Given that the project will be so close to the water, he said, it will be difficult to control all the run-off. Maguire asked the Board to submit a written recommendation to the Planning and Development Committee in support of the project. Jones-Rounds added that any recommendation should also probably be sent to both the N.Y.S. Department of Transportation and the City Department of Public Works. G. Maplewood Apartments – Sketch Plan Applicants Scott Whitham and Cathy De Almeida Catherine DeAlmeida of Whitham Planning & Design, LLC and Siva Venkataramini of Torti Gallas & Partners Architects, Inc. introduced the project to the Board, noting most of the project will be in the Town of Ithaca. (Of the approximately 17 acres on the site, only about 0.75 acres are in the City.) Therefore, the Town of Ithaca will serve as Lead Agency. Venkataramini remarked that the current site plan is still very conceptual, but the intention would be reconnect the project site with the surrounding street grid and pedestrian paths. This will be an opportunity, he said, for introducing a mixture of building types (e.g., townhouses, 3-4 unit apartments). The project, he added, will include very pedestrian-oriented streets, with trees and sidewalks. There will also be at least one community center, he said, and the existing wooded knoll will be preserved and enhanced. 6. Zoning Appeals Appeal #3009 — 406 Stewart Avenue: Area Variances DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 22 Appeal of Jason Demarest, architect for 406 Stewart Avenue, LLC, the owner of 406 Stewart Avenue, for Area Variances from Section 325-8, Columns 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, and 14/15, Lot Area, Width at Street Front, Side Yard, Other Side Yard, and Rear Yard, requirements of the Zoning Ordinance. The applicant proposes to replace a three-story apartment building at 406 Stewart Avenue that was destroyed by a fire in 2015, by constructing a new apartment building at this location. However, to off-set the costs of replacing the old building with a new building meeting today’s Building Code requirements, the applicant proposes to increase the height and number of occupants in the new building. The proposal includes replicating, in part, the original building’s non-conforming footprint, adding a mezzanine level to the third floor, and increasing building occupancy from 6 persons to 11 persons. Because of these proposed modifications, the building cannot be replaced as-of-right, and requires several Area Variances. The property at 406 Stewart Avenue is deficient in width at street front and lot area. The lot has a street width of 35.5 feet and an area of 1,810 SF; required is a street width of 40 feet and a lot area of 3,000 SF. n addition, the proposed building’s footprint will continue to have deficient yards. The original building had a front yard setback of 0.8 feet. The proposed building will have a front yard setback of 5 feet; required is a 10-foot front yard setback. The original building had a side yard setback of 0.6 feet. The proposed building’s side yard setback is 3.1 feet; required is a 10-foot side yard setback. The original building’s other side yard setback was 0 feet. The proposed building’s other side yard is 1.8 feet; required is another side yard of 5 feet. Finally, the original building’s rear yard setback was 0.5 feet. The proposed building’s rear yard setback is 0.7 feet; required is a 10-foot rear yard setback. The property at 406 Stewart Avenue is located in the B-2d Zoning District where the proposed apartment building is a permitted use, however, Section 325-38 requires variances to be granted before a Building Permit can be issued. The proposed building is beautifully designed and appropriately detailed, and the Planning Board strongly recommends approval of this variance.   Appeal #3013 — 120 S. Aurora Street (Ithaca Marriott): Sign Variance   Appeal of Mathew Jalazo for Hotel Ithaca, LLC, owners of 120 S. Aurora Street, for a variance from Sign Ordinance, Section 272-6 B. (2), which allows a maximum of two wall signs per business in the commercial zoning district and limits the size of each sign to a maximum of 50 SF. Hotel Ithaca is currently constructing a multi-story Marriott Hotel at 120 S. Aurora Street at the east end of the Ithaca Commons. On November 4, 2014, Hotel Ithaca was granted Sign Variances from Section 272-6 B. (2), which provides that each business in a commercial district is limited to two building (wall) signs and that each sign cannot be larger than 50 SF in area. In 2014, Hotel Ithaca requested that the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) grant variances to erect six wall signs. The BZA approved four of the six signs. Two of the approved signs are directional signs on the west side of the hotel. The third approved sign advertises the hotel’s restaurant. The fourth approved sign included a combination address DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 23 and “name” sign, at the front entrance facing Aurora Street. At the hearing in 2014, the BZA denied Hotel Ithaca’s request to erect two additional “Marriott” name signs: one located on the 10th floor facing Aurora Street and another located at the penthouse level facing Green Street. The BZA did not grant variances for these signs, because the signs were significantly oversized. Hotel Ithaca’s current Zoning Appeal to the BZA requests approval for three additional signs for the hotel at 120 S. Aurora Street. Two of the proposed signs are wall signs depicting the “Marriott” name. These signs will be located on the exterior of the building at the third-floor level. One sign will face Aurora Street, while the other will face E. State Street (the Ithaca Commons). Each sign will measure 29.2 SF in area. The third proposed sign will be located on the exterior of the 10th-floor level and face E. Green Street. This proposed sign will be 76 SF in area, which exceeds the Sign Ordinance’s 50-SF maximum size threshold. Hotel Ithaca contends that the size and number of the requested signs are  appropriate,  because  of  the   hotel’s  massing and location. The property at 120 S. Aurora Street is in the CBD-140 Zoning District where wall signs are permitted; however, Section 272-18 requires the applicant receive variances for the number and size of the additional signs requested, before a Sign Permit can be issued. The Planning Board approves of the design of the third floor signs, provided that they are back-lit metal letters, including the larger “M,” and not internally illuminated (drawings submitted indicate they are not). The Board feels, however, that two third-floor signs in such close proximity to each other is excessive and it recommends only one sign be allowed.   Appeal #3015 — 305 Taylor Place: Special Permit   Appeal of Noah Demarest, STREAM Collaborative, architect for Douglas and Jyoti Shire, owners of 305 Taylor Place, for a Special Temporary Permit allowing the construction of a one-bedroom accessory apartment dwelling in an owner-occupied single-family home, as authorized under Zoning Ordinance, Section 325-10, “Accessory apartments.” The applicant proposes to construct a 906-SF accessory apartment in the basement level of the existing two-story 3,452-SF single-family home, located at 305 Taylor Place. The property at 305 Taylor Place is compliant with bulk, area, and setback regulations; and it has sufficient off-street parking for both the 4-bedroom single-family home and the proposed accessory apartment. The entrance to the accessory apartment will be at the back of the single-family home (east end). The property at 305 Taylor Place is in the R-1a Zoning District where the installation of an accessory apartment is an allowed accessory use. However, Section 325-10 requires the Board of Zoning Appeals grant a Special Temporary Permit for the accessory use prior to the issuance of a Building Permit. The Planning Board does not identify any planning issues and recommends approval of this appeal.   Appeal #3016 — 424 Dryden Road: Area Variances DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 24 Appeal of Daniel Hirtler, architect for Angie and William Chen, owners of 424 Dryden Road, for Area Variances from Zoning Ordinance, Section 325-20 F. (3) (a) [1], prohibiting off- street parking in a required rear yard, and Section 325-45.2 B. (11) (a), requiring a 10-foot wide vegetative border at the rear property line. After receiving an Area Variance for a deficient front yard setback from the Board of Zoning Appeals in 2015, the parcel at 424 Dryden Road was legally subdivided to create a second buildable lot, now addressed 319 Oak Avenue. Prior to this Subdivision, the off-street parking for the multiple dwelling at 424 Dryden Road was located on the west side of the property, close to Oak Avenue. However, the former off-street parking location for 424 Dryden Road became part of the 319 Oak Avenue parcel through Subdivision. Therefore, the owners must now locate these 5 required off-street parking spaces within the boundary lines of the new 424 Dryden Road parcel. While the applicant has created a Zoning-compliant design for 5 off-street parking spaces at 424 Dryden Road, the applicant does not believe this design is practicable. Therefore, he proposes a more functional alternative design, even though this design requires two Zoning Variances. Section 325-20 F. (3) (a) [1] prohibits parking in a required rear yard. The applicant’s alternative proposal allows two cars to be parked in the required rear yard. In addition, design requirements under Section 325-45.2 B. (11) (a) require a 10-foot wide vegetative barrier at the rear property line. The alternative parking proposal provides a 5-foot wide vegetative barrier. The property at 424 Dryden Road is in a CR-2 Zoning District where 424 Dryden Road is a legal non-conforming use, requiring 5 off-street parking spaces. However, Section 325-38 requires that variances be granted before a Building Permit can be issued for the alternative parking plan. The Planning Board prefers this alternative design that requires variances (and does not require the construction of a garage) and recommends approval of this appeal. 7. Old / New Business A. 2015 Planning Board Annual Report Nicholas briefly walked through a February 10, 2015 memorandum titled, “2015 Planning Board Annual Report – Site Plan Applications and Approved Projects.” 8. Reports A. Planning Board Chair No report. B. Director of Planning and Economic Development Cornish announced that Planning staff has begun the process of drafting the Collegetown and Downtown Ithaca Design Guidelines. DRAFT COPY – NOT YET APPROVED BY MEMBERS OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD 25 She said planning staff is also launching a study of the Ithaca waterfront area, as well as collaborating with a Cornell University class on completing the Southside Neighborhood Plan, both as part of Phase 2 of the City’s Comprehensive Plan. C. Board of Public Works Liaison Darling reported that the BPW received a retroactive request from Ruloff’s Restaurant for permission to install a bench, which the BPW is not inclined to grant. Darling noted the Cascadilla Creekway project is moving forward. He said the City identified some additional funding for the project, so it may be able to install a more desirable railing system. 9. Approval of Minutes On a motion by Schroeder, seconded by Darling, the revised draft December 22, 2015 meeting minutes as edited by Schroeder were approved, with no modifications. In Favor: Darling, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Randall, Schroeder Opposed: None Absent: Blalock Vacancies: None 10. Adjournment On a motion by Darling, seconded by Elliott, and unanimously approved, the meeting was adjourned at 9:56 p.m.