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All Newspaper Archive Articles Compiled.pdfUlysses water district bill surprises town board The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Apr 14, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 442 Document Text Journal Staff ULYSSES - Water in the recently completed Ulysses Water District #3 that serves residents and business along Route 96 from the Town of Ithaca to the hamlet of Jacksonville, will come at a higher price than expected. A $2.65 million no -interest state loan, which officials thought could be paid back during the next 30 years, will now have to be paid in 20 years, Supervisor Doug Austic told board members on Tuesday. He said the original offer was for 30 years, but two weeks ago they were only given the new option. Payments on the loan begin next year. He said he's not sure how much the payments will be per year, but the variable loans require increased amounts over the 20 -year period. The 367 users - residents and business within the district who will pay whether they hook up to the service or not - have already paid their first bill of $256. Austic said that money would be used to defray the cost of the first loan payment next year. Payments cannot exceed $650 a year. A $73 operation and maintenance fee will also be charged for the life of the system. Both the loan payments and maintenance fees could increase or decrease depending on the number of users on the system. Six people connected to the service last Thursday, the first day that water was available. About 65 plumbing permits - which cost $125 each - have been bought by residents in the district, according to town clerk Marsha Georgia. "We're assuming some lime over the next year or so people will hook up," Austic said. In other business, plans are already in place to replace sidewalks that were tom up and add some new sidewalk. The town received a $6,685 federal Transportation Enhancement Act for the 21 st Century grant. The town has to match the grant with $6,000, which can be a combination of cash and in-kind services, Austic said. The town has $9,000 in its capital reserve fund for the project. The project is estimated at $12,000 and should start within the next few weeks, using R. Myers Construction - the company that lay the pipes. The plan includes moving the bus stop in front of the Williams Insurance Agency, 1850 Trumansburg Road, to cut down on traffic problems. The proposed sidewalk would run between the Exxon gas station and the insurance agency. Sidewalk would also be placed on the other side of Jacksonville Road across from the gas station wrapping around the comer of Trumansburg Road and Jacksonville Road, Austic said. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com Loan repayment period shortened from 30 to 20 years Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. I of 2 1112/ 13 2:56 PM EwToRTAL ante Jacksonv It starts with a slu - h DSC that has failed a v • •Itt recent • th�sf�5e- :. ent of Eiiviroa= Yom" F mental Conservation ,has been alternately described as toothless, unaaringapd a political tool. The DEC's investigation of contaimnated wells-and underground fuel 'spills. in Jaclwnv7le adds inept to that list. 'The DEC's leadeiship role in Cornell University's Lake Source Cooling Project and other local environ- mental controversies can be endlessly debated and ana lyied. But there is no grayarea regaiding Jacksonville, whose residents have been tprmented by questions and 'concerns about Well pailOon since a•majorfuel spill '20-plus years-ago. This should be a chance fot the DECO inform and take.charge. Instead, top many.Jadwnvdle residents . . '!wx%left- n tile*& about 1beirhamlet's<gm+uon- ment. The DE's stiiigish approach and'irief6ectua•l- outreach were blasted at a Jacksonville Community Association meeting this week. When thatgrouppmeets .next month --- 7:15 p.m., Feb. 16; Jacksonville Commu- nity Church'— the DEC should be thele to listen, - i The -massive DEC might be an easy target, but:there are millions of New Yorkers who trust the agency to do the right thing; In recent years, concerns about environ- mental law enforcement in New York has been ques- tioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection A jesi3 - and some major watchdog groups... ' Allegations about the DEC's special treatment of some environmental lawbreakers has also promo: major investigation by the Assembly Committee.-ou Environmental Conservatticcoyyn,, focusing ori dWx-c-c en% permittin%Mt,�l7F� � and trnctu . one hss n ar'�oun surce 'Teddy Roosevelt was governor, but the agency is only arolgLA , , v *1 WeA runs-ihe garpufffom res€y,frahx<iaimmgtsiouswastes.Its r '..stated•responsibflit.i si ijde,'t. oncoumge.(public) par- tidipation iii enviroathiptal affairs." For.m,a y Jacl�6tr4lle•residents, concerns about -Vater water svpglies•and pontamination don't constitute an affair; but an outrage. While some have moved — eidw by mandate or choice.— others have remained, hoping forsolne sense of urgency and consistency from dii1JP_ What they've experienced is a cumbersome bureaucracy +hose job perfommnce has beau clearly _unacceptable, Ithaca Journal 2000 Ulysses closes on lot for water station The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Mosley, Kandea Date: Dec 7, 2002 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 330 Document Text Journal Staff ULYSSES - Plans to build a municipal water pumping station to serve Jacksonville residents moved forward this week with the Town of Ulysses' closure on a 8,225 -square -foot lot. Town Supervisor Doug Austic said officials are pushing ahead to secure financing for the $3.15 million water project. "We're in the process of getting a bond attorney, applying for the loan and putting it out to bid," Austic said. He said the goal is to have contractors break ground on the site sometime this spring. "The whole thing won't be operational until probably September," Austic said. The proposal to build the water station on Woolf Lane in the Town of Ithaca sparked protests from residents over the summer who feared the station would spur development, threaten property values and create too much noise. Some residents threatened to sue the Town of Ulysses. The dispute was settled in November after Woolf Lane residents agreed to sign off on 15 deed restrictions that stood in the way of the town's water project. The deed restrictions prevented the land from being used for anything other than residential use. "We decided to take an easier path and reach an agreement with them which we basically have," Austic said. Austic said the town agreed to have the pumping station designed to resemble a small house. "Then were going to landscape so you really can't see it, to make it unnoticeable," he said. The pumping station will eventually move water from the Bolton Point water treatment plant into the Hamlet of Jacksonville. Residents there have been trying to get a municipal water system since the 1980s following underground gas leaks that polluted a handful of wells in the late'70s. Town officials estimate the annual cost to residents to build Water District No. 3 will be $501 a year for 30 years. Austic said about 350 residents will receive water through pumping station. "But people building in that area will receive water, too," he said. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I of 2 11 /2/13 2:13 PM Ulysses closes on lot for water station -The Ithaca Journal: Are... http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/377878581 htm... Journal Staff ULYSSES - Plans to build a municipal water pumping station to serve Jacksonville residents moved forward this week with the Town of Ulysses' closure on a 8,225 -square -foot lot. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproducHon or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:13 PM Gasoline f6u,"n-d an Ja_cksonville wells By PHIUP LERMAN Journal writer JACKSONVILLE ---Gasoline leak- ing into d, a ground from the Mobil Gas Station on the corner of Jack- sonville Road and Route a6 has ap- parently seeped into the wells of three homes across the street, ac- cording to the homeowners and the Tompkins County Health Depart- ment. Tho home,�ers say they can "smell gasoline in the water from their kitchen faucets. John Andersson; director of en- vironmental health for theTorripltins County Health Department, said thk while there is gasoline in the water, there is no danger because the levels are ver ow v��ow entrations,there doesn'�seern to be health prob- lem," n ersson id. "But I would not adyj sane to drink it." He—said it seems very likely that the gasoline is seeping from .the Mobil Station, which is owned. by $o r W riglri. "I don'tthink there's any question it was the gas station. Not with three homes affected, all downhill from the gas station," Andersson said. Wright would noz comment aoout the situation. His lawyer, Trumansburg Attorney Martin Luster. said 'there is no le� Efig naw. 'Thi 'ere was a leakage problem; the problem has been stopped." He would not comment, however, on whether either Wright or Mobil Gil Co or the gas appearing in the water of the homesacross the street. 0. ., Jacqueline Luce of 607 Jack- sonville Road, said her family has been drinking bottled water and not washing dishes or cooking with 'the tap water, which has smelled of gasoline for the last three weeks. -Her attorney, Edward Abbott, said insist that they tak'eresponsibility for the situ- ation.. �r If we drill a new well, and the ground is saturated, who knows if that's also going to be filled with gas?" said Luce. "We'll just have to wait and see." Clemett Co., a Mattydsle contract- ing firm, has dug up a targe area in front of Wright's gas station. Work- ers have repaired three leaks. An- Ithaca Journal March 15, 1979 (?� dersson said. In addition, hesaid, the workers have dug a well and are pumping water out of --1 an at - tem raw gaspine c out of the ground near the three affected' homes. Andersson said there is no tray to tell yet whether or not that will solve the problem. The gasoline, he said, apparently, seeped through the soil. It is believed that the leak is from aline connect- ing u gas pump rD an un erground gas However, during the heavy rains last week, some gasoline was seen above ground near the gas station, and appeared to run'alona a storan sewer jin a e_th'ree homes accor -.ng..t"h prssnt_And some of a people -who live in the neighborhood. In addition to Luce, Andersson said the other two homeowners that have reported a problem are Dennis OLN.OL and William Hughes. The three homes are nex o eaL other on Jacksonville Read. The Mobil ail Corp. engineer who has been in Ithaca working on the problem could not be reached for comment. , Fresh water within sight for Jacksonville ByDOB1EBURTON JACKSONVILLE—For the first time in this, ham- let's history, a water district, giving these 135 houses fresh and unpolluted water, may become a reality. But, says Town of UIysses Supervisor Martin Luster, if action'by the residents isn't taken within the next. week; Jacksonville will lose its chance—for the time being anyway. Luster says that Jacksonville could very well be in the running for the competitive bidding -for money for a water district, funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. HUD re4uires that 51 percent of the district be low and moderate income. Because of more liberal current guidelines and the use If action is not taken in the next week, the chance may be lost for the proposed Jacksonville water district. of a survey instead of census information, Luster says Jacksonville has a good chance to compete for -the HUD funds. This past weekend about 135 surveys were hand carried to Jacksonville homes, asking for information that included income levels and house locations within the district. Luster says if enough people respond to the survey before the July 9 deadline and there is proof of the 51 percent low and.moderate income families, then they have until Augusi 1 to prepare a .'`massive grant proposal" that is'sent to HUD. Jacksonville does meet the health and community aspects for a water district approval. Luster stressed the importance of people responding to the survey. "Identification is not required, no one has to sign the form," he says. "But it is vital to get as many responses as possible mailed back by July 9." Luster says envelopes were furnished. continued on back page Water district At this time Luster says there aren't any formal boundaries 'for the water district, a rough sketch has been made for application purposes as: Route 96 from the Andra residence to Cold Spring Road; Jackson- ville Road from Kraft Road to Meked Road; Cold Spring Road from Route 96 to Podunk Road; and Swamp College Road to Halseyville Road. Residents have for some time known of the im- purities in their well water. Gasoline, nutrients, and other substances have polluted many residents' water supplies. Trumansburg Free Press July 3, 1984 By HELEN MUNDELL the new regulations, as now written, met laumai Staff -A new, state law requiring that would be prohibitive for small ser- vice station owners. Her organiza- petroleum storage tanks he tested tion recently conducted an informa- 1 periodically for leaks -has service station owners •worried and home- . tionaI meeting • about the . regu- lations. O ± owners with contaminated . wells cheerinYork's About 60 people attended, includ- New Legislature passed ag • eight .form Ithaca, and most of them were unhappy with the law, V the' law last year in the wake of she said. � numerous numerous gasolineleaks that have ed groundwater in many "We realize we'll have to go undercont' ' areas, including Tompkins County. some type of (testing) system, and some of the smaller businesses But about 20 Pint of the region's gasoline stations will close If will ; have to close their gas pumps," Savino said. "But we haven't, the -law -is enforced, said Roxana Savin; executive director. of the given up hope.. We're going to try to gef ServiceStation Operators Associa- tion some relief at the public hearings In ! the fall.„ j of Southern New York Inc.� That would be in addition to the 40 Putting In a new tank would cost. + percent of the county's' service sta. about •$70,000 under the new law, tions that closed between 1975 and 1883, mostly for economic reasons. ' compared with $36,000 to $40,000 under present regulations, she said. Regulations' for the storage tank 'Savin also . said that testing of >� law are being written and could take existing tanks would cost $400 to $700 ' effect early neat year. Those rules would affect municipalities; busi- Per tank, in addition to the .$13,000 cost of filling a gallon tank ■� tankssnesses and farms that have storage before it kali be tested, tested. "And then if they do' find some - Gasoline spills are a serious prob- thing wrong, obviously it would be a lem, having "a tendency to affect a lot. of people,” said John •Fieit tremendous shock to any business, be it large or small,' she added. - C regional. oil spill engineer with the Department Transportation But the I cost of a about $5 a spill also is high. It cases about a gallon to of in Syracuse. •' recover spilled gasoline; and much ne; LeTheThe federal Environmental pro-' Agency has said that one of it Is never recovered. The un- recovered gasoline can''cause' prob- up In nearby. , gallon of gasoline is enough to con- lens, such as turningl and making the water to taminate the water source of .a city unfit drink. Of 50,604 people, according to Arthur Wiese, spokesman for the American It has been estimated that there '+ Petroleum Institute. itegnlations in the state law's Ore= . are hbout 2 million under ound . storage . tanks in the country, and. ' ' lindnary draft provide that: •.Petroleum storage facilities that 75,000 to 100,000 of them are 1'ea•king, sAid , the petroleum I I holding more than 1,100 gallons be registered with the'state. * r recently to atts Wiese, while in Ithaca end a seminar at' • Tanks Cornell University. more thaii 10 years old be tested for Ieaks every five years,Wi said that 'about 7oo,000 of the tanks are associated + • Leaking tanks be replaced. with ail Mail ' 1 • New tanks and new installations meet strict new standards to sales a gasoline, and about half of those are owned by major oil com- son pre- vent leaks. Pardee. The other 1.3 million tanks awned ' The state expects to revise the regulations In September, In -farms are. by Other businesses, "r and governmental units, be E. comments from. the public.' It also to said. They, too, would be required to abide by the new regulations.' plans conduct • -public hearings in October on the Tompkins County has 10 or' 12' leaks regulations, which might then take effect early in 1885, ayear,most of them minor ,• ' accordipg to spill engineer Fietze. ®� Savin said the cost of abiding by ' And Tompkins County is one of the clean counties," he said. Fietze , Ithaca Journal Wednesday, August 89 1984 serves Onondaga, -Oswego, Wayne, Cayuga, Seneca and Cortland coun- ties, in addition to Tompkins. In 1980, his office investigated about 100 cases. Last year, it dealt with about 140, and this year he expects more than 200. Fietze said he is not sure why the number of cases has increased so rapidly, except that people are be- coming more aware.of the passible dangers. Increased awareness could lead to more reports. He also esti- mates there has been a 10 percent increase in the number, of tank failures because of the advancing age of most of the tanks. Fietze said the American Petrole- um Institute estimates a steel tank will last 15 years in this area, Without protection. In other areas, the estimate is 30 years. The Iife of a tank depends on the acidity of 'the soil, the water table, and other conditions, he said. One of the largest spills in Tompkins • County since 1980 oc- curred last year at Patterson's Ser- vice Station.at 221 N. Aurora St. in downtown Ithaca. About 1,360 gallons of gasoline leaked through a hole in a tank, Fietze said, The 'tank was removed and a recovery hole was put in, but not much gas was found. "Most of it•got away from us," Fietze said. "Either the ground soaked up a lot of it, •or it, moved out toward the lake." - Nicolay P. Timofeeff, professor of geography at the State University of New York at Binghamton, said the gasoline could reach Cayuga Lake.. But by the time it did, it should not ..be a—threat because the volume of water in the lake would dilute it below dangerous levels, he said. Timofeeff said he would be more concerned that the fumes from the gasoline would move into base- ments, where they could cause prob- lems. He warned any, residents whose basements do contain gas fumes not to ,insert a fan in the basement to .blow the air out. Instead, fans should be placed outside the base-. meet, ' to blow fresh air .inside. It j Recent county. spills The size and effect of oil and gas spills can vary widely. These are among the recent incidents recorded in Tompkins County: • 1984: In Jacksonville, -a sub- mersible pump in a frame well leaked, contaminating the well. In South Lansing, in a case still under .investigation; gasoline, ap- parently from.'an abandoned gas station across from Rogues Har- bor Inn, has. contaminated one Well and possibly another.- - 1983; At 581 Warren Road, home heating oil from an under- ground tank contaminated a well on the property, which is owned by Cornell'University. • 1982: A fuel oil- tank at a private home started leaking and contaminated the family's well. The Dryden Busy Hee lost a few hundred gallons of gasoline through a hole in a pipe. In Newfield, .a bulldozer hit a - Mobil pipeline. Between 12,000 and 20,000 gallons of gasoline leaked out and were lost. About 8,000 gallons were recovered. • 1981: The Texaco station at the corner of Seneca and North Meadow streets in Ithaca lost about 1,200 gallons of gasoline through a hole.' Most of the gasoline was - recaptured in a recovery well on the property. An above -ground home heating oil tank in Groton leaked. into a family's basement. 1980: The Groton Busy Bee lost, about 3,50.0 'gallons of gasoline through a hole in a tank. Most of the gasoline was -re, covered from a nearby stream and from a recovery well. At Agway in Ithaca, an above- ground tank overflowed while it was being.refilled. One of the most troublesome leaks occurred about 1978 in Dryden, where, the Southworth Library was closed for months because gasoline fumes made the building uninhabitable. might take several weeks to several months to get rid of the gasoline fumes, he said. According to Timofeeff, when gasoline escapes it separates into-. three parts: One part becomes va- por, which can travel along pipes into basements. The vapor also can move uphill through soil, making it difficult to track, he said. It is both toxic and explosive. Another part remains a liquid, and stays fairly close to the spill area, he said. The third part dissolves in water. This part contains benzines, toluenes and xylenes, as well as some hydrocarbons, which dissolve in the grqurnd water and move in solution within the ground water. The dissolved material Is the most troublesome, Timofeef said. It can move freely and travel long dis- tances, depending on the particular characteristics of ground water in that location. Benzines are known to cause cancer and are highly toxic, he said, but can be removed from water by activated carbon filters. (r\ • • • ami. ies* sue ove r ta. ted W ''e. 1- -1 S' By..H ELEN MUNDELL Which owned the underground tanks, butMobil eVidew. - Journal Staff ly could not find a leak. Two Jacksonville families are suing Mobil Oil Corp. Aftbr about six months,'gasoline started ghowing u�• for $125,000 each, claiming that gasoline from a nearby nearby wells; Luce. said, and Mobil dug up the tacks: Mobil service station has contaminated their wells. and piping and discovered, some leaks in the pipes. William and Esther Hughes and Clayton and Jac- Luce said that about flour yeho earlier; gasoline ba • quellneappeared in the cellar- drains of some -houses near the February. Luce of Jacksonville filed separate 'suits in, station. "It was so strong we.had to leave the windowi February. 'Z'he cases are scheduled to be .heard in open,!' " he said. "We Were afraid of " September in Tompkins County Supreme Court. p explosions. Luce` Yn addition, Danby well -driller C. Fpger Howell ifs said. that,gaspline seeped'into the well owned by John; Kraft, a neighbor, and Mobil paid for a new well. suing the families .for $5, apiece fon the cast When gasoline fmt appeared in the Luce arid Hughes` drilling two new: walls, which. which- also have becomea wells the contaminated. Howell also is suing 'the' oll company. . y met with engineers from the stats Depart meat of T tansgortatign and Mobil .dTficialsi. Luon said; Mobil has refused to pay the .bilis for the new.weils Mobil • agreed 'to drill new wells, anq meanvihlle buye but agreed to install oil filters, a project slated to.start bgttl' 'd yPater tor.people with contaminated -wells.: • nett -week. i�ut after Howell gilled the tta�w wells* Mgbflnaed The families have, been drinking bottled .Water for to pay for .thein-, ssiylnd'HowellIs• bRLs-iiiere tbb- : ► nearly five years, Clayton Luce said their propleMs* Luce -said. ; began in 1979, when there was a gas leak at the ften Mobil started, ppplying the Luces Wiih bottled; Jacksonville Mobil station on Route 96. water 4% yearn ago, the company asked the bomer Luce said-s�tationrovvner Roger Wright notified •Mobil, Turn td WELLSp Page H Ithaca Journal Wednesday, August 8; 1984 Wells — Continued from Page 1 owners to sign.a paper saying it was not responsible for the contamina- Uon of -the wells even -though it was supplying water; Luce said, but they consulted their attorney and refused to sign. "If we'd signed it, they'd have been off the hook," he said. Dennis:O'NeA of Route 96 said his family also. has been drinking bot- tled_ watOJor 4�„years. O'Neil said the amount of gapolIne in .their well varies: "At tines it smells," he said. The family hesitates even to wash vege- tables, brush their .teeth or, take a bath in their well water, because of the additive benzine in the gasoline. Benzine is known tocause cancer and also.:is toxic, according to John Andersson, Tompkins County's di- rector of, environmental health, who confirmed that benzine was present In the wells, Luce • said that Wright recently bought the tanks In the ground from .Mobil and then sold the station.and- the tanks. The new owner leased the station to Steve Baker, who opened a Chevron station there, Luce said. . "We ere quite concerned, be- cause ause there's still gasoline do the ground.and-in -the test holes" drilled by Mobil, Luce said: "We were worried that if' he was losing gas, we'd never know it be- cause the ground i$ still full of IL" Luce claimed that.Mobil has been "dragging' Its' feet for along time'' about solving..the problem. In the last'tive years, he;:said,•.Mobil has sent three different:sets of'erigineers to Jacksonville 'ta::study :the :prob- lem. The* engineers "get to a certain point," and; then Mobil transfers them elsewhere, Luce said. Then the company sends in more engineers to - study the problem again, he said. Luce complained that nothing has been done to find a permanent solu- tion to the water problem during the last five years. The health department's An- dersson' Mid tie 'agrhes that five years is "way tQo long" • for • the problem to remain unsolved, but Bald they have been working to find a• solution. - . Pari of the problem is that author- ity has been switched from the state Department Qf Enviionmeetal Con -- servation. (DEC) to the Department of Transportation (DOT),. he said. The health department could not do anything because the contaminated wells were privately owned. "We don't have a code dealing with private wells," Andersson said. "We don't have anything firm that we can go to Mobil and say, 'Do komething. Andersson also said -the lawsuits are slowing the search for a solution because Mobil is reluctant to do anything with a suit in process. John Fietze, oil spill engineer with the DOT, said the iack of resolution is paflly because the gasoline comes and goes. He wrote It letter to Mobil. telling- the -company it had until June 22 to install activated carbon filters on the contaminated wells, or else. the DOT would have- the work done and bill Mobil. Fietze said recently. that although Mobil hadn't met -the deadline; the. eonppany had hired consultants who have tested the water and designed a new filter, which. his office has approved.. • . Mobil told the 'familles It will begin Installation of .the filters next week, Jacqueline Luce said Tues- day. The Lucas' attorney, Edward Ab- bott, said he discussed the problem recently with Mobil's consultant and was told it'would be late fall or early winter'before the project is com- pleted. In the meantime; he said, the suits are scheduled to be heard In Septem- ber in Supreme Court in Tompkins ,County.* "Whether -& ' not we go ahead and try it depends on.how.far along they . are with fixing up the. wells," he said. Mobil official Gail Jamin denied that -the oil company has been drag= -ging, its feet. She said the company has been taking various steps • to solve the problem, and installing the filters is "a final step." But Andersson said the filters are not a final solution. "No one Is sure how well. they will work," and it is difficult to tell when the carbon. needs to be replaced, he said. , Other wells could also become contaminated, Andersson said. ' ITHACA joURNAL Wednesday, Aug• ti, 1984 Xville discusses water ditrisct By GERI SPEICFI ULYSSES—A public hearing was 71d in the Ulysses Town Hall on Uc- oer 9 for the purpose of discussing a proposal for the creation of a water dis- trict in the Jacksonville area. At the re- quest ofAhe Town Board, a represen- tative of Laberge Engineering, Clyde Robbins, attended. About a dozen in- terested residents also .were in atten- dance. Mr. Robbins explained the processes involved in ascertaining w-hether the establishment of such a water district would be beneficial and outlined the kinds of grants available. Grants from Housing . and. Urban Development (HUD) are not as easily obtained as those from the Farmers' Home Admini- stration (FHA) Grant program, accord- ing to Mr. Robbins. Although HUD grants may fund 100 percent of a pro- ject, and FHA grants fund only 75 per- cent, Robbins recommended ap- plications be made to FHA. "FHA is a sure thing if you're qualified. It's not a crap shoot like HUD." Several requirements must be met be- fore any application for a grant is made. A survey of income levels in the pro- posed water district area must be made. A previous survey taken last summer proved the area exceeded financial guidelines. The district can be redesign- ed in order to make sure that the median income falls within allowable limits, thus including pockets . of low and moderate income. The median income is not arrived at through averaging. Rather it is the income precisely in the middle of the homes surveyed. A second requirement is that a water district be formed. In order to do that, a continued an page 3 Trumansburg Free Press October 17, 1984 Ecom Pa9a .t Xville water- map ader reap must be drawn by a registered eng neer that describes the boundaries of th water district. A short report must the be submitted- which would outline it tentions for the district and how it woul be capitalized, which means how the re maining fees would be raised. The costs for formation of the distric and pre -application surveys and report. would be approximately $7,500. Ulysse: Representative to the County Board .Tames Mason, was present to assure the Town Board and residents that the County is aware of the costs involved ir, establishing a water district. The county plans to set aside money which could fund 75 percent of such a feasibility study. He said, "These funds can be ap- plied to assist UIysses in getting off the ground." Questions were raised as to.the soutce Of supply for the water. Robbins said, "Your own system is very costly. De- signing a water treatment system means You are into big bucks." He suggested extending existing. water dines to serve the 130 or so homes. That then opens then opens the area for further develop- ment while taking 'are of current needs. The need for a water district is deter- mined by the condition of the area. The Jacksonville area has problems with fer- tilizer infiltration and gas in the sub- strata of rocks, as well as overall poor quality of water supplies. An FHA•sur- vey would question ,water supplies in terms of quantity, quality, taste, odor, hardness and pressure. Residents at the meeting seemed to agree that the need was already estab- Iished. They said, "You have to start somewhere. Let's take the bull by the horns" and establish the water district. Town' Supervisor. Martin Lusrcr said that Mr. Robbins -had "given the board food for thought," and that a pian of action was needed. This might include a - new survey, intermunicipal negotiations for extension of water lines and forma- tion of the water district. Such a plan would probably take. a minimum of three months to complete once it was started. Funding of Xville water district topic at meeting By GERI SPEICH ULYSSES ---The Ulysses Town Board accepted the contract for preliminary work to set up the Jackson- ville Water District at their regular meeting on February 12. Hunt Engineers, Inc., of Painted Post will receive $2,250 to perform several services con- nected with the establishment of water supply for the Jacksonville area. Services to be included are a field review, preparation of maps, and an engineering report. These will be based on an economic analysis of the area. The company will also inform the Jacksonville residents through attendance at hearings that will be held by the town board, probably in the Jacksonville area. Hunt will submit forms_ maps, and applications to ap- propriate agencies for funds to establish a municipal water supply system. The fee for the application to HUD is included in these services. The board will check into funding options for the district. Trumansburg Supervisor Martin Luster asked the town attorney to prepare a repor< for the next meeting of the town board. "There appears to be a great deal of flexibility in how to fund," Luster said. Local law allows the board to require a referendum vote from those paying for a project such as this. That will provide a means to educate the,public as well as to let the taxpayers decide,the issue, according to Luster.. Several town board members spoke in favor of exer- cising that option. Additionally, a Citizens' Advisory Committee is to mm Page I : `-. Ulysses board hearing was set for March 10 at 7 p.m„ before the regular town board meeting. David Zimet, Town Zoning Officer, reported that yet another request is to be sent to the planning board for review. He has received a request from WiIIiam Holtkamp of the Cayuga Inn to remodel and open eight guest rooms with private baths at his establishment. Two town residents addressed the board. William Rappel brought a concern from South Street concer- ning a slope that should be stabilized. "The creek is cutting into the side of the bank causing slumpage," he said. Highway Superintendent Meeker will report the problem to the County Highway Department since that part of the road affected is a county road. be' formed. Luster says that group now has a task. In order to apply for a limited grant from the Tompkins County Planning Department, a supporting :petition signed by at least 25 residents is needed. This is a non- binding petition whose only purpose is to show sup- port for a study of the project. The Jacksonville area has been plagued by problems with well water con- tamination from bacteria, nitrates, and gasoline seepage. Another piece of old business continues to need resolution.. Richard Parker's application for a development district on Perry City Road has been held up because the town has been checking into sub- division regulation and because of concerns discussed at a public hearing on the application. Tom Reitz is chairing a committee on subdivision regulations for the planning board and is. putting together some in- formation for review. The planning board is the governing agency for the Town of Ulysses in terms of subdivision regulation. According to Reitz, "The major concern of the people at the hearing was water." Engineering reports state that existing wells are located upstream and that much of the water is recycled anyway -as ground water. The effect of new wells upon ground water supplies cannot be judged, however. - The planning board will set a hearing date on Parker's request. Another development district continued on page 24 Richard Parker's application for a development district on Perry City Road ha's been held up because of concerns of residents of the Town of Ulysses. Tom ' Reitz is chairing a committee for its review. Tom Retiz, representing the Boy Scouts, asked for a proclamation naming February 1985 as Boy Scout Diamond Jubilee Month. All residents are encouraged to take pride in the community benefits accruing from the work of our local Boy Scouts. A- major camporee is planned for mid-May at the fairgrounds and will be at- tended by approximately 1,000 Scouts. Local Law #1 was adopted. This law raises dog licensing fees. According to Supervisor Luster, "The purpose is to increase fees to make up for the deficit imposed by the SPCA contract." That contract called for significant increases in the cost of their services that would not be otherwise absorbed through the 1985 town budget, Trumansburg Free Press February 20, 1983 Meeting on Jacksonville water district Monday By FRED YAHN P.M. in the Ulysses town hall, a Journal St8ff representative from' Hunt Engi- JACKSONVILLE — A public information meeting on the pro- neering of Painted Post, which is ' doing the preliminary research on posed Jacksonville water district is the water district, will speak on the scheduled for 7:30 P.M. Monday in proposal. the Jacksonville' Community Tentative plans call for an April Church, on Route 96. The town 9 public hearing on the water dis- board is proposing a water district trict and an April 23 public referee- which would include some 100 to dum. Luster said the project could 135 residences in the Jacksonville cost as much as 51.2 million, with area; the district would be*adminis- half of that money pos$ibly coming tered by the Ulysses town board. from a federal Small Cities Grant, Such a water district is needed, and the other half being bonded lo - according to Ulysses supervisor cally. Martin Luster, because of the water Luster said the town board is pollution in the area which has considering three possibilities for been verified by the county health ' the water system: A connection to department. The proposal for the the Village of Trumansburg water water district does not include sew- supply, a connections to the town crake: Presently, most of the homes of Ithaca and its Bolton Point sys- in the area have drilled wells andtem, or the creation of its own sys- their own septic systems. . On' Tuesday, March 26, at 7:30 tem for Jacksonville, with a water source near Willow Creek Point. - Luster emphasized .that all plans Ithaca Journal. (?) March 14, 198 and proposals are tentative, and that residents would have to ap- prove of such a system in a referen- dum. — JmQle waterrefer en.�dnm a�; HUD aid sought 9y QERI SPEICFI`t i' ! ; ; ULYSSES—Once again 10 on -the agenda for the town board was the praposa dot' the formation of a water district in Jacksonville. The board has drawn up a timetable that would enable thew to'meet an April 29 filing date with Housing•and ,Irban Development (HUD). -Included in these plans is 8 town referendum to be held ogApri123. Several workshop sessions and a formal public hearing will be held prior to the vote. Town Supervisor Luster agreed that it appeared. to ' be a `.'real tight' schedule" but feels it is imperative to follow • the paoper steps in filing for the HOD grant this year as the funding may not be available next year. Luster testified before Congressman Matt McHugh's congressional bearing on the federal budget in an at- tempt to keep such projects from being eliminated or substantially reduced in, that budget. Speaking of the ambitious scope of the project, Luster said, "We want to make the process as open and educational as possible. *1 want as many questions answered -as possible." Collection of the necessary data for the grant application, as well as the cost analysis and mapping, will be done by March 26. A workshop session is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. that night in the town hall. The. -formal public hearing will be held on April 9 -at a time and place to be announced. The referendum on April 23 will decide whether or not the HUD application will be filed. If the project were to be voted down at that point, then the whole process would be stopped. A referendum is called for. under existing town law since the maximum allowable amount granted by HUD is somewhere between $40000 and $600,000 depending on whether the ap- phtAfibii "falls under a single -purpose or comprehen- sive category. That amount falls short of the probable total cost of $1.2 milhon:' on g woBe necessary to.rmtse the ad UonM funds.- Town un s:Town law permits a -town to supply water as a town function. This means that the water district would be controlled by the town board and not be set up as a water -district to be governed by a separate board of commissioners. Luster feels that this affords greater flexibility- and would be less Aostly and less cuinbersome tommanage. The town wili'56ve to lo6k to 'town taxpayers to -bear some of 'the costs -involved in establishing -the water supply. The town is in the process of setting up a system whereby the residents of the water district would pay a more substantial portion of the costs yet also help to spread some of the costs town -wide. The Village of Trumanstturg would be exempt. Luster said; "We need something that is -fair and makes sense to everyone." He further said, "One of The reasons we are -going through this process is to see if it's feasible." The water district has tentative lines that will be sub- ject to change through the hearing process. Boundaries new set up would include up to 135 residences in the Jacksonville area. The need fora new water supply is based upon the contamination and pollution of the ground water supply from gasoline, nitrates and bacterial substances, An engineering firm from p6o ter! Pott, Hunt Engineers, has been hired to help the town with the - feasibility study, application and for- tpa�tion process for such a..p unioipal water system as would benecessary. In otlie3l business, the Pft hoard heard a repev froom Judge .Riceori the Annual Meeti#1 C e :Associating—.0i towns t6t,.#tet a�niJed ns � t%ve� ;tic tti,;the adacxc# ce `i ar' �� ancf'' • :�� ds . aassediie necsary . eicaminatio .covering new laws. Tom Reitz spoke for the Ulysses Planning Board. The town board has asked for sub-dWision regula#ons. Tentative guidelines are in place, and final plans should be ready by July. The toren resolved to institute, ,a -fee schedule on $25 for each application for subdivision approved involving five or fewer lots, and $50 for each such application involving more than five lots. The planning board must advertise and hold public hearings on each such an application. The planning board will take action on the Parker Development application for Perry City Road on Mar- ch 20. Concerns regarding increased traffic and drainage and water supplies have been .brought to the public hearings by concerned residents of the area. . The need for a new water supply is based upon the contamination and pollution of the ground water supply from gasoline, nitrates and bacterial substances." An application for a development district at 666 Waterburg Road by Purlie Careen was approved. This approval was for replacement of an existing mobile home that is used as his principal residence. -A hearing date was. set for April 2 on the application, for a development district for Cayuga Inn. Richard Backer resigned from the planning .board. The town- board would like to hear from interested people who might have a desire to fill that vacancy. - Applications should be filed by April 9vdth the town, - Town Zoning Officer David Zimet presented Trumansburg Free Press March 20, 1985 proposaIs for amendments to the zoning. ordinance. They were referred to the planning board. The amen- dments deal with several areas that have; been of Wn- cern, such as planned development districts, New York .State fire codes and dish-antennae:r4wations. He also commented on the incredible amount of new building inquiries. Restriction of the town's copy machine to official business has already resulted in a savings. The' new . service contract shows a decrease from $789 to $476. Bonding rates for jlville water To the Editor, I feel a strong responsibility as a concerned Town of Ulysses resident, and as president of the Jacksonville Community .Association, to provide available infor- mation to all our area re3idents regarding the proposed Jacksonville District. At the special Board meeting on Tuesday, March '26, Hunt Engineers and Ulysses Board members Presented cost estimates for the water line. Total amount decided to be voted on will be a maximum of $1,100,000. All Taxable property owners in the Town of Ulysses except residents in the Village of Truman - burg are eligible to vote. The proposed method of ap- portioning the cost has notyetbeen decided. Three methods were discussed all contingent on ap- proval of the HUD grant and whether the water source is to be the Village of Trumansburg. If Bond rates remain as predicted, then the approximate cost per thousand of assessed value as proposed will be: 1. 80010 Townwide residents $1.30 20% Water Distriict residents $2,20 2. 50010 Townwide residents $.75- 50%.. Water District residents $7.50 3. 20% Townwide residents $ AO 80% Water District residents $12,00 This is only the proposed cost for bonding over the next 40 years; not including hook-up from main to house, cost of water and other unknown charges. The district boundaries were defined at the special Town Board meeting with some properties being with- drawn: It was unfortunate that all property owners in the proposed district, or those immediately outside, were not informed of the opportunity to. withdraw or join the area. Since time constraints are very critical on the HUD application which is due' on or by April 29, I will post proposed water district maps in Jacksonville. They are also available for viewing in the Town Office. I urge all residents to attend the Public Hearing on April 9, at 7:00 p.m. in the Trumansburg High School auditorium. Questions and concerns can be directed to me at 387-9236, or members of the Town Board. —Thomas Reitz, Trumansburg, N. Y. 14886 Trumansburg Free Press April 3, 1985 Xville draws- the line. for new water district By GERI SPEICH ULYSSES—The Jacksonville water district has now been defined and mapped out. According to Town Supervisor Martin Luster, a large-scale detailed map of the area shows all the properties to be included and is posted at the town clerk's office. He encourages all 'the property owners in the town of Ulysses to take ad- vantage of the opportunity to review it. A list of the parcels of land that are included in the boundaries of the proposed wats c district is also available. As outlined, the Jacksonville water district will ex- tend from Route 96 down Halseyville. Road to. Cold Springs Road. The boundary winds around to Colegrove Road near the town barns and will ekknd on Jacksonville Road as far as Mekeel Road. From there it extends to Swamp College Road and back around towards the Trumansburg area. 'Ap- proximately 160 parcels of land would be covered by the district. Luster cautions that the entire project is contingent upon -funding from a HUD grant. Application for a $400,000 grant must be made by April 29 and such funds would help to absorb some of the costs involved. ;y. From four options available'in terms of providing a water source, the town board has selected the plan that 'appears to be the most economically feasible. A public hearing on the'proposals for allocating the costa of that plan will be held April 9. A public hearing on the proposals for apportioning the costs for the water district will be held at 7 p.m. in the Trumansburg High School auditorium, on April 9. Several alternatives will be proposed for discussion at that hearing. Luster said, "We are most desirous to hear the' thoughts of property owners in order to decide on the alternative to adopt." He added that anyone desiring to speak at the hearing will be heard. The town board must decide on which plan to adopt at continued on baLn page The Trumansburg Free Press April 3, 1985 fou. -� k- Water district its regular meeting which will follow the hearing. The referendum on the water district will be voted -on April 23. Luster .further explained that this entire process is important to all of the town property owners since they will be asked to pay for parts of the costs incurred in the establishment of a municipal water supply for the Jacksonville area. Those residents living within the water district will be expected to pay more than those outside the district, however. The total anticipated cost for the project is $990,625. Luster said that a maximum cost of $1,140,000 has been established. That would make it easier to add on to the total district, if it should be necessary, without having to go through the entire process again. From four options available in terms of providing a water source, the town board has selected the plan that appears to be most economically feasible. The etten- A large-scale detailed map of the Jacksonville water district is currenit), on display at the Ulysses town clerk's office. In addition to the documen- tation and maps available at the town hall, copies are available the Jackson ville Community Church, sion of water service using the Village of Trumansburg as a primary source would be the least costly option to exercise. The town and village boards will hold a joint meeting on the proposal on April 1. Other options 'in- vestigated included using Ithaca as a source, at a projected cost of 51,437,470, and establishing a lake facility near Willow Creek at an estimated cost of 51,705,972. - According to Luster, the establishment of a water supply for the Jacksonville area will, actually benefit the Town of Ulysses as a whole. The town referendum on April 23 is based on the thought that those outside the boundaries of the water district will benefit from its establishment in several ways. He said, "It is our thought that those outside the district receive benefits. It increases economic activity by assuring light manufacturers and retailers of a reliable water source and that benefits the: town as a whole. It increases the value of homes in the district and..that benefits the town as a whole by increasing the total assessed valuation of the town. It is also a foot in the door for later expansion of municipal water to other areas," Jacksonville water distric# nixed BY:FRED YAHN Jauine/Steff TRUMANSBURG _ The 124 residences in the Jacksonville area' will not be getting their own water district--at.Jeast not for now. Saturday morning, the Ulysses town board reversed its decision of last Tuesday.night and -canceled an April 29 referendum to authorize a water district. Town Supervisor. Martin Luster Proposed .thiat the town board cancel the referendum, saying that a 20 -RD cost-sharing pian would be too much for residents of the pro- posed district to bear, . 'After a brief, discussion, the board •y.4ted 5=0'to rescind its Tues- day night resolution,* which sup- ported creation of the district and • authorized the referendum. ' "I received a lot of phone calls after. the Tuesday night meeting, and tttbst 'of them were froth resi- dents who said ' they just couldn't pay fora water district," Luster said. "I could see a 50-50 cost -shay= ing split, but at this date, it's too late to propose another• referendum to meet the HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) filing. deadline of April 30," he said. >~ Creation of the new district was contingent upon the district's re- ceiving a 5400,000 HUD Small Cit- ies grant. Total cost of -the district had been projected at $990,625.. Under a 20-80 cost-sharing plan, people residing within the -proposed district would have had to pay 80 Percent of the town's 5590,625 share of the cost. Residentt outside the district (non-residents of the vil- lage of Trumansburg) would have had to pay 20 percent of the dis- trict's cost. Residents outside the district (non-residents of the village of Trumansburg) would have had to pay 20 percent of the district's cost. According to Luster, the 20- 80 plan would have meant that a homeowner with a $50,000 home, living in the district, would have had io pay 5672 a year for the dis- trict. "1 cannot see this kind of hard- Ithaca Journal April 5, 1985 ship .on residents," said Luster, who had originally proposed cre- ation of the district more than a .Year ago. Since then, the xown had sought engineering studies from Hunt Engineers of -Painted Post, which said the most feasible -meth- od for creating a water district would be to seek water from the Trumansburg municipal system. Trumansburg. gets its water from Cayuga Lake. The proposed Jacksonville water district would have run southeast- erly from the south Trumansburg boundary, for about two miles, roughly running along Jacksonville Road, Cold Springs Road ' and Route 96. Accordir* g to Luster, ' about 55 residences in ihe- proposed district have water pollution problems in their wells: About five of these wells were polluted by a gasoline service station tank leakage. The remainder of the wells' have nitrate and bacteriological pollut- Turn to WATER, Page 5 New options must be sought for Jackson ville water - How do the Town of Ulysses res- idents spell relief? RESCIND. Af;, ter overwhelming opposition by property owners both inside and outside the water district that was .proposed by the Town Board, the motion was passed to rescind the resolution of April 9. Therefore, the • proposed Jacksonville Water District for this year has - been cancelled. However, we must all realize those residents where a water prob- lem exists should not be forgotten. Therefore, I have submitted an al- ternate plan tci•the'board which is not so 11g diose" or expensive but may satisfy the needs. . The plan could use the resources available within the Jacksonville community: 1. The Community Association pond behind Close Hall downtown in our hamlet has 1 to 2 million gal- lons of water. This area could be deepened and enlarged for a greater capacity. 2. Identify the polluted wells and research if them fs a cure for those problems. 3- Approach Mobil Oil Corp. for a large "good will" grant to cure the gasoline contamination: 4. There are Various springs and wells which `'overflow". this excess water could be shared with those less fortunate. I would like to thank all our resi- dents for expressing their concerns and ideas at the many special board meetings and the . April 9 pu6l4~ hearing and for' the many private communications to me. I am al- ways willing to listetio. work and help whenever possible for a re- sponsive town government. Trumansburg Thomas F. Reitz Ithaca Journal Tuesday, April 23, 198 by AEceJ arsen t would appear that. the hamlet of Jacksonville, N.Y., should have an adequate water. supply. Every home has its own well; there's a large pond and a flowing spring of water — all of which usually indicate a good supply of un-. derground water. Unfortunately, some of that water has been contam hated. At least 54 homes in Jacksonville, about la miles outside of Ithaca, are experiencing some form of water contamination. About six years ago it was discovered that gasoline had seeped into the wells of several Jacksonville homes. Im- mediately suspect as the most likely source of the: contamination, was the former ivlobil Gas station on `Route 96, now $e site of the independent Jacksonville Service Center. .Complaint s by the station owner at that time of un- explainable gasoline shortages failed to elicit immediate . investigation -by the Mobil Corporation. When gasoline was discovered in several water wells, home- owners contacted the New York State ,Qepartment of Transportation (DOT) and :t agency forced the corporation to as- lme responsiblity for the situation. (The DOT has jurisdiction over situations in- volving oil and gas spills.) The problem somehow, refuses to go away. Ulysses - Town Supervisor, Martin Luster, announced to the board in Mar- ch of 1984, that the gasoline problem in Jacksonville wells had not been resolved. In addition, the Tompkins County Department of Health reported' bacterial contamination in the area, and also excessive levels of nitrates. Nitrate contamination along Cold Springs Road was above the allowable limits for A town with a water-problean that won't go away. public water supplies, according to John Andersson, Director of Environmental Health Services for Tompkins County. The Saga Continues Mobil hired representatives to drill new wells for two homeowners at a cost of $5,506 apiece, only to discover that problems with the new wells were almost as bad as the old ones. The wells contained hydrogen sulfide and other odorous materials — possibly methane gas. Homeowners sued Mobil. Attorney Edward Abbott of Ithaca, who' -is representing two Jacksonville homeowners in lawsuits against Mobil, related that the Corporation sent :an engineering fnrn (Blasland and Bouck of aSyracuse) to study the problem. The firm oz,x determined that the task of directly re - i„ q; -covering the leaked gas was impossible &,l and advised filtering of the old gasoline - contaminated wells. In some of the wells a heavy rain often brings in a fresh sup ply of gasoline from an unknown un- ., derground 'source. The Mobil Cor- poration has supplied bottled water to some homeowners and recently hired a firm to install special fitters on four homes within the hamlet. "Mobil attorneys (Hinman, Howard "ek and Kottell of Binghamton) have been ;p pretty cooperative,” Abbott said, „butif e . , they (the corporation) can't clear out the old' -wells they will have to replace the "Replacing the houses" means .x ,xelocabng residents. Attorney john bavidge, of the Binghamton law firm representing Mobil, says that he . has received no recent communications regarding the Jacksonville lawsuits, but tie understands that the problem has been corrected by the installation of the filtering systems. 'The lawsuits are still outstanding," he said, "but I understand that the filters should make the water better than it was before." He felt that the lawstdts could be settled in the "near future," but- dicated that everyone wanted to make certain that the filters are doing the job. Dennis O'Neil, owner of Jacksonville K: Fishing Tackle and Boat Rentals on ` Jacksonville Road, and one of, the plain- tiffs in the lawsuit against Mobil, insists that the problem is not resolved. "We still have gasoline in our well," he said. "This has been going on since the spring of 1979." Water, Water Everywhere; Grapevine June 6-12, 1985 JACKSONVILLE. WATER. NEW DISCOVERY by Ban Larsen JACKSONVILLE —An undergroupd t k est atedlb have been out of •serVIce for over fifty years, stlll -containing. a Petroleum product, was dl$covered this month about 100 feet from the former site of a Mobil Corp. tank that In 1979 was reported to have leaked gasoline into area well. water: The discoveryllas come at atlmewhen officials arequestloning whether Mobil is soley responsible for contaminants found In local wells, Ulysses'Town Supervisor Martin Luster said last Tuesday. : • . Luster said 'he, Thornes .Suazzo of the state Department of Transportation and Pat -Hurd of Trumansburg.Ad., Jacksonville, .were standing at the corner of Jacksonville and Trumansburg Rds., across the street forn the former Mobil station, early this month when Hurd potn*&o_ut a locked cap to a tank he said he though'twas buried ther.0,lfiurd cut the locklmith a bolt cutter; and the fumes "stank to higft:heaven." said Luster: "Itwas obviously a Petroleum product -of some•sort." The DOT emptied the tank last Friday. There was water In -it as well as it petroleum product, Luster'said.- "But if it still contained.petroleum after all theseyears; thetarik couldn't have leaked veV:much," Luster saki.. "It's an environmenta6ftaisrd," saldtown Fire -Safety Inspector Robert Snedeker. "We should do whateverwecanlo get it out df there." The DOT wants to Jska a the tank In the ground until more testing can be done, Luster said. The department hasn't yet determined whether the tank may have contributed to local groundwater contamination. Last month 17 wells were tested for gasoline components, and the county health department has identified 12 more homesto be tested later this month. Luster said. Mobil has agreed, without admitting liability, to pay for water filtering systems In three •homes that were found last_month to contalri levels of benzene. a component of gasoline, higher than state regulations allow, Luster said. The"state's limit for benzene is five micrograms per liter cf water. Of4he 17 wells tested, four had excess levels: one at a gas station at the former Motill location, with 76; one at Hurd's 1858 Tf.Urnansburg Rd. residence, with 21; and two ata 591.Jacksonville Rd. residence, owned by Lee Sheperd; both'with 19. The health department has 8dvlsed those households not to drink their water'or use it for cooking. Testingbegan In wells nearest the former Mobil station. and Is continuing in an expanding circle. Luster said, to determine how large an area has been affected. "V1le're,working toward a solution,":hesaid, "andit's not going to be much longer before we get all the scientific information together. - "There's good. communication, and to this moment there's good co-operation among the health department, the department transportation, and'Mobll," Lustersaid. ' July 1985' Mobil will test drinking water at 11 more Jacksonville homes , By FRED YAHN Joumalstaf/ JACKSONVILLE —Mobil Oil Corp., acdused of polluting four private water wells here through a leaky service station gasoline tank coupling, is contacting I I ad- �ditional 'hm oeowners on the west side of Route 96 near the gas station to test their drinking water. The four homes that have polluted water are located along Jacksonville Road, and all are on the east side of Route 96. The service station, located on the west side of 1040.96 at the Jacksonville Road intersec- tion. �U 'owned by Ithacan Richard Berg- gTen .pd Ieased to Steven .Baker of Tru- mansiiurg. It isl w an independent service station and ha5'�o affiliation with a in ajor oil company:.. ' Roger Wright wasthe former owner -Op- erator. of the station, during the time six Years ago when it was.a Mobil affiliate and the alleged gas pollution, through a faulty connection, took place. At t time, sbiiie ticed a gas smell in theiraiers rThere is no municipal water system here, and all of the polluted wells were individually drilled. Subsequently, several homeowners filed lawsuits against- Mobil because of water pollution and what they claimed were the drastically reduced market values of their homes. None of the lawsuits has been settled. After discovery of the leak, the station did not sell gasoline for about three years -and was solely operated as a car repair shop. Wright continued to own the prop- erty, and then sold it to Berggrcn. Wright also is suing Mobil, because of the leak problem. When the station reopened as a service station in .June 19K the Department 'of Transportation (DOT), assured residents that -the gas tank coupling was safe. There have b6th no reported problems with -the new coupling, according to Town of Ulys- ses Supervisor Martin Luster. Baker says he monitors his gasoline sales on a. daily basis and has not found any problems. Mobil has supplied free bottled drinking water -to the affected homes for several years and has ins4iled free water filtering systems. According to. local governmental offi- cials who have rt'tsearched the problem, once gasoline hasttep into the ground, it doeq't :readily ' sipatq. The ' gasoline clings., to .rocks,tdd pollutes water that runs through It. "There are no le solutions to the problem.'said T i S Reitz, president of the Jacks&i4e' oitj nunity -Association. Reitz has propos , .that .the Community Associatiotx pond peliind Close. Hall, be utilized_puss a water •'sourcei along , with other springs :"wills in •the immedi- aie-nc�µUy. ..: ... He:_would also 'e to see Mobil issue a good wW "gram" -1cure the gas contami- nation. ` mast April, -the ` I sses Town'Board pro- posed the creatioa Jacksonville water district, which wot it have bcen,fed by the Trumansburg wg ' system. But, that %met with massive 6*'-: 10* n from residents, . who said it -o I cost too much. The board's•resoludon was rescinded.. There is now concern that the gas pollut- ion problem has spread to he west side of Route 96, but there is no proof that has happened;.according to Luster. Officials from Mobil, DOT, Ulysses and Tompkins County's Health Department re- cently agreed that Mobil would contact the 1 I homeowners by mail and then have their water independently tested, for free. •. If some of the homes' water is found to be polluted, there will be a re -sampling and perhaps more testing of additional wells lo- cated "in concentric circles" 'around the service station, said John Andersson, the county's director of environmental health services. ` "I don't know when the water tests will be completed and results made public," Andersson said. Also raising concern Is he f3tgtiing of benzene, 'one of the components -of gaso- line and a known carcinogen, in he drink- ing water of a residence owned by Lee Shepherd. An amount of 6 ppb (parts per billion) of benzene and another chemical, toluene, was been found in Shepherd's. wa- ter. The discovery is significant, since it's the Ithaca Journal July 1985 first well on the west side of Route 96;th4 hu been found with gasoline pollutants.'if the water, possibly caused by the 1979 leaid Shepherd's house is uphill and south of h+ service station. i "We'renot sure, but the leak is possible from the service station tank," Andeissoi said. "We can't definitely say." The federal government's maximum ad ceptable level of benzene in water is 5 ppb Andersson said. Shepherd had her wate. privately tested. • • 11 Another homeowner on the west side Q Route 96, near Shepherd, had his watt, tested and the results proved negit iie:. _ Shepherd has decided to join in the low suits against Mobil. s Reitz also is concerned about the druiX Ing water at the Jacksonville Commimit; Church.- It is located on the -east side o Route 96, slightly north of the service sta tion.. "It's a place where a lqt of people con gregate, and where there are a.lot of com munity functions$" said Reitz.' "I woult like to see Mobil test the water there, but sc far they haven't." i Eleven More Wells to .be Tested in J -Ville "I don't know if it was a coincidence or if it was a direct result of the recent media coverage," says Thomas Reitz,. president of the Jacksonville - Com- mWutY . Association, „but I personally believe that the Grapevine -story had something to-do with it." The "it" in this case was the decision by Mobil, the New York State Depart- ment of Transportation )which handles all oil spills), and Ulysses and Tom. Akins County Health Department of- ficials to independently test eleven more Jacksonville homeowners' water supplies for free. The Grapevine's June ' 6-12 cover story ("Water, Water Everywhere! But Is It'Safe to Drink?") b Alice Larsen focused on the history of the Jacksonville contamination prob- lem and led to some tough questions being asked by us (and groups like Greenpeace) about Mobil's respon. sibility to the community, in the pre- sent. In 1979, some J -Ville residents discovered gasoline had seeped into them' wells, possibly from a leaky underground' storage tank used by- a Mobil service station; which at that time was located .on the west side of Route 96 in the center of the village. A lawsuit against Mobil filed -'by a number -Of homeowners has. been in the works ever. since. Mobil has sup= pYied fr ,jrb tF1ttS �tuikii g Wat�i"to af- fected homes -and has also installed some free water filtering systems of questionable value. Grapevine July 25-31, 1985 Since the publication of the Grape- vine story, the well of a residence own- ed by Lee Shepherd in Jacksonville has been found to contain benzene, a cancer causing chemical that is also found in gasoline. The Ithaca Journal's Fred Yahn, in an excellent story on July 20,: reported that• the discovery was significant because it is the first well on the west side of Route 96 to be found with gasoline pollutants in the water, which may have been caused by the 1979 leak. Is this gas contamination problem spreading? Has- it been there since 1979? The answers to these questions might come when the new test results are finally in. However, that doesn't . mean more questions don't need to be asked. "Why don't they test the -water at the Jacksonville Community Church?" wonders Reitz. "There are a lot of public meetings held there,- and a nursery school." Good question, since there is a possibility the water- there is con- taminated as well. We will see what we can find out. Three more Jacksonville wells are found to be polluted By FRED YAHN Joumal Staff - JACKSONVILLE — The water pollution problem here has worsened. as three more wells- have been found to have water unfit for drinking,. according to the Tompkins County Health Department. Following -independent tests of 14 more wells, with laboratory analysis paid for by the Mobil. Oil Corp., the health department has .revealed that ater from three at -those wells contains more benzene — a carcin- ggen — than the five parts per billion the state-alIows. Mobil, formerly associated with a service station at the Intersection of Jacksonville Road and Route a 96, already has been accused of polluting. four residential wells from -that station's gasoline storage tank six years ago when a czo_% don between a gas pump and - an underground st tank failed and went unno- ticed. 'It'salleged that g spline seeped into nearby private wells: Some residentf noticed a gasoline smell in'their water, while others did not. Several of the homeown- ers sued Mobil, but&ihinghas•been resolved.. Those four residences; all on the east side of Route 96 near Jacksonv&Aoad, have been offered free bot - tied drinking water and water filters. Residents ;have en drinI Ug the bottled water and some have: used Iters, but the pollution and its widening threat "have not dissipated. Mobil officials could not be reached for comment following this latest discovery. Irwin Adler, a Mobil engip4er who, has been work- ing closely with the state Department of Transporta- tion (DOT) and with local health department officials, refused comment and referred calls to Mobil's public relations headquarters. Roger Wright was -the owner -operator of the service station at the time of the alleged pollution incident. He has sold the property to Richard Berggren•of Itha- ca, who leases the station to Steven Baker of Jackson- ville. One of the thiee.waterwells found to bcpolluted in this latest study was at the gas, station, according to John Andersson, the county's director of environmen- tal health. The suspect tank coupling• thgt supposedly caused the pollution was -repaired 1png ago; and Baker said he regularly has the gas -tank system checked and approved. Turn to WELLS. Page 7 Wells Continued from Page 1 The two other polluted wells were in homes to the near northeast of the gas. station. -Because Anders- son was notified of the new pollut- ion study by DOT officials orally, he would not reveal the names of the people with the newly discov- ered polluted wells until a written report arrives from the participat- ing firm, Friends Laboratory of Waverly. Andersson said he has advised residents of the new results and has warned 'them about the drinking water. The latest testing was a joint effort of Mobil, the Department of Transportation, the county -health department and the Town of Ulys- ses. There are more than 50' sub- stances in gasoline, and the. three major ones checked in these water tests were benzene, xylene and to= lue-ne. Six wells'on the east side of Route 96 were -tested, along- with eight on the west side. Andersson said three other wells tested showed no. sign of pollut- ants, and the remaining eight tested showed some signs of pollution, but. came within the state's safe drinking guidelines. What's next? "We'll be re -sampling all of the homes that we tested and possibly test homes in a wider area," An - Ithaca Journal. Friday, August 30, 1985 "It's hard to predict where gaso- line will seep, once it gets into the rock strata," he said. "There is no real pattern to it." There is no municipal water sys- tem in Jacksonville, • and in April, the Town of Ulysses withdrew a Proposal to create a Jacksonville water district, with water drawn from the Trumansburg system. Town officials said the cost would be too great for residents. Now, town officials are looking into the feasibility of getting water from nearby springs, such as those along Cold Springs Road. Accord- ing to officials, this could b6 much less expensive than getting water from the Trumansburg system. Ulysses Town Supervisor Martin Luster said, "I am glad that the health department and the Depart- ment of Transportation are so deeply involved. The town will wait for the results of this third testing, but I anticipate that after all testing is complete, we will call a meeting of the town board and ask for rep- resentation by the DOT, health de- partment, our engineer, our attor- ney and the . governor's ombudsman's office to come up with a solution that is economically feasible and sound from a health and engineering point of view. . "The town will be involved and will do whatever is necessary to re- solve the situation." Morewells will be tested � in Jacksonville W By FRED YARN Jouina/Staff JACKSONVILLE — Eleven more private. water wells, in addition to the 14 that were recently tested here by an independent laboratory, are soon to be checked for the carcinogen benzene. . Mobil Oil Corp., accused of polluting a few local wells following an alleged gasoline leak at a gas station here sin years ago, paid ' for the independent tests, which were done by Friends Laboratory of Waverly. The 25 wells to be tested are within a quarter -mile of the suspected gasoline leak, in a circular pattern. In the most recent testing during July, the gas sta- tion, -now with a different owner and operator, and two homes, were found to have unacceptable levels of benzene, according to John Andersson, Tompkins CouAty's director of environmental health services. This past week, Andersson received the written re- port from Friends Laboratory. The two homes identi- fied -as having water with unacceptable levels of ben- zene were owned by Lee Shepherd (591- Jacksonville Road) and Edward Hurd (1858 Trumansburg Road). Under " state guidelines, water that contains more than.five parts per billion (ppb) of benzene, is consid- ered undrinkable. Shepherd's well was found to have 19 ppb; the Hurd home had 21 ppb, the report said. -Anderssoh and several officials, including those from Mobil and the state's Department. of Transpor- tation (DOT), are not convinced that the only source of pollution is from the alleged gas leak. The most recent test findings threw another quirk into the mystery. Several wells located -between, the Shepherd and Hurd houses, it -distance of about 500 feet, were checked by Friends Laboratory personnel. The wells were found not to have benzene,. Andersson said. Shepherd first discovered she had benzene in her house's well when she had the water privately checked in the early summeF.. The finding was significant, Since it was the first well to be found with benzene on the west side of Route 96. Four private .wells had been previously found with benzene, all on the east side of Route 96. The Hurd property with benzene is northwest of the gas station. The Shepherd house is south of the gas station. Hurd. owns several pieces of property in the vicinity. Andersson said this week he wasn't sure if Mobil would pay for this additional testing, which costs about S50.per well. He said that another laboratory, other than Friends, probably would do the testing. Andersson said it would be premature to formulate plans fQr alternative water sources for Jacksonville, until thg pollution problem was clearly identified. It's also expected that "observation" .wells will be. drilled, to try and get a better grasp on where the p01- lation is being.generated. Ithaca Journal September 7, 1985 Mobil Speaks, Jscksonvjile Waite By Dan Larsen JACKSONVILLE — It's been six ybars since on ctamingnts from a Mobil station's ledkmg gasoline tarsit were detected in several local wells. Tests ddno again lata month show the problem still exists. Residents want cledtl water. Now. 'The comMuni1 y its$If isid•¢ennis O',�i { owner of Jaciisondilie'#ishing Tech a etld keit, last inti. "it's spreading. I don't knout hi, f g. 'A gofngto spree Nobody krt9ws that.' "Mobil Corp, hasn't do". 111ou hq".-he said. j '?hey dont _ifo anything *01,, jt$ i re.forced to don't do anything on their olivrti7VAyB% eiirtoncarn they haven't In 'six years solve hsproblern CertainlytfV. have the technology, the r6#4ft" Contaminants were 01 sled in the spring of 109{ O'Neil said, that evp6i th�e li lnto well water franc r underground gasoljno'tiir aia4orr}leihAbbil station acth% corner, of Trumanaburd •olid Jacksoriville Rds. The proliei was turned over to thdoale Department of Transportat oh, which has jurisdiction ovyer oil al o gasoline spills. Mo Corp. paid'}b}Wasting ani �i s proyided bottled wateik b • residerits'*v ih a fO' ed wiills. But d'Neil and hiswife, Patt�F, say Mobil h'as acted tob oipvUly; "Why haven't they doneanittliirig ahoutthewater?" spa Ratty. "1'd iiketo see it taken caro V, •for good, a perm6h.A;' Water system. Whatabout ten•yea�rs'jrom nowtWhat abbd1t two houses down, if their water,•gpiss bsdi The immedis ' area should jY' covered." Gail Jani n, Mobil Corp. Eb# Coast Public Realtion Director 'oflley Porge, says tljfa problem is not so simgiet "There ere various things that have to be done.1' sequence Ydu.0gfi?t just come .fn and stick a straw in t#d. -round and siA i4ituif up, you heye-to go step bysteP aft 1 time consuniir)g i�iit�W want to do it right so it will be taken care pf once o,nMiVah." In October -1W. ; tIobil . Corp. paid for water filtetfof me systems for'$eversl hos south of the station, includ* the O'Werls -ljear system doesn't work. "As of 'todq It?b�'not functioning right," said Dennis , 'They can Iliiil'a rrn ori i}ie'rrio6n; why can't they gotta+ water fiflering yt ;o work rightr Jannipaatili{AQ. r 19 -war. rtdtdn manufagt�r'"fir`ftis[ail them. Shia suggested residents contact ihe manufacturer or installation contractor if their syteins eiddafective, as they were probably v4arrarueed: The m�rfapt t ai authorities are_ mainly concerped With Is iuoti a gptorless, aromatic liquid that rs a fry= product lifteilrwrtidilation„RAKzeneisclassifiedbythe Interstatd �Cd tinefoe Crnmission as a flammable liquid. aryd ii-dikd anortiirhJmari carcinogen” tiyifie Natiofniil Safety Cot}r%r*if: Tile ior )kb'phh fieiarti is intialatian piits ' vapors: ;C-Oionfc poid06g occurs with regular exposure to "ucisafe tioacentr *.0'the results of which can inc`fude lf� end �teilrt 4dafj��1'de,, and deatls. , Tri Village Pennysaver September 12, 1985 Benzene .float$ 66 wbtee if it V4r& t$,`W6r Well` iirater it yGApuld-some out at the kitbhgrl»tap The Benzene feVels fti4 d tri .f $i ksonville are minute, Says Jo� Anderson o} .� a �'o_0'k.i0 Cbuitty Health .i�QParjmant. "We ie talking about ide • levels here, and these chemicals can gomefrom+atxqurces, eventhe individual -homes themse[yas"i such gs paint tfyniter, gasoline or other household clemica'ft,fjtet mightigo into drams or tFie ground 'The Nf otSii i?ank is i b tWnly a major source, but not necessarily the ,only ane." The Iteafth ddpii&hent's limit for benzene is 5 micro'ralps W.,liter of water, he said. On July 31 and Ai}gu 7, 'Fnenif LiibrM464 . tnc:'of Wairarly, New York, tested water from 17 wells and 2 taps. 8eiren 11W -ills contained benzene, four exceeded the health depart nent•'s 5 mic.7a. limit: a gas station at the former Mobil location, pith 76; an 1858 Tiuinansburg Rd. residenc*ownedby,Patlrlurd with2`I;and2wellsata691 Jacksonville Rd. residence, owned by tee sheperd, bath Wirth i�. Are thane levdls iiangerousi "I%gIdthinkatthose lev,Afsthe numbs rswouldbevery insignificant," said Anderson.'Thereds really no threshafd -You livejsarnajicnumber and anything under that is OK. Th4eIs nt5=@ra r1sK,The lower the concentration and the lest .gou're•e$pdsed to It, the lower your risk." - And test results will fluctuate, he added. "We dant know enoLgh 'about these cher ifcals to tell exactly hdw consistent they are. We're talking about very minute qupS.tities,-They.can .vary from vveeklo.:week and even from;day to ddy." But residents Nuhn to be kept'informed. Thb'y haven't been say§ 'f'oin 1teiti, -President of 4he Jacksonville Commuristy As$ociation.- He bard rebiddhts would -49 inibre ted in d 'meeting among J' o 'public, if lysses '.YQwn offjcijE is, the state D partment of Transportation, -the • county health department, and Mobil Cor` 'A aggaestedW.'UlyssesTown supervisor Martin Lusters . "There• eye seven homes definitely contaminated," said Reitz "We've. got a• problem. We'd like to have a meeting becausew4VIlke, a: to see h6wserioustheP.roblent it. b.0 have some Wei' drn the-residerlts as to how ttlay d like to see this- problem solved; and' c.' to • open -up the communications betwedn the public and the officials." "If someone would like to hold this meeting, by all means let's get it organized and.get it going," said Jamin. But; she said, Mobil Corp. engineers may not be willing to attend, asit's their policy not to make information pubfft:. The engineer who has handled they Jacksonville water problem, l win Allier of Albany, refused to comipent, But'oii6il iS ieady tit take responslbitlty, Jgifin said. ti 6jie a had been doing webeileved`46taking ciireof the problem: The •latest test show -that it indeed has not. Wa1l:be getting,together with the DQT;•avdw. jIl C. @.nainllt . - whatever is possible to correct the problem;" ... .. .ter ' DOT Ourn's fluid from. -gas stank: in Jaicksdnville By FRED YARN Jouma/ Staff JACKSONVILLE _ In their search foi clues to the Jacksonville water pollution mastery; State Depart- ment of Transportation (DOT) workmen have pumped an unknown quantity of what they suspect to be -gasoline from a defunct gasoline tank at the former Jacksonville Variety Store. - . No longer a variety store, the house is owned by Ed- mund Hurd -of Trumansburg, who owns some other properties nearby. The defunct tank is about 150 feet north of the working tank at the Jacksonville service station. Seve- ral years ago, there was a working gasoline pump at the variety store, but that was closed. Last week, DOT officials were told there was a closed *tank under. the variety store, and they promptly opened the cap and discovered what they believed was gasoline: Workmen sre expected to use an absorbent to try to soak up as mucid gasoline as possible and then to fill the tank with sand. . Six years ago, there was a broken coupling between l a pump and a tank at the Jacksonville service station, which allegedly leaked gasoline into -the ground water. The station was then affiliated with the Mobil Oil Corp. Today. the station is operating under different ownership, and the suspect tank ,is functioning prop- erly. It is regularly checked for leaks. Four homes, all on the east side of Route 96 across from the gas station, were found ,to have gasoline in their drinking water after the initial leak: Gasoline contains the carcinogen benzene and that chemical was found in water checks for those four homes. . In independent tests funded by Mobil and taken this summer, three more water wells were found to have unsafe levels of benzene (greater than five parts per billion).. The most recently discovered. wells with benzene were all on the west side of Route 96. One, well sup- plies the lavatory At the service station, while the other two are connected to private homes — one owned by Lee Shepherd, the other by Hurd. Ther latter home is the site of the variety store. According to John Andersson, Tompkins County's director of. environmental health services, Mobil has told the DOT that it will install a carbon filter for the service station's lavatory. Residents with - known polluted wells -have been drinking bottled water supplied by Mobil. Ithaca Journal September 14, 1985 : the watervells under a. :B.YGMrNPEICff JAcKSiONVILLE-,Acco-rding to the Bureau of '.Toxiesubstances-Management of the New York State Department -of'Health; .benzene is a known human eareipogent. .It `is"this .substance's presence in the well water of several- residences in the Jacksonville area that' has caused repeated investigation of the water supply. The maximum amount permissible under the Bureau's guidelines, ,five micrograms per liter,, has been ex- ceeded in some instances. Martin Luster, Ulysses Town Supervisor, said that :the-Departmant of Transportation (DOT)-, working in �n�ore te��a� �ri��.t��•���`. $� ����jj((,,%��%yy�� �'-�i conjunction with the Depaftmetit=of•Health, is setting up the latest. and perhaps last round .of testing to determine the volume -and geographic; perimeter of the water pollution 'problem. Saying, "Itshould be fairly conclusive," Luster explained that the wells were scientifically selected and represent a fairly wide circle- around irclearound the -area where gasoline substances have leaked through the rock strata. The wells to be tested include ones which were tested in a group in August, plus' the four original sites where pollution was confirmed, as well as' additional - homes. The decision to -test the water again was 0 arranged at a meeting with Luster, and representatives -fr,P t -the DOT and Tompkins County Health Depart- ment. Terming it a "cooperative effort," Luster said that the Mobil Oil Corporation was helping with the paperwork,. In a new development that has already.fueled. the controversy, the DOT tapped a tank located in front of the Edmund Hurd house and the Jacksonville Variety Store last Thursday. That tank contained a gasoline -like substance that was reportedly 30 years old. _ Arrangements will be made to empty the tank. Sit. years ago a leak in a coupling to a gas tank caused -gasoline to seep into the water -supply near the Jacksonville service station operated by Roger Wright. Since Mobil Oil had supplied that gasoline, that com- pany has been involved in litigation with residents in the. nearby area and has supplied drinking -water and filtration systems -to some affected by tbe.leak. The discovery of gas in another area opens new questions. Tom Reitz, President of the Jacksonville Community Association said that the tank in front of Hurd's had been installed around' X920 and probably had not been used since 1938. Pridr to 1984 there was no law. regulating. the removal of old gas tanks. continued on page .2 had water tested in the August samplings, explaining the results. Of the 14 iested at that time,. threeshowed .significant levels of -contamination. while there were traces in some of -the others. Current plans call for a meeting of affected resi- dents, interested townspeople, the, Ulysses Town Board, DOT, Department of Health, and a representative from the State Ombudsman's Office, according to Luster. Observation wells will be -drilled to determine the boundaries and the flow of any gasoline seepages. b � W ell�te'sting Gasoline was also pumped at one time at the current U, site of Jacksonville Antiques, on the northwest corner K n of the Jacksonville intersection. Most, people believe aQ co that the tank was removed but no one was willing to N state so with assurance. .-. m Luster -reported that he has individually contacted `0 m 30 residences in the area to inform them to expect new K testing. He also sent out letters to each individual who M Martin Lester; Ulys W Tou&Supein or, -iaid -that-the Department of Tramp rtli►tion (DOT), working in conjunction:W1t1Cik Department -of Health, is sletting�npahe latest and perhaps last round of testing to determine the volume and geographic perimeter of the water -pollution -.problem. 0 arranged at a meeting with Luster, and representatives -fr,P t -the DOT and Tompkins County Health Depart- ment. Terming it a "cooperative effort," Luster said that the Mobil Oil Corporation was helping with the paperwork,. In a new development that has already.fueled. the controversy, the DOT tapped a tank located in front of the Edmund Hurd house and the Jacksonville Variety Store last Thursday. That tank contained a gasoline -like substance that was reportedly 30 years old. _ Arrangements will be made to empty the tank. Sit. years ago a leak in a coupling to a gas tank caused -gasoline to seep into the water -supply near the Jacksonville service station operated by Roger Wright. Since Mobil Oil had supplied that gasoline, that com- pany has been involved in litigation with residents in the. nearby area and has supplied drinking -water and filtration systems -to some affected by tbe.leak. The discovery of gas in another area opens new questions. Tom Reitz, President of the Jacksonville Community Association said that the tank in front of Hurd's had been installed around' X920 and probably had not been used since 1938. Pridr to 1984 there was no law. regulating. the removal of old gas tanks. continued on page .2 had water tested in the August samplings, explaining the results. Of the 14 iested at that time,. threeshowed .significant levels of -contamination. while there were traces in some of -the others. Current plans call for a meeting of affected resi- dents, interested townspeople, the, Ulysses Town Board, DOT, Department of Health, and a representative from the State Ombudsman's Office, according to Luster. Observation wells will be -drilled to determine the boundaries and the flow of any gasoline seepages. Ithaca Journal (? ) ORN March 1', 1986 Jacksonville' well problems linger; session. set for March * FRED YARN JOU"ud Sguff. JACKSONVILLE — * Some Jacksonville residents are still won-. daring when their water will be $t to drink. After three'rounds of tests taken in 1985 T two of them showing negative results' there has_.been.. i no further pubfic•discussion of the drinIgng water problem,- which sur- facedsixyears ago. The carcinogen benzene was found ai that time in about four of the private water i wells. i The suspected .sourm was a faulty subterranean coupling lknk- -ing a gas ftorage talc 'with pumps at a Mobil station qn Route 96 in the center of this Hamlet. The town of Ulysses has sched- uled a March 3 meeting -at the Jack- _ sonville Community Church and has invited Department ot-Environ- ! mental Canseivation engineer Tom Siiozzo and. Tompkins .County en- • dmnmeatal health services director 36hik dersson-£o•revkbwthe Jack- w" ack- drinking water problem. . . ?The public is }nvited to the 7:30' 1 p.>34: session:' According to. Liiysses Supervise= Minta Al. Luster, there will be e c6m'pmkez. � ,Qe presentation of aD of. the tw ig. "Ropd1my, -there wgl - be ii scientific projection of what -the future holds, concerning the gas pollution," Luster said. ".And, I' #Pepe they can give. us some guidg._ in targeting a likely area for us>K by the town hoard kn considering, its options, orae of ' vvhiich may be a .limned -use water district." L• i*er sadr , In April 1985, Luster proposed a reaoiution that .would have autho- rized ;a Jacksonville water district, . but .he wijW6w it When it became clear that• it`would have been too much of a financial burden on resi- dents. . Residents with polluted wells re-. ! ctive bottled drinking water and fil- tars for their water systems from Mobil. But residential market va liras have been hurt by. the pollut- ion, and some residents who were ea -to -sell their homes years ago. can't, because of the shadavv of Iutiori. • . " DEC official asks for Viile water cleanup FRED YARN Jowria/ Staff JACKSONVILLE — A state Department of Envi- ronmental Conservation oil spill expert has recom- mended a major cleanup for Jacksonville's tonic water problems. No�mention was mad ?of how much the cleanup would cost. The expert, Tom Suozzo of the DEC's Regibn Sev- • en department, told about 70 residents here Monday night that a fourth round of water tests would be done this spring in the Jacksonville area. Following those tests, Suozzo said he would ask the original polluter — Mobil Oil Corp. — to pay for a recovery well and for the removal of gasoline .that is stili in the soil beneath. the center of this hamlet, Suozzo said he had not yet formally informed Mo- bil of the plan.or of his intention to ask the corpora- tion to pay for the•cleanup. If Mobil doesn't do the cleanup work, Suozzo said the state would do it and seek reimbursement from Mobil. The Jacksonville drinking water problem surfaced in March 1979, when the Tompkins County Health Department identified four homes on the east side of Route 96 (south side of Jacksonville Ikoad) with gaso- line in their wells. Subsequently, according to Suozzo, Mobil admitted that the gasoline had come from a leaky coupling in an underground tank ata service station on the west side of Route 96. ; There probably were earlier, leaks from the tank, which was installed in 1952, but those were never veri- fied, Suozzo said. Mobil provided bottled drinking water and carbon filters for the four homes with pollution., Benzene, a carcinogen, was found ' in the four homes' water sources. Toluene and xylene were two other toxins that were also identified in some other weds in the vicinity. In 1985, three rounds of tests were done on several wells in the center of Jacksonville: The initial round of Tum to DEC, Page 2 Continued from ftp 1 tests last August brought raised new concerns• from state and local health officials, as 15 of 17 wells showed organic contamination and four of those wells had •benzene.• d3ut;'iti two subsequent tests, the testa generally proved negative.' Suozza. odd he -thought the levels. of benzene and other toxins in the suspect was are lessening, but he added: "It's always possi'bk that there will be a problem for some time to come." In a cleanup operation, gas would be taken out of the aquifer, which. lies about 20 feet below the ground, and then water which con- tains ontains some of the dissolved "prod- uct" — gasoline.— also would be pumped out of the ground and trucked away. Currently, according to the county's environmental health di- rector John Andersson, there are five homes in the Jacksonville area that have carbon filters for their water supply, and another well, at the. gas station, also has known lev- els of benzene. "Carbon filters are an interim solution at best," Suozzo said. Andersson urged residents to consider forming a water district for the center of Jacksonville, which would serve approximately 40 homes. Andersson said the water district the proposal to bring water from. Trumansburg," he said. "Building a water system is not going to be cheap," Luster said. "But the longer we delay. the more WgxMslve it's going t0 get." Luster said that governmental. funding for such a project would be difficult to obtain. He said the water problem would be an agenda item at the March 11 Ulysses town board mating. Ithaca Journal Tuesday, March 4, 1986 mobil and DEC plan Jmvile Waterasesson By FRED YAHN Journid Staff JACKSONVILLE — Officials ,,'from Mobil oil Corp. will meet with Thomas Suozzo, state Depart- ment of Environmental Conserva- r tion oil -spill expert, here next Tues- -day to continue working on a 4 solution to. Jac ksonviIIe's 7 -year- old water -pollution problem. Mobil has admitted guilt in pol- luting four private water wells with gasoline that leaked into rock strata from a faulty tank connection at a service station on Route 96 in the center of this hamlet. That station subsequently ' was closed, bought by another person and leased to an operator, who stopped selling gasoline there about two months ago; but continued auto -service operations. The sec. .ond owner ' regularly checked the. connection and did trot have any problem. Barry Rollins of Ithaca will re- Ithaca Journal March 11, 1986 open the station March 17 for gaso- line sales. Richard Berggren of Newfield owns the station. Mobil has supplied bottled drinking' water and carbon filters for :water systems to homes with Polluted wells. Suozzo has been working with local governmental officials, resi- dents and Mobil officials to try to eradicate the pollution problem for more, than I' i years. He told resi- dents is a public meeting last week that if lvlobil didn't watt to con- duct and pay for the cleanup, then the.state would do it. He reassured residentsthat his agency would do all it could * to clean up the pollution. He also said it was possible the state would seek reimbursement from Mobil, if the company refused to do the cleanup. The Town of Ulysses board is ex- pected to discuss the possibilities of forming a Jacksonville water dis- trict at its 7:30 p.m. meeting today. Jaclon We citizens. -hear op#ions for. well system_ By OERI SPEICH JACKSONVILLE—More, than :75 residents of the Jacksonville area, attended a March 3 public -hearing' to provide a complete'.report concerning the con- tamination of ground water supplies from gasoline products. Technical 'analyses were presented. by Thomas Suozzo .of the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and John Andersson, Tompkins County'Health Director: Among the toxins to, be dealt with are benzene, toluene, and,aylene, according to John •And6ioni, -The problem has been: compounded by :the mixed results from previous teats. The scope of the problem was termed -"far reaching" and the solutions will be costly. Suozzo says. DEC is ready to move forward with a plan'to install a recovery well system, utilizing a two -pump system. The . cost of the installation should be borne by Mobil, ac- cording to :SubftWf:Rt3ridicatdd he -would pursue the matter with, c omlf iYAu� act4hrough the state at- torney general's. office; if necessary,, to recoup the cost -should* Mobil balic'at paying for the, clean=up. No estimates on.the,�btal cost were available. Suozzo said the oil spill' bureau, which w4s•started in,' 1978,: is-iearning more about the recovery process as it. deans • with • th]4 -type of • problem.Although the Jacksbnville contamination was fust detected in March, of 4979; when four homes in the center of Jacksonville Continued on backpgge Trumansburg Free Press March 12,•1986 From page 1 J ckson11111 were identified by _the:• :Health Department as con- taining- gasoline-infil" '6& wells, the admission of guilt %on tete part. oi'.Mobil and their subsequent under- writing- of the cost..o, provide .drinking water and car- bon filters to those. homes took-'" ome time. The original leak of gasoline was identified as originating from a tank. connection in an underground tank. A member of the audience remembers perfor- ming the necessary excavation work to install the tanks in '51, or. '52, "and they've been leaking since 1960," he said. Suozio 'outlined the necessary steps to be taken to deal with the problem of the ,-pollution in the water supply. These include' a fourth round of testing for �svells in the targeted area. Removal of the gas products in the aquifer will be attempted through installation of a recovery well system. This would necessitate drilling of two wells; one approximately at 18 feet, the level of the ground water, and -one at around 30 feet. Pumps would be. used ' to extract' the gas contaminants thus recovered. Among the toxins to be dealth with are benzene, toluene and xylene, according to John Andersson. The Problem has been Ccompounded by the mixed results from.previous tests. Souzzo mentioned that the timing of the tests also provides interesting data. "It rears its ugly head when groundwaters rise," he said. Thus the fourth round of testing will be scheduled in the spring, as the water levels rise and place contaminants back in- to the ground water supply. Andersson concurs with both the definition of the problem and •the solutions to be attempted. August tests showed 15 of 17 wells tesied containing con- taminants. In September most tests were negative and a third round in November proved 13 out of. 15 without organic contamination. "Ivly biggest recommendation is for the :people of Jacksonville to get together and -create a water district," Andersson says. He suggested the residents look at a water system that will provide only drinking water and not serve a. wide area nor serve to provide fire protection or water for industrial use. The town -would have to coordinate such a project but Anderson says the presstlMhas-td come from. the people,, ?own Supervisor'Martin' Lusterre-erri, sh2�sixed that solutions attempted before by the town board, in par- ticular last Spring's attempt to create a water district, met with opposition town -wide due to the costs.. "If there is now interest in a modified pian, you've got to tell us," he said. He continued, "But if you're not in- terested in that we'll look for another solution." Discussion on the possibility of using a surface water system was .nixed by Andersson . who said it would be'much too costly to treat for public use. There are possible areas to be drilled with some indication given that water could be found near- the aquifer located at Willow Creek,and Taughannock State Park. Luster also said there was a possibility of finding water -near Agard or'Kraft roads except that those sources are "downgrade" -of the current water supply and that is the way the ground water is moving, possibly carrying the pollutants with it. He asked for a recom- mendation of the area to be served by a water system and Anderson recommended approximately 1,000 feet from the current center of the problem. That would service approxirimately 30 or 40 homes. Luster said the problem would be put on the next agenda for the town board.. "I will propose that we. start from scratch "he said and seek a local source, get estimates and then hold further public hearings. Bill Smith addressed the group to say, "This problem is ten years over -due." He added that it is now much more expensive a :proposition. than. years ago due to the passage of -.time. Luster concurred, saying the level of potential funding has dropped and is now substantially reduced. Jacksonville residents study their .lingering water p r-oble-m JACKSONVILLE — A committee of Jacksonville citizens is forming to investigate possible municipal water system sources for the. hamlet. Five private wells here are polluted by gasoline from a faulty Mobil Oil Corp. underground tank coupling at a service station seven years ago. Two of three water tests here last year proved neg- ative; -but Town of Ulysses and state Department of Environmental Conservation officials are pursuing a cleanup operation and further solutions to the drink- ing water problem.. Jacksonville has only private wells. A municipal wa- ter system would serve approximately 40 homes in the hamlet's center. Ithaca Journal .: March 15, 1986 Tompkins County environmental services director John Andersson has recommended that a water sys- tem carrying only drinking water would be the best so- lution. Town of Ulysses Supervisor Martin A. Luster and other officials are looking at possible water sources. Although they want a cleanup, DEC officials said they think the gas pollution never can be totally erad- icated, It also recommends, a new water system. Luster proposed a Jacksonville water district last year, but then withdrew his resolution when a large majority of town residents told him they couldn't af- ford the district; l�ew wa#er" supply: c�s#em considered 1_o.r 1ysses By GE4RI SPEICH ULYSSES—The Ulysses Town Board met on March I1 to consider an agenda that included presentations from Hector's Finger Lakes National Forest ranger Hilary Dustin and SPCA representative Robin Remick. Dustin described the 10 -year management plan. that will be implemented. to assess national resources and reported that public comment is -sought as part of the assessment process. Speaking for the SPCA, Remick acted as a liaison to promote -the ser vices of the group. One suggestion offered was to in- crease impoundment fees and thus have violators pay more for dog control. Town Supervisor Martin Luster summarized the in- formation presented at a 'public hearing on the Jacksonville water problems and sought direction from the board on a recommended course of action.'A recommendation from County Health director John Andersson to provide a limited water supply system would indicate the -board should locate possible sour- ces of supply and test the water for quality. Councilman Vorp questioned whether the residents wd'uld support any project in view of last year's rejec- tion of a water supply project. as too expensive for the residents. He said, "We don't want to spin our wheels doing nothing if our help isn't wanted." Councilman .Weatherby concurred saying, "I don't think we should spend any town's money yet-" The Jacksonville Community Association will act to assess the -support for any project in the area and Luster will make Health Department and Department of Environmental Con- servation officials aware of information that has been presented, and concerns of the board on the re - From pag- Ulyrsses opening of the gas station in Jacksonville. . The need to provide adequate water to residents was underlined by Jacksonville resident Dennis O'Neil. Questioning Councilman Reitz's approach and saying, "he only became involved six or eight months ago." O'Neil said he and other residents affected by the gasoline seepage into their well water supply had six to seven years of experience. "The bottom line js there is gas in the ground and it's going to be there for the foreseeable future," he said. Another round of testing has been ordered by Tom Suozzo, a DEC official who is handling the in- vestigation into the problem before any concrete plan can be implemented. He will also meet with Mobil Oil Corp, representatives again to determine what actions will be underwritten by them in the clean-up. The board discussed the need to support the renovations' project at the Trumansburg firehouse, Luster said he would like to schedule a town infor- mational meeting to concentrate on. projected costs and, after considering town input, formulate a resolution of intent on -participation. The meeting is to Trumansburg Free Press March 19, 1985 Continued on bark page not only help keep homes more comfortable to live in, but help combat rising energy costs. By ' taking on energy saving home. improvement projects you'll also help make your. dwelling more desirable to potential buyers when you're ready to seel it. According to Norman Becker,.author of The Com- plete Book of Home.lnspection, inadequate insulation levels in the attic and crawl space are two of the three most common house problems that new home buyers encounter. In fact, recent surveys have found that ap- proximately 50 percent=of the nation's homes are -still underinsulated by today's energy standards. To give homeowners an added incentive to take on energy saving do-it=yourself projects, many home cen- ters are offering sales on products, Such as fiber glass insulation. Many manufacturers. are also announcing promotions to encourage do-it-yourselfers to take on home improvement projects this winter: CertainTeed Corporation, for example, is offering valuable free gifts for purchases of packages of 6'/. " thick R-19 (or greater) fiber glass insulation-unfaced, kraft, or foil- faced—that are purchased.from a CertainTeed retailer this winter. Questions from readers about household energy use are welcome to appear .in Energy Cents. If you're faced with a repair problem orsimply.cpr�fused about the- service you're receiving, your question - could be shared by others. Send your question to Energy Cents, Odyssey Publications, P.O. Box 168, -Newfield, NY 14867 or call 1-800-521-5572. Ten dollars will, be paid for questions an- swered in Ertergy-Cents. be scheduled for April 7 at 7:30 p.m.- in the Town Hall. Members of the fire company's building committee will be on hand to answer questions. In other business, the board - . • heard a request. from Bill Holtkamp owner of the Cayuga Inn to be permitted to operate etail businesses in order to increase capital returns; The Ulysses Town Beard heard an update on'the Jacksonville water situation and heard a preliminary suggestion for a new water supply system. • listened to a report from county representative Jim Mason on his efforts to secure funding for the Summer Youth Jobs program; • received a report from Zoning Pfficer Zimet on the Association of Towns - meeting he attended on behalf of JJlysses;.and • appr6ved designation of part of the Agri -Bio property as a Business District after an additional hearing on March 1.. The integrity of the residential zone in the. surrounding area was kept intact by per- mitting only a small parcel to be re -zoned. Gasoline fou....__1. nd " in J-ville test well By FRED YAI�(V * .�; I * loumeJ Slafl . JACKSONVILLE — 0esoline was found .Niue flus week in .a ;test well 20 feet beneath,Rou46. , The new diiia*iy px"OU more ion nrobletns fol seven Y WdH 0. ed on the east shoulder of Route , '8cro39 from the suspect tanks at a gasoline $dr ice statift- Suozza has been" working with resi4,nts 'and g9vernmental dffi- ciels hying to resolve the pollution problem, which first surfaced whey four residents •discovered they had gasoline in their water wells in 1979. Those four V�ells, all along the south side of Jacksonville ROAd and ,on the east side.&F Route 96, still are polluted. A fifth well at the gas station remains; p6btW, too. . That gas station; fdrraerly owned by,che Mobil'Oil torp-, is oWped now by Richard Be g$ren f I tars and litaleci ger to resito * t secI �► :... at e gas station have cosrec} '=d periodically shack= atith ao'evi- Rollins is :.pumping gas to ' cus- tomers from � two -of three under- ground tanks, after. those ' tanks were clofed for a few= months be - See. GAS, 3A Gas (Continued from Page 1A)' The cleanup probably would en - cause a former lessee didn't have tail two pumping setups, one to gas to pump. take the gasoline out of the ground -A th th eto remove water that "We're not letting them PUMP out of -one of the tanks, because there's water in .that tank," Suozzo said.; "We want to clean up that tank before we re -open it. ,But to the. best of my knowledge, and from. what Mobil tells us, the three tanks have been checked and are Suozzo said he. was writing to Mobil officials this week, to inform them of cleanup operations. "The state will ' go ahead and. do the cleanup,. whether Mobil wants to -do it or not. We would then seek re- imbursement from Mobil." No price tag has been placed on the cleanup. e o . Ithaca Journal March 20, 1986 ar has dissolved gas in it. The cleanup also could include some .excavation work at. the gas station. "We're not sure yet, but, that may. be needed,". Suozzo added. Benzene — a known carcinogen and two other chemicals — to- luene and xylene are the major toxic culprits in gasoline.' Benzene levels in excess of state standards have been found in Jacksonville. ' Suozzo would like to get -the cleanup started this spring. "It will be done soon," he said. 71 Ni Jacksoi ii1k awaits test 'resultsagain By GMI JACKS0 . LE—Residents in the hamlet of Jacksonville continue to be frustrated..in•t1eir quest for an answer to the .p oblemi:witii the underground water'p ly t wits affected by a gas leak in•'1979. A-peiidon has been cir- culated that m lb he pristo ,the Ulysses'Tnwn Board seeking a "speedy acid• firtal. resolution to,the .problem, of gasoline-infiliraiidn." The residents agree they have -waited . Iong 'enough-4nd• are waiting for yet . another round of 'tests.. of wells to determine the ' amount of gasoline seepage into the water supply, the in- stallation of a reeovery well ,aysteat promised by representatives fFpm the Mobil is waiting for the- requeat to be written before if replies, but"Suozzo assured. ody�y.�Pubfications that he wit :contiotie to press #or inatslatob -of .a recover► well tbla atzmmer to bg6':refnavl. of the gis,664" eioo t -he .ground. eia* jt Wim. to 6r.. P,61 1 c water NO the;e has shed Ob"ce .''the was aban ziYetl dui to its highT ost. Trumausburg Free Press April 9, 1986 Town Supervisor Martin Luster has' contacted' the 'Commissioner of the DEC about -the availability of programs and providing - assistance with plans to establish a limited water district for aii area that might include less than 40 homes. He feels there is support among the residents. He said. "It's important that we start doing sd'naet.g meaningful, because -it's the only way Jacksonville can survive." He also • cited concerns with. the possible ' health hazards emanating from' the contamination and the economic hardship .experienced by residents hoping to sell their. homes. "The only thing that will resolve the situation is to provide a•water system;" he added, He presented a proposal to the Ulysses Town Board on April .9 to identify potential sources of water and retain the services of a professional engineer to facilitate all the necessary studies. Tom Suozzo, the DEC represen- . tative working on the Jacksonville proialem said he has asked Mobil to sampie the •14 -homes in"th core area wit)iin the' next two ..weeks. Mobil is waiting for the request to be written beffore it replies, * iwt Suo zo assured Odyssey PublOpotiens that he will con- t3}xte t{� i, press for • mstAati" of a "f;ee-product" was fovuid }zi the test wet) '16tated •in front of john Kraft's h6use ' within,, the ' last two weeks. "That's an indication that something as Continued on backp age From page needed. But it's a formal process." Suozzo says the state will -underwrite the coals of the clean-up and bill Mobil if nec!49ary. He is also asking for a r.pott" that would detail and asap the area Affected by - the :gasojline . in- filtration; This report V.ouid "delineate the problem :and indicate pump raI ". He sees it as a necessary tool far people to :use iii .order to main - "John „Andersson( i];ector of Ea- -vironmenfal Heiffibt or. Tompkins ouhty, findlittle to add; indicating he wa's�9iQ�fttl.::r�?�; 4f testitf8 would be undertaken soon. "We are still recommending the town continue to pursue a source of water" for the area. and would like_ to see some test drilling undertaken to identify those sources. He encourages residents to continue to pressure* the "town board to act. At the March meeting of the town board, Tom Reith was charged to set up a meeting of residents under the auspices of the Jacksonville Com- munity Association and in his capacity as a board member," to ascertain the amount of. support in Jacks,onville: for participation in a wat&district. While no meeting has been organized with residents, Reitz indicated he had ap- proached some residents to serve on a committee: He said Bill Houseworth would represent "the ;interests" of,,the Jacksonville Community Methodist Church and Dennis .O'Neil would speak for the business interests in the area. Other_Tesidents who prefer to remain anonymous will also meet with the 'committee at a date *so far 'un specified. Reitz •says there is "a whole spec- trum of problems in the area" and he wants to check all the parameters,. in- cluding:the remote possibility of village status for Jacksonville and the funding for an, independent water district, such . as that in: the Yellow Barn Road area in the Town of"P*4iPe He wants more facts and figures and information on bulk storage .tanks in the area. "I'm trying to form:Vlate ideas to give'to the . town •board,". fie said.. lie will ask- the • board to 'fund attendance at a course ,on. water sources to be. given at.Cc well this " summer for someone from . the area. Patty -O'Neil lies lived -wftfi tate problem. for • over seven-arid-a=half years. Shesimply* said, "We thought Mobil would -do something tk .ore this." ' Her husband, Dennis, ade4, "'What ado •itf#iler people do in''this situation?" t the6r fetid ,4 "suc :as Esther Hughes �'stt a still . gating io be given results water sam.q-lests •taken recently. All agreed ._ ieir frustration'level is riding high" andlliat the time for action is ripe; sprin4 Tun - off serves to make the probletn' inose noticeable. WO N XV -104 'ed", ldt-Vly� llw� studiei ar*O weded By GERI SPEICFI ULYSSES—A number of residents filled the town hall at the April 8 meeting of the Ulysses Town Board to- demonstrate their concern with the continued problems associated .with 4he -quality of the water in Jacksonville. Most of the residents from Jacksonville who attended the -meeting addressed the board. and asked for help in alleviating the problems of gasoline contamination in the groundwater supply that feeds their wells. A petition cu�`,i�ng 22 signatures of those residents affected most '`drastically by the contamination _was presented by Dennis O'Neil. He said he'had asked only 22 to sign acid all had -readily agreed. "I can get more," =he said. " *'need your- help in any way that you can give it." That statement appeared to open the floodgatesfor comments ,from the general audience. Clayton Luce ideniified himself as, "one of the vic- titi$:" He joined with other residents in assuring the town .board there was support behind them' in their ileei�lop to pursue a small water district to 'serve the R�se�fis the problem. More help has come fromthe Deer tmeitt of l✓nyironniental . • Conservation, {DEC) that proposes a recovery well system be:installed ihii I spin - mer with plans to bill the Mobil Qil'Oorp. for the cpgt. Councilman Reitz suggested tapping into local ex- perts for help with the problem and to identify wells that could be used as water ti~Qurces. Detnny O'Neil em- phatically disagreed with oily such delays "What we need is concrete action --no more studies. Your own health department has said put in a water district." The board discussed the advisability. of hiring the • engineers and agreed to - Luster.'.s proposal to expend $2,500 of federal revenue sharing funds. Tompkins County Representative James Mason said the county may be able to provide sortie funding for the project. A further report is expected at the next me.eting of the town board. Local residents are.also awaiting results .of tests of well water supplies to be taken shortly under the auspices of DEC and the Mobil Corporation. The board was given a report on the 1985 audit con- ducted by a Iocal accounting firm. The report in- dicated no major problems are. apparent,jnd that the new bookkeeping system seems to be working to the satisfaction of the town. • area. Supervisor buster asked .the board to appropriate fund to hire an engineer.to ascertain the location of local water supplies. and to study the feasibility of using any so identified to supply a water district. Luster also indicated the board would-be "starting from scratch on a scaled-down bases." In limiting the scope of the water.'district to provide only drinking water, and not water for fire protection, and in limiting the numbers of homes to be serviced, the board hopes to make the district • affordable for -the people in Jacksonville. It -was an emotional meeting, but one the board had previously indicated was necessary. Luster spoke for.; the board when he said, "The last action we' took was to 'ask the Jacksonville community to mobilize -and demonstrate interest: The board must be responsive to 'what we hear." MoreTesidents spoke up. Patty O'Neil spoke movingly. "We've been dealing with this problem for seven:and-a-half years and someone has got to do something for us! Penny Fearon added, "I have small children. I -am in favor of a water district. We live in the same town as .you. Doesn't it bother you? It's outrageous to me that you wouldn't pass a water district." Jodi Mar- shall said the proposal made last year left everyone, residents included, shell-shocked. She is in favor of a water district, and said, ."I don't know how anybody without any type of conscience can't do something." Both the.O'Neils said they'had dealt with, the Mobil company for Years in terms of legal action. They poin- ted out that gasoline wasn't biodegradeable and was not a problem •tliht would simply disappear. Denny O'Neil said statistics show it to be carcinogenic. John Kraft, whose property contains a test well that recently contained free-floating gasoline, said, "we can't .go on like this." He says the problem dates back "even fur- ther; to 1970. The full extent of the contamination was only realized after another Ieak in 1979 was identified by the Health Department. And many agreed that the Health Department had been lax in following up on Continued on back page . ' Trumansburg Free Press April 16, 1986 Ir - #Vol '"ok 4- TaAker accid6at,poses more ULYSSES—Thrp4tis_or t4OjjO:e corttgr ipa!ion to the water and-9js_qrfaceo%'qooe .again_J PU_4"town haS,9­4PP"I_with skrffihq-pr6blqMs in-th hazh et of JacksbriAllt.'. A g4solifie- tank -'truck-,,'. overturned on Route' L'§�"near the intersection of AaJteyville Road early Saturday morning spilling -an 656 mated 3,500 gallons of gasoline.. I Slippery road conditions contributed to the cause .of ;the accident and the driver, Waldo S. Smiih' of the Sav cry Energy Company, was ticketed for driving at an soil 'problems speed,. He. wE lulyss�es fted. ;relu rom. _an;!-eTq- er__gemY ca".for the Tru ns�ur Deparinentl-'�He alerted other mere r0 re company_.'4nd Dick Durling, Assistant Fire Chief was on the §_ce e shortly to take ' n charge., He; ordered an immediate evacuation of the nearby area; 4l;6ui, 50 residents friends or at the fire station. found shelter with From a command post set up at Maguire Ford, plans were made to close Route 96 to traffic north of Jacksonville to the Village of _Trumansburg line. Traf- fic was re-routed for about 15 hours while crews worked to contain the spill:, Environmental Conser- vation officer Marvin M6bbs contacted the Oil Spill] Bureau in the Department of Environmental Conser- vation (DEC) and Regiona]'Coordinator Tom Suozzo was on the scene before sunrise. The actual cleaD-up of the gasoline was undertaken Trumansburg Free Press April 16, 1986 Continued on backpage Y -F �ip..3y�::x' =,j,. [ I/., I 'A.?i�i'�N.."r r.•"•-,'J•.i�_�. ::�, 3Z its, r tl • + 'max' �: fr • � �` e -r.: �.. -.-..�::; . �€ a�..�:,,�.'` eep�i ••.�i... gi. ''f' :�' ''� I+ - 4 it G 'rwd u`: •� ' r,: �+ .lit F..w. - _ tiJ. r .:i.: .;'>�. � ;',�• j. S' V RAJ ik z - - h - :a • �n:�r , � .. �;;�: ,.�:'� fir;°:'=��;�._�,•„ ■� • r e r r• r r r r Frarm page. T Tanker - by the Environmental Oil Corporation of Syracuse. Foam was applied to minimize the danger of explosion and absorbant pads were used to mop up the area: In order to minimize the arttbunt of pollution, some dirt was excavated and water was continually skimmed from the waters of T'aughannock Creek. The area was also flushed by tank -loads of water which were dum- ped along the side of the ditch where the gasoline seeped. The actual clean-up of, the gasoline was undertaken by the Environmental Oil Cor- poration. from Syracuse. Durling assures residents, "The Environmental Oil Corporation will be dabbing up gas for about two weeks. Dirt samples were taken (Monday) to decide the amount of work necessary." The assistance of 'fire companies from Interlaken, Enfield and Mecklenburg was invaluable, according to Fire Chief Mark Vann. He added, "The damp night and heavy air, as well as the cool morning, kept the vaporization low." What might have resulted in tragedy was avoided as a result of training of firefighters to deal with such an emergency, he said: "The complete cleanup may take up to a month," said DEC representative Suozza. Trumansburg Free Press April 16, 1986 VA DEC to clean up JV pollution By FREo. YAWN *Uakd Skff The state's Department of Env!. ronmental Conservation - is ex- Pected,to initiate a cleanup op �io`n for ' Jacksouvilie's polluted water this spring and to charge Mo- bil OiT•Corp, for its cost, a rep- resentative of the Jacksonvnle Community Association'said. The representative, • Thomas Reitz, has been 'active for many tiYeoanrs o8 to help find a resolu- the which began Pollution problem, any months, formally informed Mobil last week that the state will sak- r imbursement for the cleanu operation. ` Y.,.,_- __.._ P Efforts to contact Mobil officials Monday afternoon were unsuccess. ful. No one has estimated the cost of the cleanup. . Suc 's cleanup plan asks . Mo. bi7 to: the area Of Pvll ed water, eradicatet as Possible; 's wells to be Water w • Cominssion a hydrogeolognst ells . four private to .do a complete study of the af- homes and another at the pollution fected area, so that future site, a gasolinewell , station on Route 96 sources and drilling sites would be at the intersection with Jacksonville safe and reliable;d ai Road, arepolluted. The gas station • Provide a,perma, nent, clean wa- n on the west side of Route 96 ter suPP1y ' for the homes that are while the four private homes are lo- affected by the polluted..water. cated on the south side of Jackson- Suozzo emphasized that Mobil yille Road and east of Route 96. �l be asked to pay for 41 three Gasoline was detected in those conditions. wells in ]979. -The source was pin.* At 7:30 p.m. today at Uly es Pointed• as a faulty undergrouruss nd Town Hall in Tmansburg, R t, tank coupling at the gas station. Lqysses town officials and rep- and leased the station's tanks resentatives of the DEC wiIl'mep- and Pumps and had .. franchise to discuss the'situation. The public et agreement with the former own, is invited. the laic Roger Wright. owner, current The Ulysses town board has au - owner in Richard Berggren. � thorized Hunt Engineers of Fainted The three gas tanks at the service post to do a study of potential wa- station have been monitored, and. ter sources in the Jacksonville area most recently, the 'DEC has de. � a. l.0oo-foot .radius a the tested water in one of the tanks. tion. . Thai tank has been closed, "There are about b wells within! Thomas Suozzo, a cleanup spe- that area, cialist with the DEC who which includes about 80 has dealt (percent) to 90 percent of the wells With the Jacksonville problem for in the hamlet of Jacksonvine," Reitz said, Ithaca Journal Tuesday, April 22, 1986 WO Gasoline leak sh71 haunts Hoosick Falls .� AAARY ESC>•I . .HOOSIqK FALLS{AP) — The peculiar odor. -still scents tile Wngtime bre ie oat Nixon and Willow streets, a yegr after residents first noticed A " Ve -thought`-it was a 'skunk" at fim — it smelled like there was a whole nest, .bf them," said -Ann 16, zell, " The smell would wake you up at -night." It'turaed. opt 'that 7,20Q Vd6ns of gasoline hail leaked into • the ground froiji a rusted tank at the and of'the dead4md streets, in a storage yard- of The Oil Co., owned by Paul LaPorie. As the fumes intenstfied -in the heat and dampness • of sun�imer, residents .of the neighborhood, ttiost of them older people who've spent a lifetime here, started having heates; nosebleeds, nausea. !'The. monitoiiag and meetings' went air all sum- mer;" said Idliss• BrateIl. "And as the summer went on, that smell was just. horrible." • • . One day last lNovetaber, state health• tend environ.; mental • officials •advised the Brazell sisters and their neighbors to, leave their homes — perhaps for good. "I just sat down and cried," said Ann BrazeIl's•sis- ter, Bernice.' Ten hones wear the gds spill were evacuated, the residents paused ii the Paradise Motel in nearby Ben- nington, V.t.; at the expense of UPorte's insurer, Traveler$ insurance Co. After paying $100,000 in re- locaiiolb eitpsnses, Travelers stopped sending checks at the end gf'Ja%utsry, and the Brazellsand another €am- ily moved back home despite the riauseating, odor lin-. Seting oatsitie. - "This is th.6-family homestead —we grew up here," said' -who fives. with'her sisters in the Nixon 'Street 1(;iise where their family has been for 100 years. Or* i1stei• Nita' and Y were born right in this " house,said-Ann. "So was our mother. our cousin,. Rita Cavanaugh, .lives across the street. Our • cousin Nancy bflicoll is at the end of the street. It's a -close- knit neighborhood, everyone's been. here aaff their HV- es. w es. Wohblp.each other, check.each other's houses dur- ing vacations, h. pout when someone's sick. It's like a big family -,--and pow ,sOmething, like this happens and the neighborhood's just broken apart" The spill ln'ihis village of 3,500 in the hills near Ver- mont is hardly an isolated incident. • cr2The.. r9blem of gasoling.leaks has becoming ia- - y ;.urgent in recent years, • as thousands of tanks installed -I the 50s• and 60s have begun to rust away..In',1994; 21• fast Mes in Deer Park on Long Is- land were %iced to abandon their homes when,aleak- ing gas tank' poisoned the groundwater. ' Prow lncetow% mass., .on •thb tip of Cape- Cod, has spent more than ;$3 million so far to •claanse its. water after gasoliii leaked from a service station in 1977. The New York. state Department of Environmental Conservation.,estimates . at least 20.p'ercent- of•'the state's 130,000 underground gas tanks are ,leaking; more •than 3,500 spills or leaks were reported -in the NabdAwiflc,there are 1.5 million to • 10 million. un- dergr.q&�.d -tanks containing petroleum products or hazardops bhemicais, 'and an 'estianated 1x0,000 to 400,000 ale thought -to be leaking,. actor -ding .to the 'New England Interstate Water POIlutiOII Control ^-- - _- Ithaca. Journal 'The leeks, which increase as, days -and years go by, threaten groundwater.supplies, crops, soil, homes and health., Gasoline is stored at car rental companies, marinas, farms, apartment complexes and other. businesses in addition to gas stations. It's so commonplace that it =rseem innocuous -compared to, say, pesticides. But gasoline contains as many as 1,200 compounds, some of which -have been found to cause cancer,' !tad poi- soning; kidney disease, nervous system (&otd s and. anemia. ; The federal Environmental Protection Agency was directed to develop reg tions 'for undevgronild'stor- age of petroleum and hazardous substances lay:a 1984 amendment • to the Resoufte-eonservOcil aad'0ecov- ery Act. But it is a complex f4d slow process. As , a fust step in that ArdI*s; . bfta rs of under- ground tanks are required' #dd notification fo n$ to their state regulatory agencies by •lt�iay' 8, •for .a na- tional census. The EPA regulations for new and existing storage tanks,'including provisibns for leak.detection, mainte- i�ance, corrective action, re requirements and criteria states must meet to have their own programs approved in lieu of federal regulations, .are not ex- pected to be -finalized until 1988. In the xM- eantime, most state's .have taken steps - to, deal with the problem ' -on their own, although pro- grams vary widely.-' In New York, which has one of the mQst'compre- hensive programs dealing with both new anti 6dsting above and below ground petroleum tanks,, .bvmgs of .tanks must register them by the ead of this year. They must pay a"registration fee of $50 to $250, good for five years. Within a- year of registration; taWu more r than l0 years:old must be tested far leaks; newer tacks must be tested -by the time they are 10 years old, and thea every five Yeats. -Tanks 'that • don't pass testing must be replaced, repaired'or •emptied and sealed. - About 2,000 gas stations, mainly smaller volume operations, are expected to go out of business over fhe next ffve years xather than spend -the money to: comply with New York state regulations, said 110a Benton, ex- ecutive director of the 430 -member Ciasoline'Retailers Association of Northeastern New York-. ' "First, the testing is costly —about $500 per tank" at a gas station, Benton said. It will cost a medium to large service station about $60,000 to $160,000 to re- place its tanks with systems that meet the new stan- dards, he said. `.`-However, once. that investment's made, those tanks will last at Imit.30 years.". '`The regulations ate strict, but they're necessary," said. Benton. but. tied new 'regalWoi ns come too late for the resi- dents of Nixon Street in Hoosick Falls. The skunk odor still -wafts around the little clapboard homes, mostly vacant, and the cleanup is expected to take at least -a year. After a. year of anxiety, however, the Brazens and their neighbors recently ieceived some good news. - Following months of negotiations, Travellers and LaPorte . agreed to a $1.6 million out-of-court set- tlement oa April 17, yl;lud*g $642,000 to the state: for cleanup and $W 00q 1n gompensat on for the 30 residents affected. "It's finally .over," said Ann Brazell. "It's been a very long ord_esl." Saturday, April 26, 1986 Ulysses hires Corning firm to seek water so* nrces By GFM SPOCH ULYSSES—The Ulysses Town Board • heard a familiar refrain as residents from Sacksonvfile .once again filled the room for a special meeting of the board to consider -the needsfor a water district in their area. The April 22 meeting was also attended by Bob.Aunt, an engineer from a Corning firm that provided data for the . previous water district proposals, - and John Andersson, director of TcImpkins County Environ- mental Health department. The board passed a resoldtion to hire•Hunt'slu-m to make preliminary investigations of possible water sources for a water district that would serve the im- mediate area in Jacksonvilbe :; now afflicted with problems of contamination ' by gasoline bypioducts from a leak of gasoline at a near by gas -station. The general• area to.. be served would include homes previously identified with. affected wells, plus' a reasonable buffer zone, approximately I.00o feet from the station. Hunt said lie was again concerned with -the cast of improvements but was hopeful that a local source would reduce the costs associated with a water district. He will perform some initial yield tests to determine sources and address the needs for storage of water in order to meet peak'flow needs. Some coordination of effo vKr`ll >saiade by some of the agencies now inyolved-in ' *search for a solution to the cont amin0tion..�f;,=9Mu#dWater sup- plies. A preliminary meeting Was: letvveen Dunt,. Andersson 'an -d ... T'om •Suoz�s, $egi'dii pill Coor- dinator for the Department of Environmental •Conser- vation -(DEC.). It is possible Haat s6" monies M ', be available throuii; funds of the 1Q31 Spill aur ie DEC now has more leeway. to :assist `the.tire fvitfi its problem's. Andersson pledged to be more active ip-tt3e search for relief %r the 'residents of Jacksonarlleti saiiti the Health Department "promotes• .a: cpataivatje:icYe system'.' for water- supply,-Admittrng,venit •. really accomplished much in seven years, r � . • s added, "without the local push thing,ri't going to gpi done very fast.." The town board,vassed anothe Atsplttti}on asking the. Health -Department to perfr 9� e`t0-house survey .16 the target area st}irfxmiadun,lcsamville. .Anderson said he •leas a fora% 6 �ise,f6r. cii ;t survey and that field wo k should be sla ,i ri hih. the next few weeks. Homes in the area.iKill be tsited in order .to survey ' water supply systems and injt in par - Trumansburg Free Press April 30, 1986 Continued on page.24 ' From *age Waater, ticipation in a water district. Andersson said the sur'- - veyvrs would also try to inspect the types of water systems currently .in use in :homes and the amount of contarninanats 16-aft6t. the quality of the water. Residents who attendedthe meeting voiced concerns over the release :of..i €formti tion•on a letter sent from 5auzza's office {DEC) to the Mobil Oil Corporation requesting additional. groundwater investigation and remediation of the gasoline 'contamination. The letter did .not indicate that Mobil would pay for the clean- up. It asked Mobil to install a recovery well; to identify the extent of the hydrocarbon plume and report the findings of a certifie&-hydrogeologist; and to submit a proposal for "supplying the four homes and the Jacksonville Service Station with a permanent clean water supply" Hoer the area will be visited in order o s ey wafer supply systems and interest .111.,par i ipation in a water t ish ict. Residents -asked .the board to correct the misinter- proation -that l Mobil would thus pay for costs of a � ater::district.'Dennis O'Neil questioned the quotes at- . tributeti:councilman Tom Reitz. Reit' replied; " I uon-t,,' cbftnment on the article:" O'Nei3 printed out'°t�ie:;wortling of the letter specifically said the DEC; wdbid make sure such work was performed, billing MgNj.,, f,necessary. Hut that in no way indicated financial help with- a Lwaier district would be forth- coming froih..N[obi7. Reitz offered to write a letter of ,correction. O'Neil..;added, "The -burden and responsibility shoul& be'spread aver the entire township." Many resideiirs; ;expressed concern over the resale value of theirhomi s.ibo titeprpbability that the contamination woul&spr d . further. T:Qwn 5i4pervisar Martin Luster said any decision would' ultiriWeiy-beflue '1 based on a "dollar -and -cents basis." he board -will Pitt the problem on its agenda for the may 13 regular town board meeting. - Groton company hired to clean up �- jmvd'*le gasoline leak By FRED YARN Joun d Staff JACKSONVILLE — Empire Soils of Gro- ton has been hired by the state's Department of Environmental Conseivation to clean up the seven-year old gasoline leak that has tainted many water wells here and stymied residents -Who have looked desperately for a solution to the problem, according to Martin Luster, Ulysses town supervisor. No date has yet been sgt for the cleanup's start, but Luster said it would be soon. Luster added that he has also been told that Mobil Oil Corp., which is being held re- sponsible by the DEC for the leak, has re- fused to pay for the cleanup. That means that in all likelihood the state will have to take Mobil to court to get re- imbursement for the cleanup, Luster added. The leak's source was a faulty under. ground tank coupling which allowed gasoline to flow into aquifers running under -a Baso. line station at the intersection of Jacksonville Road and Route 96. At the time of the leak, in 1979, Mobil was leasing the station's tanks and pumps and had a franchise agreement with the former owner, -the late Roger Wright. Mobil never actually owned the station. The current own- er is Richard Berggren. The station has since been closed and re- opened, and there have been no rec curences of the gas leaks, although one of she three tanks at the station has been closed and is be- ing tested soon. Water has been found in that tank, and DEC oil spill engineer Thomas Ithaca Journal May 14, 1986 Suozzo, who has been working on the Jack- sonville case for many months, wants to check the tank for leaks. Empire Soils has been hired to do a hydro - geological study of the area, to determine just where gasoline might still be lingering; also, Empire will construct a monitoring well and. then a recovery well, to draw as much "prod- uct" (gasoline or water contaminated with gasoline) as possible. Luster added that a new water quality sam- pling of several residences that were checked last summer is expected soon. Also, he said the Tompkins. County Health Department is doing a door-to-door survey in Jacksonville, asking residents if they want a Jacksonville water district. Such a district would provide only drinking water, not fire protection water or water for commercial in- terests. Luster said that a ."drinking water only" water district would'have several advantages over a regular district. "We could look for a water source closer to Jacksonville than Tru- mansburg, and we could use smaller main pipelines." A motion to create a Jacksonville water district,- offered before the Ulysses town board a year ago by Luster, was withdrawn by Luster when it became obvious that resi- dents would defeat it in a referendum because of what they believed were excessive -.costs. That district was going to hook onto the vil- lage of Trumansburg water system. -3.'. � _�":. .. ::�, .`x r.:v'1.:.. ';+-``-:�' .�:-�:_ ••�.�1y�-'ter. + eti: 3. •• .. ... - ._ 'e. -97r- . r - w.• .. _3.Jf7q.'4h•:c".3?i�'litii76 erupted.'with be~.,fy.buighter 'as he:0lt3WC -rzad ingmoticelast Week-weekassAie& -valuebf.kiis'combination egarting gw& stare and-h4me.had.been douhietl l}aven't-done anything., ' Here. But woul, y u;piq $30,000 for a place where you can't drink the water?," roared O'Neil with.more than a tint of inctedu3uus- ness in his �oiee. O'Neil and his wife, Patty, run the store from the front of their home not faiF from the' Jacksonville'Service Station. The store's lo- cation is hardly worth noting unless you keep track of doings in this Tompkins, -County hamlet that straddles Route 98 and serves as a commuter waystation for most of the 4,8W residents who work in Ithaca to the south or Trumansburg to the north. . It was March 1979 — no one 'knows the exact date — when the'O'Nells and four oiler nearby families found that their drink- warersmee' ase n'xser raaap an a sem-: ingly-wdleas strssggfe-Vtt3i`p ii s, staff = atm dattnty heaitlietllei'.tawn rest= �. .fid Mobfl coma`=' While they U68';;i .Preciate;-heaftb�f s;x�s rust �pa� and the.. ....p��`lingera3i�baaemetuC tlaixipn; :::� -mobil supplied g", 0 anis service station when• tilt contaminaiaan wD discovered. A leaky underground fuelline was bkamedand replaced. No one knoroas hove many gallons of gas seeped into the under. ground water -supply that -feeds the;private wells of each residence. hiut.as state.17epertr mentof E nvira mental Conservation ofi'ir al Thomas Suo=put it, "It doesn't take.a. lot of gas to do a lot of damage ". The problem has been compounded by the fact that an underground tank at the service station may also have discharged gasoline after Mobil sold the station following the' t 1979leak- As such, Mobil has informed the l of. hope to those-residentsmM cantsaminatO - 3 wells and town .offtcials� seeking: s:'.solutior�,, Re-lenotified.iownofficialalbatstate mm*� -, is available for the cleanup andhasw%lered a . series of tem .scheduled -to be& this week that will determine theextentof the spill and identify its boundaries. Tests last year. showed traces of. gasoline byproducts. -�­ some of them caarcinogens --- in the welke of about 15 residences. Su=o said his agency will'see-the prob.' tem to its end and let -the state- and -Maims argue. afterwards over' the firm's financial. liability in the matter. Several of the effected property owners, includingthe O'Neils;'have filed lawsuits against MobiL They are pend.' Ing in court, "Those people have been more Mian' pa - and theirhome Ott filtering ldt :useable but nc .bulkry. filtering-systeins that.tleaaskhe tafrfted water with a number of chemlegliQ 'It's the second time the Krafts have had a well contaminated by gasoline from the ser- vice station. Mobil gave them $1,100 to drill a riew well after gasoline from an urid"ergmund . tank seeped into, their drinking water ins 1971, they said. "For the sake of someone ina]ting a dollar, . We`_ve got all of our property poi3uted. We don't blame anybody but we just think this _should hage been cleared up a long time ago. All we want is decentdrinking water," said Anna Kraft, who suffers with arthritis along with her husband, a retired plumber. Herald American Sunday, May 11, 1986 -aervloe LUS -`Mie people Who spoke are those who 'pose any. form of control over.th lives ...(but) we had to assume they rep rented -the majority. -because: they attezns the meeting and spal;",.said Luster. -v took over town reins is '1999 Tine pian would have cost the 125 hon owners In the special- rooster district abc $350 8 year while town residents outs4d ,l district would have had. to . pay abort. yearly,. Luster said. ® GAS, page _4. Wnitor wetltcontracted for Jacluonvilie sites ByrSPEICx LyLYSSES—Once again the issues concerning the water supply foirithe harslet bf Jacksonville dominated the town board agenda.for Ulyssesas they met bp;May, 13. Town ,-Superiisor Martin Luster reported' ;o.. ;lie board on the progress so far and Bob Hunt; repreen- ting Hunt Engineering who has been hired by the town to conduct preliminary 'studies, was in attendance. As one aresoot.:put it, "We want-to.j e the dirk fly;" ;in rdete#0 fo the immediate ,need for 1�elief from the wader contaminatnan tit contingettto- plague the area. Luster reported .on the contracting with Empire Soils of Groton by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to drop om'tor wells -inorder to clearly define sites where m ere recovery wells can be drilled to start the clean-up process of the gasoline that currently contaminates some of the water supply in Jackson- ville. DEC :contracted with• the. firm and will seek reimbursement fioni Mobile Oil Corporation in a con- tinuation of the battle to make Mobil accept respon- sibility for the,contamination caused. by a leak in a coupling at the gas station seven years ago when Mobil was supplying the station. Hunt outlined•tite phases of his operation and ap- proximate costs. The board met in'special session on May 20 to determine how much it can feasibly.afford to authorize. Hunt Engineering is currently reviewing all data and identifying probable sources for a water supple -system. Phase "II of the -project would include drilling test wells to check farquality atkd .quantity of flow. The location of any such wells will determine the cost of thematerdistrict to area residents. Hunt said, "Given the.best of all worlds, we'll have results in a few months.' -We're still looking to 1986 for .:a system:" A number of Jacksonville residents. 'tten- ded-the meeting and indicated their continued supp'drt for a project. As one residem, put it, ""We want to see the dirt fly," in reference to the immediate need for relief from the..water contamination that continues to .plague the area. In a. related matter., the, •board voted to withdraw auth�azation for To...Councilman Tom Reitz to at- tend a' seminar at I Cornell on local groundwater managnent. The board felt 'the expense of 'U85 was unwarranted as the town has hired experts to deal. with the.problertis. "Bob Weatherby. said, "We're hereto try to decide how to spendtaxpayer's money." The board felt any such monies should be set aside until the Town receives further cost 'estimates. from the engineering firm. 'The board also 'responded to a - .petition from Jacksonville residents concerning parking near Jacksonville Road,- where it intersects with Route 96. The petition requested a ""no parking zone" 'be established that would extend 100 "feet in from the state high wAy. An additional request for a sign indicating "handicapped child" will be followed through for a residence at 607 Jacksonville Road. The requests will be forwarded to the Department of Transportation in Syracuse. - .. Supervisor Luster said, the board continues • to receive complaints concerning the state detour due to reconstruction of the Frontenac *bring' e. He. has relayed the complaints to DOT but knows of no changes planned. The original time estimate given for completion of the project has been shortened. In.other.business, the board ' Continued on bg0 page . onitor listened to a short presentation on the Tompkins County Area Development Corporation; indicated approval for town participation -in the Tompkins County Job Training Program, which em- plbys youths up to 21 years of age;- heard a report on the inspection by Zoning Officer D�vid Zimet on the status .of Auble's Trailer Park; and set a date of June 2 at 7:30 p.m. to meet in joint session with the Village of Trumansburg .on matters of concern to both governments. The meeting will be held in the Village Meeting Hall. Trumansburg Free Press May 12, 1986 Tompkins County requests t ' full disclosure of * testing .Benzene detected in samples JACKSONVILLE—Citing a need- to protect- the public health of .Jacksonville residents; Johri Ander- sson, Director of Environmental Health for Tompkins County has requested the full scope and result's of geohydrological testing be made available to his office, offices of the Department of Environmental Conser- vation (DEC), the Town of Ulysses and their con- sultants. Ina letter addressed to Ton-Sunzzo of the DEC, Andersson said he believes Suozzo's request that Mobil Oil provide a permanent water supply for four homes and the gas station in Jacksonville affected by a gas leak is not "broad enough.," Andersson believes at least fifteen properties may be affected by the gasoline contamination. Once again asserting'a commitment to it community solution to the problem, Andersson said the Tompkins Continued on back page From • •- Toopkins ; County Health 'Department ,and the NYS, Health 'Department- believe thee.besi�iansw'er is to provide a communitVwater district 3o-sei i►e properties -located near the :;pathway of* Olurhe. ,.Future movement of the gasoline many%riot' be>:as.xtadily--iden- t1ftable as presumed since'thFagtrifer lies i;Y "fractured rock." . In a related matter, Ulysses -.-Town Supervisor -said the DEC has hired a firm, Empire Soils -of Groton, -to - perform . studies leading :'to• the:. installation of - a recovery, well iri Jacksonville.:.Mobilail Corp. 'will be billed by the DEC for the costs -of the gasoline clean- up. Andersson also said he has started surveying the Jacksonville area to ascertain support for .a water district. The survey is about -25% complete. Samples of untreated water show levels of contamination con- tinue to ' fluctuate. Of. four homes sampled,. one showed 217 parts per billion of benzene while -the other three levels were within accepted standards. Samples were drawn March 6. —Geri Speich Trumansburg Free Press - May 14, 1986 Progress Noted"'. On' Jacksonville Water Tro'u*bles*-, By R. SCOTT RAPP JAMONVILLE —'The current owner of a Route 96 service station, which was suspected of contamin- ating several nearby private wells in 1979, said Wedaesdayhe plans to replace the station's three .under- ground gasoline tanks.this sum- mer.. . "We've gone out to bid already. We are going to replace all of those tanks by August or earlier," said Richard Berggren, owner of the' Jacksonville Service Station' since 1984. Berggren also confirmed reports that one of the underground tanks has "had a hole in its top" for an unknown length of time. But Berg - gree said he doubts any gasoline has leaked because the tank has not been filled to capacity for many yam. At least five private_ residential wells were contaminated in 1979 when a busted fuel line at the ser- vice station was discovered to have drained an unknown quantity of gasoline into the underground water supply. •...Owners of- the affected proper. ties have been fighting since then to have the-problem,corrected, and relief may be in sight as the result of action Tuesday..night. by the Ulysses Town Board. The board ap- proved the first' stage of a three. Phase plan to insfall'a public water system for effected residents in this Tompkins County hamlet. Robert Hunt Engineers of Painted Post was hirdil to begin the investigative work..'.-. tcessary to create the water according to Town Supervisor Martin Luster. : nuriag the first phase, the firm will analyze soil and�vater tests ordefed to be iken"Iater.this mbift to determiae. the ezteat o , „thegaso"lineleak's' loins. The eng� , neeriag firm is also"i�griiTed to' draw tentative boundary lipes for `die water distrtct'8ad locate po.:, lic Rgeils, Luster said: • . ` The_ town supervisor. acknow- ' edged that -some rQeuts attend A,;4 g Tuesday"'s'i t3rig spoke.of ; air aonacins'$tidf the posaihllity mat -more gasoline has been leak- ing from the service station. Luster said tests were taken Monday at the station, but the results had not beenmade.public. . Luster said the town plans to ask the state Department of Environ- mental Conservation to require sta- tion owners to check each tank for any Ieaks before being allowed to pany more gasoline. T.contamination problem, said Luster, only magnifies itself if more gasoline has been leaking from the service station. lie also said - it would further underscore the area's need for a municipal water system. Property values have declined and health fears risen as the town has wrestled with the problem. The Town .Board withdrew a plan last year to connect Jacksonville to the village of Trumansburg's public water supply, because many resi- dents said doing so would unfairly tax a majority of townsmen. � - The proposed water district would be much smaller and less costly to install, according to Lus- ter. ' Post Standard May 22, 1986 Berggren said he bought the sta- tion with an unwritten guarantee that the tanks were new. "I thought all of this was taken care of or I never would have gotten involved. I just wish this thing could be straightened out," said Berggren; an Ithaca resident. ' ' Berggren said he is working with the DEC in the replacement of the. tanks. Ali state guidelines will be followed,.he said. Mobil Oil•Corp. supplied gasoline to the service stad6ti when the 1979 leak was discovered: The oil com- pany has' provided water cleansing systems to IS five residences, ren- dering the well water usable but ;not drinkable.:Mobil also ships bot- -tied ot•tied drinking; water to the homes. 't; ;.State and• local health officials ;are cdneemed- that the Ieak could ' contaminate Other wells jujhe area,; because the plumeinoves --frith..- a miderground Watoitln 'tests t'lasf yeari►e bF�2D Test re 1s A,- 'k at'j"L. wue _PZ iftloow J O _Mu#:...f .0tionAoitiatei a - j - - "s -company that s m- lizes 'i pe '' in n at LIO referred all C]UekiO#3 to the DEG who* contracted with -them brit cobfirOod'.the.it Continued onpage 24 From purge Teat - Jesting had, been completed and leaks were found in the middle gas tank at the Jacksonville Service Station. The 'service station is now -owned bY'Dick Berggren and leased to a fiii1fly member, Barry Rollins. Rollins confirmed the-knoWledgi of a leaky tank, but states the tank has not been filled since the station re -opened last fall. It is his understanding the tank was never f1#;d-. AMmpletely under the priviou's operation by 400e Baker -because the holes in the -top of the tank wo,%ddhave caused gas to leak into the area. Udkspnville residents have asked the operatois of - the service station to siop, selling gasoline until they are assured an tanks are leak -free. At a special Town Board meeting recently, residents reported the middle tank leaked 500 gallons of test water in a three-day period. The trumansburg Fire Department was called to deliver more -water to the service station in order for L & 0.- to be able to test a full. tank on May 19: The tank had been filled with water. in anticipation of the test on May 16. ROWS says ,he would like to install three or four -new tanks and expand services to include diesiel fuel said. In -related matters, the Ulysses Town Board ap- proved Phase I of: the contract with the Hunt En&eeflug firm taidentify boundary lines and -poten- tial*.,SouTces for a water district for the Jacksonville qeq..-7j!c firm will also analyze the. test results from Empire Soils Of Groton to determine the extent of the' gaspline contamination. The board authorized a con- tract not to exceed $1900 with Robert Hunt. .the Division of Assessment of Tompkins County is currently'StuayAnglthe effect of the water problems on the messed valuation of the homes that are affected. According to a letter addressed to the Town'of Ulysses Supervisor, Martin Luster, assessment, , reductions may be ordered as at result.. tip to 15 h9ibesmiy be af- f0cied. At •a Meeting of the Jacksonville Community watet. As 4. M UYsici Trumansburg Free Press May 28, 1986 0, Where residents gathered to 1011 cW166thing the continuing 90itz telideit'd 'bi; miggition as ib *emse - at the towWt interests it -is' in tkct'e.4 - member of, the Vu S a 111�01]i Vials vA MIZwdll well th 2404,for moo, J v rim . a iI "t- r-alld d not f6re Vdth fhi water' distridt'l said he stift b6U tiQii-for :h tion of : i tmo v 94YOWO 96t i Post Standard Wednesday, June 11, 1986 Regional DEC dire addresses Xville eater ULYSSES—Meeting before. a crowd once again, the Ulysses Town Board focused: attention . on the problems of gasoline -contaminated water.in Jackson= ville. In attendance to present up -dated information were Department of �Ebvironmental Conservation '(DEC) Oil -Spill Engineer. Torn .S.uozzo and t;tte Regional Director of DEC, William Kirichbaum. Krichbaum expressed utmost confidence in the plans established by Suozzo- in' order to remedy the water supply problem. Of, note to Jacksonville residents was Krichbaum's assurance: "We'll do all the pushing we can from this region.," was the promise. Suozzo outlined, zhe course followed to reach a satisfactory solution. Eihpiie. Sdils' itivesfigeicin of the area surrounding Jacksgaville -is ct rleptly in progress to.determine the extetmo€ the gasoline plume. If soft under t'he gas.statiori is #ounci ".-;be a. secondary some .of #tta free ga'solme gTgdu�t from. the ground - waters serving the area. Cointendin,g, there .is a "cloud over Jacksorivint,'. Suozzo expressed the opinion that"a municipal wvatef system is the way- to go." In a reference to the. flue tuating levels of contamination noted during tests of. the nearby. wells, :Souzzo said, "We see seasonal peaks, but there "is some residual contamination..:For years, residents in.. the- Jacksonville .:area=. ,have documented the fact that .gasoline odors. appeax strongerwhen groundwater Ievels rise. Residents expressed frustration with the .long process: the n ajor .'spill occurred,' in '1979 ,when ap- proximately 4,000 gallons of. gasoline leaked into the soil :around the "Jacksonville. service station. DEC Conan ued -an.. buck page Trumansburg Free Press June 18, 1986 From page 1 Director Krichbaum said,,'4'rA groundwater recovery system would hit right at-tlxe`heart'of-the problem." Several Jacksonville resident's expressed a -desire for the. town board -to deal directly with the problems found in the four homes originally identified as con- taminated. Penny Fearon, another .neighbor nearby, asked to be 1hCluded in any studies. Other residgrlts requested the board not overlook the needs of the fotfr' residents when considei` bg the. possi' Ie creation. of :a larger watei supply district. Speaking for the board•, Town Sup0f.v lwlarF� Zuster ex la teii.;$l e t tial steps nr� identical:: Whi J-derit�fyrng a so rtie af; water.�,for 6d hornes br .; 3argt r defined,area L EC .':represe3it�tt lies itss�tra b&id membersthat a si'rfiultaneous.search could 0?nly lie: helpful in that more water sources could le tie resulting findings. Several Jacksonvilleresidents expressed a desire for they: kown.board to deal directly with ;the problems found in -the ;four homes originally identified as contaminated. > . In related matters, wells will -be tested again when groundwaters are at similar leveis'to last summer's dry conditions to make comparable conclusions available. Other tanks at the Jacksonville station were tested for leakages and ' apparently found to be tight: The middle tank has been identified as having holes near the top. As a result of a joint meeting with the Trumansburg Village Board, the town board discussed the possibility of a joint maintenance -agreement on Pennsylvania Avenue. Annual rotation of such maintenance was the solution suggested by Town Highway Superintendent Jim Meeker. A request for a speed limit change on Pennsylvania Avenue will be referred to the Department of Trans- portation. The town board will recommend. lowering the limit to 30m.p.h. Town Supervisor Luster reported hehad written. to state officials requesting caution signs. and detour in- formation be posted on Jacksonville Road. The parking situation on Jacksonville Road was also put under consideration and a formal investigation will be authorized. In other business, -the board, • decided attendance at board meetings would be by invitation for the town attorney; • requested the -Planning Board hold hearings on subdivision regulations; and,. • received a request for funding of youth track and football programs. —Geri Speich n Ile st ies ag, of water an, gasoline * TZ lt's'sdme ziiess they have em Jkksgnville, a hamlet of maybe 50 famil}es'7 miles north ,of itiaila at the rim of the Taughaniock Falls landfall A sihell started coming out•o'f a few of the water taps seven years ago-'O'"ne family has had it for 16 ydars,. off and on' Thsmell'is of petroleum and it snakes you sick, if enough of it goes into your nose. 0.pe, of the components that smells, ben- iene, rriakes rat get cancer. Jqc Kraft Rq.ssgd out once in the shower at lzls`parents house, it was so bad. Fainted 1'ronf the'fGri}es .taf his morning bath, and drogged thToiigh .the shower curtain onto the door Z�he drafts, for that matter, have ,had #11e p'ro`blem since 1870, according to .nd it•r mains after all.that time. It aoesn%seem to budge under the pressure of a very fat group of studies and thousands and'thousands of dollars brought to Jack- sonville in'tests, quick fixes and man-hours of -word by public employees: A cup, of cool water from the faucet in Denni6VXeil's kitchen —he is a neighbor of the Krafts — still tastes like a cup o f Cool lighter fuel, if you'd dare drink.it, which the O'Neil_ don't This is year eight, they're into..• The Kraft house is.kitty-corner across the Trumansburg Road .(Route 96) from _Jack- sonville Service Center, which -used to be the Mobil station in Jacksonville. It .was Mobil in.1979 when the problem was stated in a very serious way. That;was in March, at the spring thaw. Dennis O'Neil called the Tompkins County Health Department to say he had a gasoline odor -in his water supply, from the weill he'd dug -in his yard. Also in the storm sewer nearby. Dennis and his wife Patty run Jacksonville Tackle and Bait mi .the old church thatused to be Jacksonville's=`town ball." They had. moved there six years be- fore their water went bad. A health worker called .the county fire �d disaster coordinator's office; where -he was toldas much as.4,000 gallons of gasp - line may have been F�lehsed auto the.atonizi drain This set off calls < the fire deart- ment, the state vontnei� Conserva- tion and Transpoi tafan e ' e a�nl others who.might..be inte_te;..set'ndjeum .�. x.;.:... res ings dawn the f fns o Tuuses right away. No explosive 'aYiiiigs were found but the "odor'Qfgaso}ine"f ri!asnotati; Now, as the land slopes e, in Jacksonville, there is the.Kraft acthen the 124,11 Hughes house, which next to a vacant 1'6t before you get to the oXd church, where the O'Neils have'their l;hy in the front end.of the buildiijg; and acme at the back. Clay- ton Luce and his family live next door to the O'Neils. In time, it would be found that all -of the wells on those four properties had been contaminated by the spill. As the months passed, the peaks and valleys of this awe- some "plume" could be charted in other Wells in Jacksonville too. There is a frightening chemistry at work here. It takes only one gallon of gasoline or fuel oil to make one million gallons of groundwater unsafe to drink. That, would fill four average -size swimming pools. Fed- eral experts figure there are 3 to 5 million underground storage tanks in the U.S. and close to 100,000 are leaking because of .cor- rosion. Jacksonville's troubles are a tiny' dot in that murky universe. The nasty plume is down there but who can be sure how it dances through the crust .someone,decided to build Jacksonville on? There could' be hidden pockets of refined unleaded or super regular. trapped under Herald American Sunday, June 22, 1986 Route 96 waiting for the right ground swell 'to unlock them. The people •with the bad wells notice the parts per billion of hydro- carbon's goes down as the wafter table goe: down. Just now the spring. r&ns play. Witt t e.ground chemistry and the test -taker: are busy elsewhere. The plume's source, according to healtl department.documents, was Wright'., Mobil station, which in 1979 was privateb owned,. with the oil. company owning thi three 4,000 -gallon tanks buried betweei the pump. island and the highway. The ex per. found "gasoline or oil material" bub bling out of the ground near one of th, tanks when they got to the hamlet that da; in.March. When Roger Wright was asked to clos his station, he refused. He told the visitor he had reported leakage and gasoline loss t Mobil weeks before and nothing had bee done. m GASOLINE, Page C. Pic cc bo > ,a cu 0j, 9:4 fa w r cu .i -Z -7g tq cc J2 .19 Its -v C.) Q E.°0' .. a) w 0�. W'w - - g V a wo A gg P.; VDJEwi .8 CD 75 cu to I E -4-P 0*QT !I 4= -.4 0 Wi cu 8, d 1.21 > 'V. w $1 5 H w -a a � Z-9 a �R 0-0 °C j PP -4 "Q ke - _P M 07 Vw_l':,ct6 tko to C9 R. 10 '.j W..'C: o 0) d) N 'tto 0, -.0 WID 93 'Cod a; d P14 9 s to;w .:9. be" - w a, vs jo- ot -A '.rg cc 4) IZ gm..) N S a w �:g so.,Cod 0 8 V. J2 cd y to] -, tot; old C'S.3 20 to 9 W.2 .091 ut. 0 X L 3�H 40# illRA at � -0 Cts Lt,.au Z cu tto A 0 cj CU a -M 4:d Z z .4 v ma V vj 0:Vcu :01 1 4t CD -A A . ia 9 -g WIG o. � 4, ad. = = w .43 9Cd 17 a 0 Ir CIS 5 A A A CD &Q -.r CD do k, Ao -�pN s 0 Zk 'o 12. 834 Cu (u 19H cc cu .8 -a Ww B 0 .0 =0 ;;-o- A A b tl W Board Updated on well -water situation Baal water dowers needs of the residents.. Questioned. by O'Neil, Luster added tax assessments information_ .on the status of a survey conducted by- the Tompkins County By GERI SPEICH Health• Department, terming it unrelia- ULYSSES—In what continues to be a ble due to a "sixty percent _ non- long-term.,problem for the members of response rate." Tests of two remaining the Ulysses. 'Town Board and the 'resi- tanks at: Jacksonville Service Station dents of Jacksonville, the quest -for reso- showed no leaks. Concern remains over lution. to the ebntamination of well -water the status of the middle tank. O'Neil asked for further test results, It,was .also reported -ghat particularly those ordered by the DEC, asgeasnielats is the Jadi,$OuVille saying, "It seems we have a problem get- have been lo4ered for ting test results." Luster. responded, "If area .always takes a long time. You're just a several houses that have exper- neophyte dealing with: government." fenced dffiet�lties with water Luster assured firm that a "hard copy" of results is. always received eventually. supplies It was .also reported that assessments, `been in the Jacksonville area have supplies in that hamlet has at least . re- ex- lowered for several houses that have ex- 's suited .in "dirt flying," according: to perienced difficulties with water sup- plies. clue to a leak during 1978 in :a Ulysses Town' Supervisor Martin Luster. , coupling to a gas tank at the local service Paraphrasing a comment made by Jack citation. A question was raised asto the sortville .resident Dennis O'Neil at a re- responsibility of the town board tonoir- cent meeting of the town board, _Luster fy other'resi.dents of the possibility drat Provided. an update on the progress an -assessment., 'adjustment, might be " made Ib.date. available .diem.. The board had, no Representatives of .Empire Soils; a .far answer not was :the 'question addressed Groton firm -hired by the Department of concerning the iinpct of the > nvirphtnent?Ll -Conservation (DEC) +.o devaluation of property on the eeonon is Ascertain the'.extent of the. underground status of Jacksonville and: the:torvn's tax seepage of gasoline, have been '4n:the base: JaekSonvttle area , installing. —monitor --The meeting vvas a ' =- wlssreliriniiar}� reports_ indicate that;' three represenfaiives )r ,at Iea�f +�vo .sources of,water haveee dots}� Processing located t}tst could presumably serve the `Continued �. 'r Testing water levels in weds in- the Jacksonville drea;. Rqy ;Wagner of Empire SotJs-:'is. ,one of the teehntcirrns helping to prepare a repdrt .6 ii the gd$$ olive contamination in the grtiuitduraT .pwply. _, PtiReynol� •panoutalagHtA auQ!-magl.Bulpunw of OSI$ ageiane pjnom slsoa,'sanjastuagl -ms Ips aql jo uotluunueluoa luana.td malsAs alenbapB tre Ilejsup of iaun�o of aiaiauoa MIM padd= pue aatm.lsgns -auroq Cue ioq ,*a-inpaaoid anlsuad uauj uB gllnn pappi aq Him aaigl :ino; -xa UV s,11 *A&01 kMA si auljosu8 3o a1B.I paxaetu seq aH •sass�Cjn 3o umo L aql uj Iunotual teniae aq L,, 'plus OH •aurjosu8 s31uel aiipow pauopuegB so pasnun jo ut luasaid suoq=-;o siallU 4sumpeq snlsls aql uo papodai w3japauS Magog -0),pasri mou pogiow aql pauopsanb soloadsul astd' �ssamsnq iaglo ul pue ialum jo Alddns paleuctusi „•peaids . -uoaun uB aAR= snumoatuoq papa33u st saop q Ru- IpunoaS aql uI it antra[ amsse of pamojjo3 aq ppnogs lsgl sdals nOA 3r„ 'palu7alra.r aaueH "Sim IBianas paplap `uur3, aql ao; ta?LuvW p.mbq lu aauepual)v panuiluoa gagl suopwado pIa13 `aatreH a�Iry�j 'Hampug Aq tuapgoid aql of pua ue io3 paau 1pagl aie.ilsubmap oqm sluaptsas ajjlnuos)jaef aq1 jo su.raauoa aql gupssatppd •suoq rea -o.ip�iq aql anouiai of jlos aql 10 gutd" L -dugs ire ioj paau aq1 passnas;p gagjL *gluotu lad OOZ$. r Ulysses s ditiate Sneed for county h me closure Water poport details contamination By 1VMARCLACEY ULYSSES --The Ulysses Town Board decided last week not to'take a stand on the proposed closing'of the Tompkins County, Home until it receives a report from the T.ompki.ns County Board of Representatives. The Town of blysses Board and the county board both met August 12 to discuss proposals to either close or sell the county home, a county -owned home for the aged'located in Ulysses..The county board referred the matter to' 'ommittee for' further study The toren board invited County Representative James Mason (R- Ulysses Town Supervisor Martin Luster spoke . in favor .of maintainingl the services uravided by the Tompkins County Home. 'Ulysses).to present a report at -the next Ulysses board 'meeting. The town board has no.authority in. the eoun- 'ty home decision, -.but plans to recommend a solufion to the. pounty. At the town board meeting, several members of the audience opposed any change in the current operation -of 'the county home. One Ulysses resident said, "I know several people who have -spent their final days in 'the county home with dignity and a purpose:" Town board members eventually tabled a resolution expressing the -town board's "displeasure and opposi- etion" to the closure of the county home' which Town 'Of Ulysses Supervisor Martin A: Luster said represents a "tradition' and unique service to the people of Tomp= kins County." The report goes on to say, "21 of 35 water sources tested in the Jacksonville haml have in at least one analysis been -reportgq to contain some organic contamination." Town Justice Jame&E. Rice Jr. said of the possible .closure, "I think that in the past the county home has served its purpose and it can serve,its purpose in the future. Closing the county home would be a loss." The county board voted" to seek proposals from other agencies who may be interested in running the county home on a licensed basis. Board action requires all options be considered before closure is approved. A Tompkins County Health department .survey on the Jacksonville water problem recommends the Town of Ulysses consider installing public water systems and pursue funding for such a venture from outside sour- ces. The four-page .investigative report; which includes data collected between April 25 -and May 28, says that some 65 percent of local homeowners want public water supplies. The survey results were announced,by Towtt:of Ulys-ses Supervisor. Martin A. Luster "at the. meeting of the board. The report goes on to say, "21 of 35 water "sources tested in the Jacksonville. hamlet have in at least one analysis been reported to contain, some .organic con- tamination." .'Seven. sources. were reported to exceed the New York State Health Department guidelines for benzene. Continued on back page Trumansburg free Press August 20, 1986 Ulysses "it's interesting, although I'm not sure it told anybody 'anything they don't know," Luster said of the report. The report says, "The survey's goal was to Broadly evaluate the individual water systems currently. in use, some already documented to be contaminated with gasoline,, in an area which is primarily residential_ ex- cept for a post.office, service station, grocery store, and antique shop." About 160 people are served by some 57 individual water systems in the Jacksonville hamlet. , The report concludes, "Town officials and Jackson- ville residents should continue discussions about the service of public water to the.subject area. Not only should documented problems and the need Yo. find solutions for them now be addressed, but also Xhe need to evaluate the potential impact of future problems on the community as.a whole must 'be studied. That -the environment is in a dynamic anal not static state should be appreciated by everyone concerned." The report- was prepared by Director of Environ- mental Health John Andersson, Senior Sanitarian James : Morris and Cornell University student Lori Koch. Luster said .the Department of Environmental Con- servation basically wants an immediate solution to the Jacksonville problem, while the health department is seeking "a long-term, overall solution. "My im- pression;" Luster said to one resident of Jacksonville, "is that we are going to proceed with both." Gasoline seepage in water supplies began in the '74s Editor's Note. This is the first sebment of a.three- part series describing the contamination of ground- water in Jacksonville. By GERI SPEICH JACKSONVILLE—Contamination of the ground- water supplies in the hamlet of Jacksonville has been a concern to many for many years. The frustration of dealing with elected officials, company representatives and a plethora.of experts in the fields of health and en- vironmental conservation has been growing .as surely as the gasoline has been seeping through the layers of rock deep beneath the soil in the area. The first documented leak of gasoline appears to have occurred in March, 1979 when a coupling to an underground gasoline tank at the service station on Jacksonville Road and Route 96 sprang a leak. By May of 1979, John Andersson, Director of Environ- mental Health .for the.county, notified the Department of. Environmental . Conservation (DEC) of the problem, saying, "We do not believe surface waters were seriously affected, but certainly the groundwaters were contaminated and made not usable for drinking." Reports indicated as much as 4,000 gallons of gasoline may have been discharged into 'the storm drain at the service station then operated by Roger Wright as a Mobil Service Statidii. Slightly more than a cup of gasoline can destroy, -drinking Supplies forever. At tliat time, Wright refused to close the station..: or- Ttiinp the . tanks since Mobil -.:owned . the ianks;atici'haci` ars refiisea =ro; respond:ato kris repQri gas ca Within days of the incident, at least four homes were visited to check. reports of gasoline odors at the water taps in ;tile, douse or in the basements. The first round of water `tests were ordered. `H droearbons in the form- of toluene, benzene and xylene --known car- cinogens --were discovered and represented a - health hazard to people who may be` exposed. to their Continued on page 24 Trumansburg Free Press September 3, 1986 ...- Water ingestion through drinking water supplies. As the gasoline appeared intermittently in the wells and taps of the homes in Jacksonville, residents ex- perienced the 'frustration of dealing 'with several problems that continue today- The original authority designated by the State of New York to handle com- plaints of gasoline contamination was the Department of Transportation (DOT). Subsequent awareness -by. state and national Officials of possible environmental damage resin#ed in the -'authority- being -transferred to the DEC. State and county health departments were not involved- in seeking solutions to, the health problems and possible long-term effects of exposure to hydrocarbons. The initial solution suggested to the homeowners whose water supplies had been contaminated was to seek legal redress from the Mobil Oil Corporation, the Principle supplier,and owner of the leaking,tanks.- The system of justice tends to grind slowly; legal technicalities and culpability arguments enabled elec- ted officials to withdraw from the discussion.. Ap- parently, -town and county officials did not want to "muddy the waters" further; the argument was put forth that the problem was now; a civil suit to be han- dled byprivate attorneys hired by the homeowners. Each time one of the affected homeowners called and asked for further water sampling, the request was honored. But the results of the tests were not often made available to the homeowners. However, they were notified that gasoline contaminants, particularly benzene, tested at high levels. Mobil Oil Corporation then agreed to provide bottled drinking water for those homeowners. What is not clear, except to the homeowners and landowners in the surrounding area is this: gasoline has been in the water supply for awhile, possibly prior to the documented leak in 1979. The Tompkins County Department of Health has a Ietter on file dating back' to March 8, 1972 asking for information on tests ordered to ascertain if the presence of "gasoline, kerosine, or fuel oil specifically were present in the water." At meetings sponsored by the Jacksonville Community Association, residents recalled earlier incidents of gasoline spills and tanks being dug up to test for leaks as early as 1970. One resident went on record stating that leaks had been oc- curring since 1960. A state oil spill bureau did not even exist until 1978 and there was no agency to investigate such reports until then. And although the Mobil Oil Corporation has been paying for bottled water and has ordered expensive and extensive water -filtering, systems to be installed in the homes of those most af. - fected by the gasoline contamination, it has yet to ad- mit responsibility for the toxins' presence. Gas odors in JA sonville wells persist _ it, the` 1980s Editor's Note: This is the second segment of a three- part series describing the contamination of groun- dwater in Jacksonville. By GERI SP.EICH JACKSONVILLE — By 1982, the residents of this small hamlet in the Town tot Ulysses still smelled gasoline o.dors'in their houses:aud�oticed the presence of gasoline in the *titer .;that 4. ,a -a from their kitchen faucets: particularly.�atier a Heavy Fain. T04 ongoing per�pttsri s atritiuted to the uirder$nouhd gasoline seepage from a broken cbnnectioit at the local service ..c area found ?t pirricubt to'seir-.cn�etr nomesi utcier residooft and thv�e wiio had kited; all :their lives Jacksonville "started to -,beaon�e..>i<itter .andhgry that the area was being, : tagged, by � tip, va*vorable reputation. The state began to gear .Aip,-and1uTid the oil spill bureau and looked for engineers to staff it. The original gasoline problems ,:had been studied by the Department of Transportation,(DtO! since that agen- cy was then designated to iq*sppte such leaks. The local health department responded to specific requests for well sampling ' and, water tests but took little initiative, despite acknowledging Xhat:'benzene present in water supplies was known to cause cancer in humans. And officials in the Town of Ulysses referred the problem back to the residents affected, telling them to contact their lawyers who. were battling Mobil Oil Corporation in the civil courts. The company insfail6d,:carbon filter in 1984, but they were still; not operational all of the time by mid -19$5. The service station closed for awhile, but -it reopened under new management in. June,- 1984. The tanks remained in the ground. A 1981 request that Mobil Oil share test results of water samplings and an un- derground• hydrology study with local health officials was refused due to ongoing litigation. Another request was made in March 1982. The odor of gasoline was noted again in the well at the Dennis O'Neil residence in March, 1982,.and was still reported by -John Kraft in his well in January of 1984. Trumansburg Free Press September 10, 1986 by March of 1984 some town officials were apprised of.the continuation of the problem. A newly.elected town supervisor, Martin Luster, reported the con- tamination had not been removed and that'water sup- plies were still affected. Luster suggested the for- mation of a+water distinct to solve theproblem; studies and sources of both information and -financing began. 14unt. Engineering Firm was _Hired to produce. a prdIiminary feasibility. study. The town board did note the seriousness of the prpblem and made provisions to allocate.$2,500 for a study of -the problem in its 1985 budget, when it prepared the document 1984. in the fall of Despite the fact that two more years had passed and the Jacksonville 'residents- still reported gasoline in Continued on page 24 From page 1 their well water supplies, further testing appears to have been neglected until January of 1984. These tests again proved the presence of gasoline in the water. There are three major soluble constituents of gasoline that dissolve in water and move toward the water aquifer, through the underlying rock strata, once they are introduced into the ground: benzene, toluene and xylene. A request from the Tompkins County assessment office in September, 1985 asked for information on "the benzene pollution of water supplies in the Jacksonville area." The requestsuggested that assessment reductions were possible as a result. The undermining of the tax base, thus suggested, was ap- parently of little concern to town officials. Yet resi- dents worried as. they saw their property values eroding Mobil Oil Corporation continued to supply bottled water to the houses originally identified as affected by the 1979 gas leak. The company installed carbon filters in late 1984, but they were still not operational all of the time by mid -19$5. But it appeared thatfurther ac- tion would be forthcoming because local health of- ficials, town representatives and state engineers were persistently made aware of the continued problems and complaints of the homeowners. John Andersson, Director of Environmental Health for- the county, had suggested that Luster's recom= mendation for a water supply system was one way to solve the problem of contaminated water in March, 1984. He has continued to urge such a district be for- . med. Luster investigated the possibility of grant monies from the Housing and Urban Development funds. But the tanks that had leaked in the past remained in the ground, slowly rusting just like so many others in the Jacksonville area that have never been removed or even pumped free of gasoline. The service station owner declined to fill one of the tanks all the way to the top because of .a hole located near the rim that would let gasoline spill out. Town awards Alpha House single -user water district By GERI SPEICH ULYSSES—Members of the Ulysses Town Board met on Sepember .16 with an agenda that focused on the needs of town residents for water. Both the request of the Alpha House Foundation and the questions of the Jacksonville residents concerned the need for water supply systems. According to Town -Supervisor Martin Luster, the Alpha House Foundation has sought water, to serve the needs of the 50 to 60 residents of the drug rehabilitation program operated on Route 227, for several years. The town has' agreed to enter into a -con- tractual relationship with the Village of Trumansburg to form a single -user water district and supply water to Alpha House. All costs for installation. and maintenance of the water districts will be paid by Alpha House. Goverh- mentait grants will help defray the financial burden incurred by Alpha House. Luster says the town's resolution is built on an understanding that residents along the line of the water main could hook-up to the system. However, any resident who seeks to tap into the water supply must. first petition both the town and village, boards and then approach- the Alpha House board before being approved for connection to the water line. Luster said he was "rear happy" with the solution. He also said no one spoke against the resolution at the public hearing held on September 15. Terming it "a worthwhile program," Luster pointed to the fact that the district will .serve the needs of some 60 town residents. The update on the Jacksonville water problem was once again abbreviated by a lack of test results and in- formation from state officials in the Department of Environmental Conservation and Department of En- viranmental Health. Neither the hydrogeological study commissioned by DEC from Empira$oils nor results of the last rounds of water testing were made public. However, Luster did quote Tom Suozzo, Regional Oil Spill Engineer for .DEC as saying the -state 'is ap- parently not willing to foot the bill for a water supply system to -tate four homes identified as having been contaminated by gasoline in the past. Once again,'the results of testing proved the levels of contamination have been, fluctuating, with the water at the Hughes' home currently showing contamination_ above state guidelines. On the matter of obtaining test results so the -town can continue to work with the engineering flan it has hired, Luster said, "The public has to realize that this is a contract to which the town is not a party. We are not paying the $30,000 (for the tests) which is one of the strings attached:" -Hs also said, "-Preliminary' in; -dications are that, the contamination may be mare: widespread than initially reported. "However, without further details, he could not comment further. Dennis O'Neil presented and read a letter from the Trumansburg- Lions Club in support of a muticipal water supply system for Jacksonville. The Ietter.affir- med the commitment of the Lions Club to bettering the environment and maintaining- a stance of ad- vacating responsible government. O'Neil said he feels the board is falling short of its own -goals set last spring to have a solution in hand by -late summer. Another Jacksonville resident, William House - worth, ,said he had gas in his water, but had not repor- ted it until this time. He'wants to hook into any water supply system created, particularly since be assumes the water main line will be brought across his property lines. In other business, the board: •tabled discussion on the, subdivision regulations Continued Pn page -24 Tram page 1 1 1 until October; *received a report the speed limit on Pennsylvania Avenue will only be extended to within one-quarter mile of the village limits; and • approved budget hearings for October 2 and November 6 at 7:30 p.m. The budget will be adopted on November 18. The October 2 meeting will be held as a Special Town Board meeting. Trumansburg Free Press September 24, 1986 off rt0 0 M m 00 ao rn m ro More contamination By GERI SPEICH ULYSSES—The long-awaited re- sults of the Jacksonville hydrogeologic study .commissioned by :the New York . State .DIpartment of- Environmental, Conservation (DEC) Oil Spill -Bureau were revealed at a special meeting. The -town hall- was filled with local residentsi county and: state politicians, and experts in related fields as Tom Suozzo, DEC engineer in charge of the clean-up, interpreted - the maps and data presented by -Empire-Thomsen in. their report. The study was based on a. prediction of. groundwater flow and. uncovered- two different plumes, or concentrations, of pollution In the sub- surface. Both. are in the overburden of the soil ' and, in the bedrock under Jacksonville. Stum=bling blocks in the way of providing a.clean water supply for the. homes identified to- have gasoline by- products in their drinking supply in- clude the identification of another area in Jacksonville water of contamination across from the original site of the 1979 spill, at the Jacksonville service station. High con- centrations of hydrocarbons. also were Mound in front of the antique shop on the corner of Route '96 where it inter- sects with Jacksonville Road. Suozzo said the amount of con- tamination and its effect on _ the problem could not be determined, but his main concern was to prdvide drinking water to the four identified homes. He outlined three methods of dealing with the contamination: removal;of the soil; flushing of the soil with a process such as -an -air stripper; and 'bioreclamation. The last method has proven:. =popular lately though results have not been fully tested. The process introduces bacteria that eats the hydrocarbons in the soil and necessitates the addition --of oxygen into the soil to feed the bacteria and hasten the process. Continued on page 24 From ..• . CJ Water The.DEC drilled for water in Jacksonville this sum- mer, in an atte* mpt to locate a source for the water sup- ply. Clean water ivas thought to -have been found behind Roger William's house on Beech. Stover's property and the yield proved satisfactory. However, the wells show levels of contamination from other metals, such as chromium. These labs will be confir- med with results from samples sent -to Friend's Laboratory and the State Department of Health, ac- cording to Environmental Health Director John An- dersson. If the results released by Buck. Laboratory in Cortland are substantiated, Andersson will look for their source. Treatment of the contamination is possible, but not recommended. A pure source is the. best supply, he says.. Other substances with high con- centrations include varium, chlorides, hydrogen sulfide and mercury. High concentrations of hydrocarbons also were Iound in'front of the antique shop on the corner of Route 96 where it intersects with Jacksonville Road. Once again the town board heard the experts testify that a "high degree of contamination still exists. In the spring it could dilute, but it could also spread." The plume lies close enough to other homes for Town Supervisor. Martin- Luster to recommend the -DEC ex- tend the boundary of their proposal to several other homes. This would necessitate the formation of a water district and would . make it subject to state guidelines. DEC would pay costs for construction, but Po%aAv."i-minkgas pipeline leak contained By JOHNNAUKEY said the s=. ,6u#ftg-, soil would be covibed Journal &&ff and. aerated to reEWos V any 94$ residue. PODUNK — Weather permitting, a con= lechard P ' " wrier of- the, property struction crew from the Mobil Corp, will re- through wluclt the lefng pipe section runs, place.a section of pipe this afternoon that was reported tiie leak Q11 'uesday at about 1 trace arapiints of leaking gasoline into'Tafi- haanock•Creek'Wednesday. 10 am. -Si eakdnJ minor," lid4ag Frank Booher; a construction"supervisor said Wednesday `5 :y not trio worried about for Mobil.in Rochester, said the leak was ads- coming from ab damage l�tirling filfe a parently a welding seam on a jai $Asoline appeared collar joining two sections of 64hch pipe as a sheen 011, about 15 feet from the creek. Department of Environmental Conserva- By abotit 11;'30 a.." 'htesiiy; Furling said a represbntatave bfb�I ova at the acene� A tion field agent Peter Taylor, who examined cleaff-up ae': wlffe� �vpxked through the the "pinhole=sized" leak T�iesday night* said night. 40P.Med..ft') . ` - a'fter yard, it was "minor" and had not spilled enough Booher said. a sl 04, d welding job may gasoline•to contaminate the 'soil bl water. have been Ie cau. e • he leak . Booher said the spill'hadbeen contained; by The PiPena, P ti u mar supply line #o gas -absorbing. sponges, while a small. corral, fife north and, a le ns in Mobil's of absorbent pontoons was. aTra#tged fn tie Roro,, r fe erg and'travels as far creek tQ prevent gas from; flowing dpi= '�' s�,. a QbYo lin ;,a north to Bu#ful0 stream. and Syracuse; Once the flow of gasoline, has been cut offWith P4tmmg&�tY of about 42,000 to the pipeR i3o.Qher said a 12 -foot section 9 gad43t¢.:.pQrReety�tfixk., of ptpelite feeds l4 the pipe would be replaced to prevent f irthei- �4PP 5' stat;aps leaks. Jtfle§ DfRoceo, a IU 6btl employee in 1 rnd- Booher said. there is no danger of more gewater, N , said in addition to three leakage from that section: grades of gasoline, tyle�,pielisfe carnes heat - As part of the clean-up operation, Booher ing.oil, kerosene, stili crit fuel. Ithaca Journal Thursday, October 16, 1986 pok -4� -tw Ivi a moves closer to an -outside water hook-up By JOHN O'SHEA ULYSSES --A price tag as much as $774,000 has been placed on the latest water district proposal for the hamlet of Jacksonville. In a preliminary report delivered to the town board last week, Hunt Engineers calculated the cost of bringing potable water to the homes in Jacksonville from the Trumansburg municipal water System. - As proposed, the new district would include the ex- tension of a water main from the, southernmost ter- n7inou5 of the village system along Route 96 to Jacksonville. It would service 20 residences along Route 96 and 5-0 homes within.the hamlet itself. And as present ly"'coricdvedj the cast- .of the in.- stallation-would he borne s'01JyVb those homeowners within the district and not by -other property owners within the town. The cost per user within the water district, under the preliminary Hunt proposal, could run as high as 5700 to S800 per year, but town officials have speculated that state and federal funding amounting to perhaps 5460,000 may be available. If so, the engineers figured, the annual cost per user could drop to less than half of the full -'cost numbers. -Town Supervisor Martin Luster, however, called the numbers submitted with the report "very preliminary," noting that the annual cost to users ^� 4couid increase if the project is financed for a shorter period of time than the proposed 40 years. And he said the town board will also consider including homes on Swamp College Road and Cole Grove Road .which were excluded from the latest Hunt proposal. Comic ued on page 24 Tram page I Xville water The present plan calls for the supply of water only to those Jacksonville residents within 1,000 feet of the in- tersection of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road and living primarily along those roads. In a major step to move quickly on the water district, Luster and other town officials will attempt to meet with the federal Department of Housing and Ur- ban Development (HUD) during early January for a "pre-screening 15rocedtire... to give us -an idea if we have a viable plan," Luster said. The town will seek at least $400,000 from HUD to offset a major portion of the project costs. Other funding sources to be investigated include the State Department of Environmental Conservation which local officials indicate has already offered 560,000 in aid, the Federal Home Administration, Appalachian Regional commission and the Community Development and Small Cities Program. Dennis O'Neil, a frequent spokesman for Jackson- ville homeowners and one whose water has been con- taminated with benzene since 1979, told board mem- bers that a-concensus of hamlet residents seems to in- dicate that most could afford up to an additional 5500 per year. for clean water, but anything beyond that amount ould be unattainable for many. And he said marry Jacksonville residents were con- cerned enough about recent tests of private weIIs in the hamlet to want to attend the next meeting of the Tomp- kins County Health Board "to clarify questions we have ... and to straighten out the confusion over the test results." f And as presently conceived, the cost of the installation would be borne solely by those homeowners within the district and not by other property owners within the town. Tests of a number of.private wells within Jackson- ville released Iast month showed traces of potentially harmful substances such as chromium, barium, mer- cury and nitrates. The next meeting of the County Health Board will be at noon, January 13, in the H Building of the County Office Complex, County Representative James Mason told the board. In addition to hooking up with the Trumansburg municipal.. water system.which "seems to be the most reasonable," Luster said, the town will also continue to explore other possibilities including a recently prof- fered partnership with the Town of Ithaca in a new well located at the Cayuga Lake to service both Jacksonville and the Town of Ithaca's West Hill sec- tion. Town .Board member Thomas Reitz said he had spoken recently with Ithaca Supervisor Noel Desch who broached the partnership as a way to relieve his town from having to pruchase water from the City of Ithaca and to spur additional development on West Hill. Trumansburg Free Press December 17, 1986 - The Board displayed something less than unanimity last week, however, over the appointment of a new Receiver of Taxes following -the sudden resignation of - Paula Mount from that position. Luster said he had received Mount's resignation on the previous Saturday which left • the town "in a bind,.. with no one to do the job or receive the taxes on January. 2." He proposed appointing Anna Sladish, who had previously held the position, as an interim tax receiver until the next general election. But his motion to appoint Sladish was defeated 3 to 2 by ;board members who indicated that the supervisor was being too hasty and that a wider slate of can- didates for the position should be considered before a final selection.is made. The 'town *has advertised for the position and the board will apparently make its decision at a special meeting at 9 a.m., December 20 at the Town Offices. �. In other business, the board unanimously approved an increase in the income load for property tax exemp. tions for elderly homeowners. The exemption of 50 percent of the property taxes is now available to persons 65years old with annual in- comes.up'to $12,025. Previously,* this figure'has been ` $10,500. i This, resolution also raises the eligible income levels of persons above the .minimum. On a. sliding scale f established by the.•town, -elderly persons with incomes above $12,025 but less than -$15,025 can also receive RropercY.4a et�oQ�prangin down, to 20..pe rcept dependmgon income. 00 ON H r+ x w M 0 a as I J-wille water district- might cosi$1 million By FRED YARN Journal Sbff JACKSONVILLE — Hooking onto Tru- mansburg's water system to form.a Jacksonville water district supplying about 70 homes could cost as much as $1 million, officials estimate. Exact figures are not . available, although Ulysses town officials are seeking the answer from the town's engineering firm, Hunt Engi- neers of Painted Post. Hunt already came up with an estimate of $7759000 for a water system using a 44nch main pipe that would hook onto the Trumansburg system. But that estimate puzzled Ulysses town offi- cials, who assumed that Hunt would come up with a proposal that used an 8 -inch main. "For this kind of municipal water system, an 8 -inch main is common, and it's been a prereq- uisite all along that to form a new water district we would have to have an 8 -inch main in Jack= sonville.hooking up with Trumansburg's 8 -inch main system," said Thomas Reitz,. town board member. Reitz and Town of Ulysses Supervisor Martin A. Luster both think the necessary change to an 8 -inch main would cost at least an - additional $225,000. `It's been a prerequiso ite all along that to form a new water district we would have to have an 8 -inch main in Jacksonville hooking up with Trumansburg's 84nch main system..' —Thomas Reitz, Ulysses town .board member Luster and other town officials are hoping for a January meeting with Department of Housing and Urban Development officials in Buffalo to discuss' funding possibilities for a Jacksonville water system. Town officials have said as much as $460,000 in state and federal funds might be available to help build such a system. A municipal -type water system has been des- perately needed in Jacksonville for the past seve- rat years, following the discovery of gasoline el- ements in: five private water wells seven years ago. . One of those elements, benzene, is stili evident in those wells and a couple others. along Jack- sonville Road, near its intersection with Route 96. The contamination into the aquifer was caused by a broken underground gasoline tank coupling. Since then, the Department of Environmental Conservation has been involved in trying to find a solutjon to the problem, along with Ulysses town officials. This fall, it was thought that a solution had been found. A well dug on the* Beach Stover property on the east side of Route 96, not far from the homes with contaminated water, was found to have good flow. But that well had water that contained chro- mium, among some other elements. It Vas ruled out as a potential source by Tompkins County Health Department officials. . County officials are checking the water qual- ity of another well, on the west side of Route 96. The proposed Jacksonville system roughly would include residences within 1,000 feet of the Jacksonville Road -Route 96 intersection. ville residents. support water plan )T7WILLE — About 30 fe. residents faised their ippon of a proposed wa- foi their' hamlet Monday i public hearing at the le Community Church, two people showed their if Wat..show. of support is any in- dicatbriR' a March 26 referendum oil the propgsed water district will pass by' ait:oi+erwhelming margin, Anil :all that's peeled to approve ho'dfst=ivt is a. 51 percent majority �, fnvocr.rto nAatter how:iiaany,.•show �� : iip Rt.`tte ,tolla.. V .A11'. landowners who pay town 'hazes .in. the. proposed- district, - 'acaoYd-0 ',tp Aho latdst•tax rolls, are u' .yote� A ers, inrlhding town resi= dents not residing in the proposed water -district's boundaries, cannot vote. Because the Town of . Ulysses board is seeking a $400,000 federal Department of Housing and. Urban Development Small Cities grant to help fund the district, a public hearing was -required Monday night. 'Following the hearing, the town board unanimously authorized the March 26 referendum, and rep- resentatives from the town's engi- neer, Hunt Engineering of Painted Post, urged residents to complete an income survey that is being cir- culated among residents in the pro- posed district. They also urged resi- dents to write to the.town board in support of the- district.. • ,The proposed district includes an area about x,000 feet in diameter, centered. at the Jacksonville Road - Route 96 intersection. The pro- posed district also would serve homes along the west side -of Route 96 to the north of the .hamlet, for an additional. 1,000 feet. The district would serve about 70 homes and a few small businesses. Jacksonville has been plagued .for many ,years with water pollut- ion and a lack of water pressure. In 1979, an underground gaso- line tank coupling broke at a serv- ice station. affiliated with Mobil at the Jacksonville 'Road -Route 96 in- tersection. le"g-gasoline into an aquifer. There bane` ' beea no further leaks, but benzene and other rem- dants of the gasoline remain in the aquifer M.�oy,b�,il, is.' no longer affil- ffF� latep stabott: �;$��f watac sgiyrs� alb Jacksonville Road remain polluted by gasoline and the Department of EnvirobMeutal Conservation. is continuing As. efforts to Come up with a small water system for those residents to be.bufl4y:,stat ;fpm the oil still fuis. w< Nfa14Y R, 5A Costs for homeowners outlined Explaining what it will cost the homeowner in the proposed water district for Jacksonville, .Ulysses town - board member Thomas Reitz outlined different expenses to -residents there: For a house assessed of $30,000 where two people use a total of 100 gallons of water per day, or 36,500 gallons per year, costs would be: $713 for first year of debt. service. The amount charged for debi service would go down slight- Ithaca Journal March 3, 1987 ly each year over the term -of the bond. * $142 for one ysar's. user fee. • about $500 to cover the hoW up cost, bringing .a line from the resident's property linelto *e *4- ter pump or storage tank. The bg- ureis based..nn $15 per. foot, f6r an incoming line. $123 for maintenance per household,.. across the new .wafer district. The costs would amount io41,-.. 480 for a homeowner in the ficst- year of the district's formation:. Wat (Confirmed from Page 3A) to the district; other than it was a but Luster em But, in a l I essin8 the ov P ,that 1.non-bin needs of the haml the. To _ _ Tins non-bindingrequest of the village. town must obtain a iii ID" Board members said they would or it can't proceed with theme County Health department has' continue to work. with the village to $ven if aandovYpi long been an advocate foga muiyd- possibly negotiate that figure. provethe fro eet IJtarclr pal�'Water cyst ^ vdwthe $159,000 sufn plus the state and the''tgwn board 'f' ettiag tfie GbntinRemsi. projected cost 4f creating tiiF JajCl r ew.pQwere Aad ogd., vel' nesi! tLsciaiisries 1ni�,�rirp�?. M,:s,,,,- ---- •+...= - ,., $��_ 4n _tfiF ,;11t # y -kin-i�'trt" uvwu Vie: wes�'��¢C oI KOu_. tP�' - -e the town receives a $400,000 IiUD vvartd .iack3;Qnvi�le;, - • • get. Town board mennhers Just %iutd Luster said that would mean a out that the Trumansv 4ge bW house assessed at $30,000 would be. board i`k'4V) u�gfior a $1S9,0 at taxed an additional $713. for debt fee .Q Book onto the village water• service over regular town taxes in .system ' f the first year -of the district, if a 25- Town of Ulysses Supervisor 'year, 8 -percent bond were issued. Martin. A. Luster said he was given Several other financing scenarios no reason for the $159,000 expense were explained to the gathering, -aid from tate state Lsluir as either the I angers tratio .. or the to Imp�o etl llousi Ageacyi. Luster and i6wa attorney. B1ir L 'beth Bixler said district Lando '„',e= w4. , ... Probably would have to hook o the municipal system within a ified period. ,Jacksonville Dilemma Hamlet Prepares to vote on Water It Needs But May'Nov.-W, Able to Afford f t+ve don't get the water, Jaeksorsrvill: W1# d1e as far as An concerned." — f*n0 01AW. By lt. SCOT -T RAPP JAC"ONVMLE — It was -eight years Mori.tY to APA m*Cipal water from the ago ibis, month that a Route 96 service station's gasoline tank, line ruptured be. village Of Urg to a nawly creat= o about 7$ residents xn posed distriet eau.,vote•March 2$, podgy neath the ground, spewing thousands of . fuel the affected aY The- cost is $033,QpQ, an it wool 4 add estimated g p.m. in the Jaeksonvillu. CQm'* Methodist Church. gaUona- of into the aquifer that re- plloWsnes this Tompkins County hamlet's $600 to $1,b00'in user.,, aint6fth0p rites -'to The proposed district woul d fi; pry-atedrinkii �vglls; residenls'd u�,th water district. publicwater: to praperf es soitjt b y It is an anamv. ersary that people would kA*er 10.tget :hut can't beca ' e the coma- The town ries, which encom� passes Jaciaonvili iiia " " t 4, y also have to pay g fairgtaoun%to$ p01 feet south of the tptgr$eGttdu Route nAteti grbund water threatens to. make Ws commuter waystation 4,800 95�anaa4sbd`a on time feg for tli$ hook- up4 Thevill$ s g is' ;001• and Jacksonville Road A11 pt+hPentj within a 1,000 -foot radius of them ! of rest- dents a ghost town. Y= pd" 5150 `M3' COb s$dd Luoe;' U that the tion wopld also he nzclu`ed in the distrix "It The �asol . e liiF s contaminated at least reartlentaal wells neartile' intersec- town will beo g this in at the expense the -costo dieirict ( tie $ 04 , $1,000, I know it wonyt o Id6h0 thi g ,....,anyone U'bf Route 98 AN Jacksobville Road, the main crossroads: Ia their search fora of the taxpayers when it's a Mobil Oil in the.world wantstp ay. $ for water,".said O'Neil, wbp runs.2 opo clean water enures, offficials ha�►e also di,scoveSced a nu�ber of potentially dan- problem." Mobit`Oil Corgi, provided gasoline to t1re' 14i goods, sore Tro y "lionse. gerona lea metals in the and water. }'Y ground Armors tan ranipa{it in a town with' Jacksonville Serviee Station when the leak was discovered.. Luce and a number es Town $upe Vn said he is also worrier ah4uth prdi e3cns. It is no dif Brent bore. Some of Jacksonville regidents have started imipact of file r' osed iia e Iegal action against the oil conglomerate; the 'We're doing. ev * residents say the pollution is spreadiugg, but cases baveyet to,be heard. "My only hope is, to et the water and g the figure," Luster sari.: " f (Continned h P$gg F and they fear- the contaminated *Atex sell the place,"'said Luce, who has resid- will cut short their lives or the lives sof ed here the past 18 yeam their children and grandchildren. Hopes Creation of the water district. would do not sell easily, if at all, while property benefit Dennis O'Neil of Jacksonville values continue to slide. ' RoAdj who said getting purewater is:.arit- '.' "You- couldn't sell one of these houses if ical to ., Jacksoovllle';�' survival. -"If we* yoti Wanted; to. Their values are comple, don't get` the water, JacicsoAvilla will,die tele Qvoxwegs right now," said Clayip as' far as I'm coneerbdd," said QW611, Luce, whose well on Jacksonville Road . whose well is•also contaminated. has been contsminated-since 1979: O'Neil said he .is. oppeerned that tthe Thp. future of this hamlet'may rest with cost of th proposed water district is too a Math 28. referendum that seeks au- expensive and "will spell defeat for the referendum. Only taxpayers in the, pco- Post Standard Thursday, March 5, 1987 Jack,Jn- V*7i]le FinureMdes On.March-26 ��. e�rendu �. ifrom•Page'B-1,) Tru hansburg Village Clerk Syl C!eO#ion`of the' district hinges . 'Via Potter said the village has not on .this tiinvn receiving a $400,000 committed itself to pumping fed W Hoping and �Utban Devil- water -to Jacksonville, which is opmeritt gram Withofft 'the grant, about five miles away to the south; the pp -NO _ i de' . L7 tic.; said. • j or set a firm price. She will the The yd cV* #nanoial burden is village has had a'longstanding pol- CPU tin ant yon how many outside itq of charging one and a Half grams t�h , dwA pawobtain and• times the rate fee'to users'oatside wheEth+sr iiia fawn daoldes. to bond the village. Or. bcM.-W., the o'uts#siid . g. balaaM Alpha' House;. a .drag cehabilita- The On is hoping to r�eive arp otli�r tiilodo in. state. grant ., tion, center on. Route 227, U the only outside water. consumer anis money-, wi h would •leave a . it pays for the maintenance of its $2p%QJ0Q deficit to•*ance,-I<nster system, she said. The center was said, ; `, • . Ii aha town• ,i�nrrowed the not-required to pair' an upfront ,tiser'fee-. which is set-at $2,250 per $$8g,0Ap a move the town prob- nousehold, Potter said. ANY—me{ Lµster said — the "I think the village• is sympa- oa►neri of a p Q Oft assessed at �gvaul '$665 a.y►ear for' thetic to their,-but, problems,• but,the ' village also has an. obligation to consumpqi , and. mainW protect the people Who have ail in- riaacef ihe:systean.. Resideafis in vestment in the systeia and have ,ho di$trict wbiild -a'iso have to pay been paying intact for a number. A .0 9:4, hpioiti #ee, which of years," Potter said.!" The people ranges befweea $7 and 15 a toot in Jacksonville are goiiig'to find between the,.;-; e$itieiice an$ street, ' out that water is not a money- oneysal. s4 Iiastet' ' maker.,' said he tllinks Truman$- • Jodele Marshall has. been ap- bui+g:, 46olens -Aee Sitting short'-pointed to a special citizens advi- sglttedly lad looking to makes .sort' board_ to help bring: about a money from creation, of the dig- resolution of Jack§onMe's.water trict...If Jacksonville ooesa't get . problem. Marshall, whose well has pare orate;►; Linter said property tested. for unsafe. levels of.cbromi- assessmen'ts will drop sharply, um, critiblzed Trumifisburg offi- protiOly resulting hi a tag rate in- cials for not cooperating more crease for TrunzaTi§burg residents. with residents in.this hamlet. "To me, it's a sad commentary on. the- way life is now," she said: Marshall. sald her family* has ' bt6 i..dtfbkitig: bottled water for the past severaly .ears,. prompting l ei to say, "•it sure would-bid a ►ile .and 1..re$li a •pri,#Q4 ....'16--be able•to go t9 my step fauieYsn the Toddle of the, night and. draw a glass of, cleg �1 J -vine r odents set- deadline `� for cleanwater fou W Staff Jacksonville residents whose water sm .Ply has-been contaminated andy#nd d useless bY-a .1,979 gasoline spilt, 00 Tuesday that - goyetmen . offidiii W. agencies find thim a dean WAW. ourc6-,*,, -Jan. 2, dr they. will seek.a bpy-opt of homes by the polluter — Mobil Oil Co --or by New York state.. ge.44,o g They are also as the ' king e sf eiral's office to take immediate steps; t Odin -.up theirwater.. on ... ibo�,t nine 'esident;t ijcl,;d1rtg s -1g. -"dren, wore sxgns and picketed the n.690 meeting of thc- Tompkins, C.Gunty Rgmth Department's board in a cold, 4flul front of the Bign1luildin _ 9 The residents recently fdrnie_d. th,e, ,1,1A_A P sonville Clean Safe-Viner, Asso 4 to 4* group they hope will bring themi i 9,, s2ffllon tb.qy -s4y is a 15 -year-old problem. 4 affected residents have also tried to :ger some added clout bjoining with fth P,10 York P6b]ic- *Interest Research sbti d the Central- New York Toxic bA two environmentalist advocacy ey cite three -ggsdline leaks which have, attc ..Mtq th qX- drihking water -from the 0.4 service . station at the center of gjtj�e on Route 96 y also say that not just their seven bmA,a� but a. tdtal6f'22 ho, mes have--beeh .1. .." oO, b$ the ga0djUn0eaks., .Our homes aid' considered worthless. Abjj4 0#1t: 'sell your h6me'in'Jacksonville," 4 4 nn . #.- can't: * v oo.of the gro4O's O'Neil and PWder'az'zo said Am 'rt0alrOes. had not ' to solve iild Okoblem. N Poth Ulysses town supervisor, Mattm Luger .and Assemblyman Hugh Sl.'i acs Neil (R -125th Dist.). denied thil chaYge. ,"The implication- that loca1% 6fficials.' have been doing nothing is incorrect," Luster said.' "Irl . 1f4t, the Department 4-1Eft4irdfiVf men Conseivation (DEC) has, s*p0'; more thhn. $400,000 in its seeth &f,dead, wafer•. fii Jack' 4vill6j"- Luster. W;., add' I so, "Soil has been removed, tests' have *beend"' taken• at various wells, and .wells are checked. at regular intervals : ?,% ­­­ ­—, MacNeil said it would be desirable to first construct the water system for the sey- en homes, and then sue 'Mbil "Ji- woul . !k ;�,, 4� . WIt be good to sue'them said. . Luster said the DEC has identl6d.a pfi- va.te' well that. might be a go6d water sdiircei f6f the'se.ven most seriously affectedhomds' in Jacksonville.. 'O'Neil said *the, Tompkins County He'ailth'bepartment, has -reservations about tisini'lliii well a's.a municipal source as ifs 1;500 feet frdzh d-closed1dwh dump and .'so feet li6m­` a private septic system. -BA,* 14ntgr. said..,well wpuld provide ..,enough -water for seven homes, and con- cerns of the health department could -be oyorcome. In addition to the Jan. 2 deadline the rig- idenis' group set for finding clean water, it wants, 4igging.,for­a.-new -water system to start by April 1, 1988. ...Addjtionajly,, e gr9op demanded con- drivio'tA testing, Aome's' that have detects- ble levels'of 6sdlih ".4' ' 'en- '4' in their war e em ter, :more ac�fdp by'dected. pfficiah, bl d tats: "'Tbr resid�hts]R­ affected houtos, chei4f& gO'f­mes, no.:maintenance fees for affected bohiet'sho!lld a water sysfti. be installed, and continge cy. plans shOuld Ithaca Journal Wednesday, October 21, 1987 a clean water source not be found by. The DEC, through the "oil spill cldmia fund could. implement N th ' cleanup UP ,build a''new water system for the..t&,k homes, then charge the cost back td -14 DEC officials have said fhis is. h6w,the will proceeds if they rind a clean. twfi Source. Town of Ulysses offiaids have triW t have water brought to. the 1 'fiafNet . ftbl� iii trumansburg Sys;gm. but. -0ro 1. .. .094*4 has died twice. Firiii rijidiots idift-i thumbs do*ii on ivo , roposi4 wAit djijr-lk and it died at -the rei&&Ion phase ifojn of the town board. The town also f4ed. to get a :�4Wjl&� federal Department 60tbi.iimg Development grant to pay down watek-system. The DEC And town now ale seeks *.: source close -to the aff&ted,hbmeg. ,fae�iso�wille asks, Are the. - ans wers? ­-Af ijd W coming involved in. the us aClonAuid biiieaucfacy of a e A—& ea, same questions v.ft—" c-on—'Tdiffing bi * -:the 1pak'must be the ones to ini- 1 any ic ert: are our local,,county and d state ijdi when they fare .7' edict' 51 Wh-0_1 ad'06 turn to when there is so - ­ m Oh o4hy, by public officials ull . 4-11. :-riot directly affected? `Vlib g--4people realize that -this Ig? om thing"that is becoming mere more 6 "Thnion, and they could *hltkAlbecomef o the ad ,nomqs setting empry in its cefl& We sincerely hope that the an- swers; to tl*se: questiont -don't conte p0,0jwW f9r . us or for others, that _ _ may fbIlow. - William, Nancy and Rebecca Ho'usworth Jacksonvii1e, Same me on public officialsfor finding no s*olution ThO contamination minat*on o f the ground water inJack�onville . is not an epic tragedy. Perhaps this is one. of the mbb* reasons. it remains unresolved year after year. Although the situation has many features for a good story — a cor- porate ATit refusing to take re - bureaucrats passing thf"11*4 boa and forth, local poli 04 Om'g fingers, and unkept 00N*�i!4- it seems it will never -be a siter T-bdie hits been no groundswell of .public sup pon, no. coming to- ggOid of a community to solve an 9b*4o.*uk problem, and still no wide- soro'iid belief that the families with coi , t_10minated *Agr are victims of a a nQi-boiyou would expect that youcould somehow quickly rectify the skuatcn. The people .affected in Jatksbhville were fro differ4pt. But after many yeaYi* of seeking a solution to a situation that they did not d4sdi frutttatibil'11 . is iord prww- Went tfian' hotie. S 6' KAdqit Ain �$OWtfd 0) dtb.0.TW .4 . &m6 Ag i APA -1 0 410., W Am tnd They. bd-adhainod that this butr.42 . es situation continues. The ozsiy way,to redeem. the elves is to i0t.. water -to; the, victims of the t6kic spill M� Jacksonville Bruce, Fearon Jacki6nville' Dangerous chemicals blood6treaIM ft_0d on information ieceiVed from a similar gasoline spill in North Babylon, n, L.I.: In com . pari - son, I feel I have been served poor- ly by the Tompkins County Health Department,. ocal, 'and state rep- resentatives and agencies., MY family complained many time's to local, county and state rep- resentatives Ab out * strong gasoline fumes in my home. Nothing was done*about thise fumes for over a Year. Becaitse nothing. was done, recent blood tests show the same cancer-causing chemicals in my blood that are in my watersupply. Patrice M. O'Neil Jacksonville Ithaca Journal Wednesday, October 21, 1987 Why are Other spills 'handled M,,Qre quickly.? Our. -US-,b.66, hom.9 -became worthless n'eiwl •Y Uibq years asq.. Why, you may ask? Did it burn in, the 'ground, Of did k become. haunted? : N � * *. , became .. 0, It SJMP1Y ecame contami- nated by gasoline in our well water. Would you like to. live for nine. Years With gasoline contamination' not..on)y in drinking water but in the gtouild and air as well? But. really the state DEC and town officials, not to mention the Tompkins County Health Depart- ment, have worked hard to find a solution 'to; our problem here .in Jacksonville. However, other spill sites seem to be handled in record iime'cbmpaied to the Jacksonville spill - Maybe because this spill is bigger than theirs? We here in this household are hoping for a solution this year. Are we,setting our -sights too high? Are we asking too much? Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Luce' Jacksonville A -chance to resolve two problems at once Ten months ago .1 wrote a letter to the editor regarding the gasoline cOn ajnijjtjoj regarding me Q. sd;vetal priVA" wells. in Jacksonville. Since that time two more faMfliq fiave been = iacf.0d by carcip'ogens i m their at;* -W er— , . The New York State Department of Briv"onrfidntal Conservation i' ,U - s 4Qj.#.4nisihj'Asolution before the 0_0*1 ZT, to and �h ft own board e resideptt of JacksorWille and_use the'l _ d"for' the county aum'fi-, - A nine-year ordeal We 1hre iti JacksoftviU4 . have h been dealing with gasolifij in our drinking water for nine" jiears. Helpl Bill and Esther Hog - es Jacksonville Poisoned Waters, Jacksonville Residents Press Oji. Company By FRANCES DINKELSPrEL ITH ACA — The sign 5 -year oidCorey O'Neil wore to the protest said it al "I've lived my whole life with poisoned crater, thanks to Mobil." The slogan, while short and slick, summed up the sense of frustration some Jacksonville residents feel about their water situation. Eight years ago, gasoline from a service station leaked into the water supply of seven Jacksonville fami- lies; today they still drink from bottled water supplies. Mobil Oil Corp, was believed to be the supplier for the gas station. The residents, who organized them- selves into the Jacksonville Clean Safe Water Association, held a press confer- ence and protest Tuesday outside the Tompkins County Health Department. The residents, bolstered by the support of New York Public Interest Research Group and the Central New York Toxics Coalition, used the opportunity to harshly criticize the way local politicians and (ocal health department officials have ,esponded to the crisis. The residents urged for faster action. "We've never before demanded the officials do anything," said Penny Cal- derazzo, a member of JCSWA. But, she said, "the problem isn't of our making, We will no longer allow the system to make us pay for someone else's prob- lem." The group set a Jan. 2, 1988 deadline for the Health Department and state Department of Environmental Conserva- tion to identify a crater source. Digging for the new water source must commence by April, or the residents will ask that Mobil Oil buy out their homes, said Cal- derazzo. The group's efforts have prompted one elected official to offer stronger support to the cause, said Dennis O'Neil, a Jack- sonville resident. State Sen. James Seward recently wrote a letter to the State Attorney General's Office, the state Department of Health,.the DEC and the chairman of the senate Health and Environment Committee, asking them to look into this matter, according to Jean Proto, Tompkins County liaison tc Seward. "Nobody's said anything like that before," said O'Neil. Martin Luster, supervisor for the town Of Ulysses, denied the implication that nothing has been done by public officials to resolve the problem; he said. He and Assemblyman Sam MacNeil met with DEC officials on Monday to work toward a solution, said Luster. "Our efforts are ongoing and are dili- gently going on," said Luster. The contamination problem that begain in 1979 has not been cleaned up. The resi- dents are provided with bottled drinking water and carbon filter systems from Mobil Oil. Post Standard Wednesday, October 21, 1987 The DEC has also examined severi potential wells, but none have produce enough water or met health require tnents, said Luster. However, is one wel at initially was rejected by the Healt Department, because it was too near a, +bid municipal dump, now looks promis lily, said Luster. But Luster's approach, as well as the hpproaches taken by MacNeil, the DEC (and the Health Department, move toe slowly, the residents charged at the press ponference. That approach is to first fine �pew well, tabulate the cost of the disco. C+ery, and then go to Mobil Oil Corp, and k it to pay up. Seven years later, that attitude has gotten the residents nowhere, 4a:id O'Neil. J -ville Residents Ask State to Sue Mobil By 5TEYEPROCTOR TRUMANSBURG—Members of the Jacksonville Clean and Safe Water Association convened a press conference last Wednesday at the Ulysses Town Hall to discuss their recent meeting in Albany with. high- level NYS officials. The group of four had travelled to Albany on December 18 to seek legal action by the Attorney General against the Mobil Oil Corporation. Frustrated by years of searching for a clean water source for their homes, the four Are seeking a buyout of the houses and property by Mobil. "I want enough money to relocate and buy another house," said JCSWA member Clayton Luce at the Wednesday press conference, suggesting that 5150,000 was about the sum of money he had in mind. "I would be happy with enough money to move away from my home forever," said Dennis O'Neil, another JCSWA activist. - The four stated they were doubtful that clean water would be available to their homes within the foreseeable future and that a buyout was their only remaining option. They believe that the two wells now being considered as a possible water source for the affected area will never solve the problem and that a hookup with an existing municipal water system is also not likely. "Our faith in local officials and the local health department has brought us only years of grief and bottled water," said Penny Calderazzl speaking for the JCSWA; Currently eight homes and two businesses near the intersection of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road have wells which are contaminated by gasoline. The homes are supplied with elaborate filtration systems and bottled drinking water by Mobil which owned the Jacksonville service station where in the 1970s a leak in the underground storage tanks allegedly emptied Iarge amounts of gasoline into the earth. The plume of this underground contamination has been passing downhill from the spill ever since, reaching the eighth home only within the last year. The NYS DEC is now looking at two wells as possible water sources for the affected homes; one is located on the Whitaker property near the center of Trumansburg Free Press January 20, 1988 the hamlet and the other is in Jacksonville Community Park, just west of Route 95 off Swamp College Road. While the DEC and some local officials have been very positive concerning these two locations the JCSWA believes they are both unusable. Arr'attempt a few years ago to'connect the hamlet to the Trumansburg water system became too expensive for the local tax base and a subsequent application for a HUD grant to underwrite the project did not win approval. The JCSWA had stated in a press conference held a few months ago on the steps of the county health department that unless a solution to their problem was unveiled by the end of the year they were going to consider alternative solutions, primarily a buyout by Mobil. Precedents do exist for this demand — large corporations have purchased certain properties and houses after actions by the corporation had environmentally damaged the sites. The .December 18 meeting in Albany, arranged by NYS Senator James Seward, was between the four JCSWA members and Dean Sommer, Assistant NYS Attorney General, plus representatives from the NYS Department of Health,, Department of Transportation and the DEC. "Our purpose was to ask for their aid," said Cal- derarzl at the Wednesday press. conference, adding that after years of dealing with local officials and agencies`;hey had finally decided to take their case to higher levels of government. Cnlderazz] stated that for over ten years they had attempted to find a solution to their problem by As the sign on the front fawn of a Jacksonville home declares — Don't Drink the Water. photo kv Skin Thorne OD OF _0 P� e, hi) obil t! M� -b-L Aces S_ .. .. .. . .. Haiffl t=� OR . - - : W'.6 B -FRS D YAH' Jacksonville; a'distance of about eighi nisle's. �• ,vnul l expect,tli�t'i a 'wouid.acCe t•titeir Y • iJa:u.7r.�1 Staff Rdwtiid ;-said ll€e .hatiics.:iliat.;are:;Uaugl3t tiy. r resEioiisik�ility;,fo[ nof_ ba y :reitiiliursittt ,us :for Fh• our lip:nes but also far the tamilies' rt€n and �„dy1CI�SD�1V1)i�I�i-- "Cite Mobil t3i1' Corp. Mobil rna.,3 crazed. -'� � , P _ ,,. t offered to buy'otit eight.lacksor3vi3ie 1)nrnes i}ic.141 spilica€nc 1•roli� a,1 sQnville sere sut'fer�ttb, a Neik satd 0'%�a a had:poll&&l water since 197 as part ice statux located at t13c info rseCtiti r] .kLoute 9G. I xvo otlmr pohits:of tl3e settlement �vcrc; `bfa settlement with state'.S.17ep.iriment of. l_nvi- a 3itl;..Jackstinville. Road. Tile .sta[ic�rt;..«as: aper. Mobil. will, reini.burs.e.. the slatc..'s,..oil.,.spill' .:.` rpitrrteti'tal Co3iservatinti.:atxi alt€trney ge»c'rai: atcd al the ti€ite t]y rite late kLvgcr fl', W, luno ftittci:far $lk3Q,ilt]O;.tltt:s'tini the IAC has spent 1: obil._s• okeswornan. C_ arolc Edward said an vascasing the ip. pti .��i�id .storage tanks. froth ail the Clealitl�; d-�lioliii. w lI.:tis< allUwed :la p t3. �iidep€ 3i;xi�Eair ittai ket t° 31ue appraisal: idill.k)e Molil, audit theiiiis` or "taf expense "Che lilt soil€ mr,de for tlie:e�gl3t: }ic�siie;, IUc;iled along Jack- OV an undetornr33�C[i period of tine, gas - fttud;;:ulticli was creatett.tb .pay.;for. site I eme3• sariville Ituati ileal. lt[3rtfc r3C�..:: leaked from a t�rolccii: wuieit+i`ciuii.d coupling bca geiiCics;'is adinii5istercd tliidUgh the slatC cl�il�p "It's: also possible that two other homes will t�vicert an above-grd izticl .pu3tily. T2� ast. utt[lei- troller;.." 'kie ii)cluilctl ciith tliZ eight, hut. �4i'ic itat':silie al bi€)uiid.stv.iage tasik::'= "IVlsibil «i11.:1indcrtalic. airy' ieasil)le..ierriedi tl.. :.[his titrte," Fd%3ards said this itiortiIng .,"%Ve feel The station ,v :then close&&" "at:,.I n()LV act€vides necessaiy .to .keep tile. u€ derl;round... €r[iii3 )t:aitcl-coi)i'}ete;saiti= ":; Uce3t ii[3:c3icil't€ltd'' ilt�v::ws.toi= -' i ie-ti.F [gasoline) CoiilaIhiiiiints' froi'it 4iiicad=.' tltat..tliisiis rite ntUst.l 1 ... n .:... f�.. tion '1118 utast cast effudirc for•lviotiil'.:li .ti null :. 'age taitks'and ::e[irii�i'ei.it .aI- i •unci; tile ' iiig'further', Have taken. several.ni[)nt.ltr tq..i {)slsl:r3ls l-a.Wzitc:r 171 C. lrts.afl)t`oved;'t�eh, _ - ".:T]f C''slia.kesniaii it.W.Grcit ��1'kids tile: system andis «ork ❑til [hc. iielails r f a wate'l' ''iL'c'ri plcase[i 'Atli the i)iiydutkat'1'er from. iiboveiioi€ifs were tvor.]ccd out =lis cbfiference. district." i�tpUil,,3€€td l can speAk fur all a til htsn�cayvners telelili� AO,!'..call Wednesday,..i€lvoli,ing :the DEC,. Lk' rEries[a4 .t[i=fps. utii] iii rile i Heli .1 sa that' Iliev. waist the lii;�ai3t " said Aiifc deparitliwi3t; h'toii1, 2 i cJF'SiAl fund ]1101111 had :itiitsl c v t - .. Y, statetopvscd .^"' fer 'Bile be .. Dl orals O'Neill a sl)[3kcsrilan,.for ti C. ir' cctcd adilii -and static, ad or isey'ge3tcri#I.'.s-t5t�cc. is t t S - �' .. ... _ .t. ........ CC br6ilglitfrom:i}iE, 4 fi i I��.`,:.g ]s esti. a ls[3rit�ow€>ers.::.: .- . (Continued from Page 1A) i'epreserltatives. 'Further details of the agreement are expected to be made final today, when the appropriate parties meet in Albany," Grone= man said. Mbbil's Edwards said she expects the settlement to include a resolu- tion of the pending lawsuits against Moth] that homeowners have l roujh •since the 1979 leak-. Town of Ulysses Supervisor Mai=tila, A.,Luster said he was disap- pointed ,that the settlement didn't include .a water system for Jackson- ville, paid .,for. by Mobil. When •the state gave Mobil an ul- titriattim two• 'weeks ago, to come up with a settlement, the state gave Mobil two alternatives: build a new water system or buy the douses. "I am not very happy with the prospect of eight. to 14 abandoned m hoes in Jacksonville. A buyout does not solve the problem and cre- ates the prospect of a long-range negative economic effect," Luster said. "The Ulysses town board had backed a buyout as a last resort only. In my oliinion, .all other pp- tioni; have not .been ruled out. In fact, if you add the $480,1144 that Mobil will reimburse the state, plus the cost of the homes, that amount would- fund a water district, he said: "I want to empliasiae that if the homeowners agree to this proposal, it is, as I understand it, in set- tlement of private lawsuits and the town has no control over that deci- sion. Anything less than muhicipal water -in Jacksonville is only the Iusibn of a solution." Edwards said that Mobil has ac cepted responsibility for the 1979 leak. "However, our investig4tions have confirmed -that• Mobil is not the only source of contaminaflon iit the Jacksonville area. We hope this is taken into -account yvhen we' dis- cuss reimbursdmerit of the'expenses for the cleanup that has taken place," Edwards said. Mobil Agrees to Buy 8 Homes (w\ Affected -by Gasoline Leak. W & SCOTT RAPP JACKSONVILLE ;.—the early 1970s, Dennis O'Neil hoped to live and work in this rural hamlet for many more years. Npw, nine years after gasoline` coota- mitnated his private well, he *looks foRward to selling his house to the cor- paration that spoiled his dream and drinking water. `Tm a little scared, but I've got to get my, family out of this mess," said O'Neil. "All we want is a just and fair settle= W.Neil is one of at least eight horneowners whose wells were polluted in 1979, whey} underground gasoline tanks owned by Mobil OR Corp. at a service sla4ion •ruptured and leaked untold mounts of gas intothe, ground water. Until this week; Mobil had yet. to ack-wiedge legal responsibility for the leave: That position changed Thursday when the company and the state Depatrt- nt of Environmental. Conservation dis- (ed Mobil would offer to buy the eight iwuses at fair market value, reimburse the state for its share of cleanup costs related to the leak and continue efforts to stop the underground -plume of gasoline froxr spreading. . "It's a very frustrating situation there," Carole Edwards, a spokeswoman for Mobil. "We wanted to resolve the situa- tion as fairly, as completely and as quickly as we could." In' addition, the proposed settlement calls for the homeowners to -drop or not initiate any Iitigation against Mobil, Edwards said from the company's Fair- fax; Va., office. The eight households have been battling Mobil, and pressing local and state politi- cians and health officials, since 1979 to ,alleviate the problem and get a new clean water source. Iu- the interim, property values have 'Plunged- health fears have escalated and .ill feelings have developed between some._ residents who can drink their, water. and;.those wtio can't. The town of Uiyssess got.to pipe pub- lic water from gl•rumiaiisburg, but resl- dents here iejec. the pfoposal because they said. it Was ton 00stly:. Since last summer, the DEC>�Sbeen drilling test wells in search of a iA6i ; water source, but has yet to find one. The buyout. proposal worries Town Supervispr Martin duster, who said he opposes itteesuse seiveral properties wall be siri Aped from the ,tai rolls, and the town will- beileft with eight vacant and unlivable homes and, the water problem intact.. "Any, thing less. than a new municipal water system ,is only the illusion of a solution-- The effect ,(of the buyout) on the town will be long-lasting and it - doesn't solve our problem," Luster said. Edwards said Mobil would probably raze the houses it buys.. DEC spokesman R. W. Groneman said from AliAOY that there's the possibility that M044 will have to buy out two more houses{hhoids whose wells might have been contaminated in the 197,9 leak. DEC and Mobil Officials have yet to agree on - whether those homes wells were polluted by the Mobil tanks, Groneman said. The DEC official said the state has spent $480;000 from the oil spill fund to clean up the leak, and he noted officials bave yet to prorate Mobil's share of that cost. Groneman said the state expects Mobil to offer the residents fair market value for their homes as if their wells were not polluted. He said the offers will be based on real estate appraisals, and added that Post Standard Friday, March 25, 1988 the homeowners have the option of selft or rejecting the price. One of homeowners, Bruce Fearon o Jacksonville -Road, said he and his wife Penny, had yet to evaluate .the proposa by Thursday afternoon. The Fearow, moved to their home three years ago, an( Bruce Fear` -on said the couple did nd acquire their house with the intent to sel it three yearsaater. O'Neil, who until November ran ; spgrting goods business from the front o his itonme, said his main concern is getting a fair price .from Mobil. Since his wel: became contaminated, O'Neil has wagei a one-linan campaign at times to gei relief, and he vowed to keep fighting:' ii Mobil offers too little money. "Just as long as they make it fair and Ji to -us. Otherwise, we got to keef fighting and we'll see them .in court-" O'Neil said. EDITONK i y NOq-Wck -iii.Jak-ksofi* Tfie gasoline, leak that tainted wells in Jacksonville has meant nine: �eags: of hardship and frustration for the affected households,. With the recent' pressure frofh state officials, a new water system finally appeared to, be on tfie .way. . Instead the parties to the dispute came up with a startling alternative: Mobil Oil offered'to buy out the eight homeowners, And the. Downers and state officials are cordial to the plan. The houses:ui the heart of Jacksonville would likely be razed.. lalo}�v, tto one can blame the oWners for wanting t o end ail agoriiirlg orAeal all recoup then losses. But it's riot clear that Mobil will offer satisfactory prices for their property.. And it was , aggravating -to hear a Mobil, official callthe settlement "the most ; prompt acid complete -solution" and the "most costReffectjve for Mobil," whose station's leaky tank, caused the.cinginal,pro>ajem ? 3=r This quick. fix is no real fix for Jacksonville. i would leave a '} loud. over the hamlet, w4ere other owneirAave found it hafCW 1rT no'i :impossible to sell their property'. -The underground gasoh'i'4:; might yet wander to othet wells, and a number of wells there +V Oready are subject.to bacteria, sulfgp - �Vhier ps eii<i �f; Jacksonville badly needs a reliabi water suppIyh ,,z o1;ElCely�: sped-f`coto-Tr--timansburg. The Town of Ulysses has shown the ' ill to help organize a district and has done moth-of. the irel-rhairp engineering work. But the buyout settlement, roving- an immediate health hazard, could end all hope of 4etting the. outside funding that's essential. to the project. Th.e buyout would indeed be an. easy way out. But the most fPOP..effe five" use of Mobil's money and; state funds as well *gold be a out them toward a new Jacksonville water system. 'VitliOut i the future of this pretty'little hamlet is in doubt. }. Ithaca Journal Saturday, March 26, 1988 N W Meet . the New Nei ghbors And now all thoughts on Jacksonville are concentrated on the bu .y,04t proposal. Mobil has finally spoken and her words were not kind ' . ' - . , offering to Purchase * outright the eight homes poisoned• by the 19.70. gasoline spill. The water district blupprints are now as useless as Pertain Jacksonville, kitchen faucets. lvl6le caned 116d the buyout a "cost -effective" solution* and 9490snoo th-iot e alternative, ' tivi�, o ' ption, a water district, Might hAVe. taken piont6s t, . a o plan and implement. Th' ey wanted a prompt 4000villd has been inhabited for generatidns, their water Stipp! . Y. has t s been, contaminated . aminated for nearly a decade,. the beautifidl ce : uvft�y p " ide wily be populated by*huma.nity forever and Mbb0__.Wj'j'forr years -over their culpability in the 0.- ly�-dallieg _..matter 6110. prompt solution. The acted homeowiiets, are now indicating their acceptance of the of and who can blame them. It would seem that after'the DEC, h 4.41 M0A#'.C&ig to the bargaining table, forced OW 9W t and compensation, that if Jacksonville. thft to Adtnd e -r' now,tefuseg-j the DEC will opera its palms and Mobil will'fly away faei,er.. Ail Pyrrhic victdtios, have' a grain of happniess in them*i in this. case -that happiness is gkting the eight families ;ompens4ted, for their losses and teMoVed. from atop,a dangOO 4 sitod-tion The funds now offered b�. Mobil should have gone towards a . Jackprtilie water district for the, good of all future go#er.Atio' A toon hve:U66il lbkding over a ghost toWn, Trumansburg Free PressMarch 30, 1988 Mobil Offers Buyout o 8 J-villeB Homes By 1�. - ULYSSES. A buyout by the Oil strong disagreement with the buyout proposal, stating _.Mobil •• corporation of the.eight Jacksonville homes it does nothing to- solve the contamination, problem by a 1979 gasoline spill has been tentatively agreed to by and would leave Ulysses with a situation which may by Mobil. The company informed the- state's have long term economic effect. Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) on "I'm not happy with it," he said "I think it's faulty Wednesday, March 23 that they would seek to decision-making from every point of view." purchase outright the contaminated properties rather The supervisor, who has worked on the problem than underwrite the cost of a limited water district for throughout his incumbency, also- siated�the buyout hamlet. All eight homeowners support the buyout would cost Mobil about $l million --approximately proposal, proposal, to recent conversations with $500,000 far the properties and another. $500,000 in ,according several of the residents, although some would have reimbursements to the state's Oil Spill Fund—and that preferred the water district option. Two additional this amount would just about fund the contem lated water district. p homes may be included in the proposal' when and if it The reimbursements total $480,000 which the state becomes official. The possible settlement would be based on a fair has already expended from their Oil Spill Fund to test and track the gasoline plume. Mobil was expected to market appraisal of,the properties by an independent be charged for these expenditures whether they opted firm. Mobil is expected to increase this appraised 'for the'water district or the buyout. amount to include resettlement expenses for the continued on page 19 households and possibly a hardship compensation for the families. 4 Buyout "I am relieved to sec that something is at least continued - happening " said Penny Calderazzo one of the , homeowners, "although I 'still think there are hurdles to overcome." "I'm very pleased," said Dennis O'Neil, another R affected property owner. "We have been living on top of a gasoline spill—a toxic waste dump—for. abo. it ; nine years and we want out." Calderazzo said that she and' other homeowners would be meeting.soon with.their•lawyers to grepare.a— response to Mobil for when they officially tender their buyout proposal, probably within -the next few weeks unless something unforeseen occurs to alter Mobil's. orally stated intentions. The buyout is a ,private settlement between Mobil ; and the affected homeowners and does not involve the Town- of Ulysses. The DEC will be monitoring developments, between the two parties to be certain the eventual settlement conforms to their standards of fairness. Mobil has announced no definite plans for the area—roughly five acres near the intersection of Route 96 and. Jacksonville Road—although a spokesperson for Mobile stated in an Ithaca Journal article that the homes may be razed. Others involved in the. case suggest that Mobil may sell the homes to the public at a discount or simply leave them abandoned. Ulysses Supervisor Martin Luster has expressed a T'rumansburg Free_ Press March 30, 1988 Luster pointed out that the Ulysses town board had passed a resolution on February 9 calling on Mobil to either fund the water district or, as a last resort, to purchase the affected homes. Luster said he didn't believe the situation had reached the point of last resort and he was disappointed Mobil had decided upon the buyout. No immediate response was being formulated by the board; the upcoming negotiations will be strictly between Mobil and the homeowners. The possible buyout appears the end result of a major push initiated by the residents in October of last year when they formed a citizen's activist -group, the Jacksonville Clean_ Safe Water Association (JCSWA). The group hired two lobbyists, received the backing of State Senator Jim Seward, and travelled to Albany for meetings with representatives of Attorney General Robert Abrams:. Mobil's recent move to settle the nine-year-old problem begah with a March 8. meeting between Mobil,' the Attorney General's office, the Health Department. and the DEC. Mobil was then informed they'should either fund a Jacksonville water district or purchase the eight affected homes. If Mobil refused, the state was prepared to pay for the water district or buyout and then recoup their expenses in court from Mobil. The oil company asked for two weeks to study all relevant data and then informed the DEC of their current buyout proposal. Ic Jacksonville'water dlstr��referdh i' 3 rvr d %�, ' B$ FIIIW'YAIIN J'Jum I Staff - TRUMANSBURG — Despite the opposition of of a majority of. residents: attending a public hearing on a proposed Jacksonville water district, the Ulysses Town Board Tuesday• supported the district and approved a referendum April 29. Ulysses town residents who don't reside -in the village of Trumans- burg will vote at that time on the creation of the district for the ham= let. The motion came after an over- whelming majority of about 70 re$- idents attending the hearing at the high school. displayed their opposi- tion to the district ,with an im- promptu show of hands. Only a. handful raised their hands iii favor of,the 2 -mile by Vz-mile .district, which would -extend in a southeast- erly direction from Trumansburg. The proposed district contains 124 residences, according to Thomas Reitz, president of the Jacksonville Community Association. Ulysses town supervisor Martin Luster and councilmen Carolyn Duddleston, Robert Weatherby, and James 'Vorp'voted for-the--cre- -ation_ of n .tlis ril t;,:Robert.Herrick, was opposed. Vorp's amendment. to -change the proposed sharing of.. the district's cost from a 30=70 split (30 percent of the cost to be borne by those outside the district, 70 per- cent to be borne by those in the dis- trict) to 20-80, was approved, 3-1, with Herrick voting against. Resi- dents of the village of Trumans- burg, which lies within the town of Ulysses, will not participate in the referendum, by law, and will not be sharing in Elie district's costs, also by law. . Gayltga•I,�ko: .. • :. a Yation AL the rfi nG(: wc+uld.�encaur- a $490,b25 water r discrlst 'ague 4n r a d6elopfhent; stiin- would run a 12-inchtttain supply ulate more jobs and iricrease--th line from the village's southern e boundary, in a southeasterly direc- towns tax base, enhance property tion along Route 96, HaIseyville values' and most importantly, pro - Road, Cold Springs Road, back to vide sanitary water for Jacksonville Route 96, then to Swamp College residents. Luster emphasized that Road, Route 96, Jacksonville, non -district residents, even )hough Road, back to Route 96, and then -they wouldn the able to hook up to to Cglegrove Road. _the system, would benefit from the increased tax base and potential for The water district's creation has development. Later, a resident been a town board topic for more pointed out that fire. 'protection than a year. Hunt Engineering'of would also be improved in the dis- Painted Post has done a prelimi- trict, with a hydrant located every nary study of what the project S00 feet. Even if the April 29 referendum would, cost. Depending on which At present, about 50 homeown- passes by its required simple major- bonds. the town .could 'obtain, and ers living within the proposed dis- ity, the creation of the district is some slight variations�ln the pro- trict have -contaminated wells. contingent upon three other items: ject, non -village residents Iiving About five of those homeowners the securing of a $400,000 Housing_ outside the proposed district would own wells polluted with -gasoline and Urban Development (HUD) bear 20 percent of the town's $590,- from a Jacksonville service station Small Cities grant; approval of the 625, share of the cost. Residents in Which has long since been closed. town's bonding plan . by the state, the proposed district Would shoul- The remainder of the 50 have prob- cotroller, and tite continued coop- der 80 percent of the $590;625, lems. with nitrate pollution, caused eration and support of the village by :fertilizers which have seeped of Trumansburg, which will supply ' _ Luster, a strong supporter of the into their wells: The. Tompkins the water from its municipal water project,, opened the -hearing, saying County. Health Department has system. there would be several benefits for documented the pollution, and has tdwn residents, if the waiter district urged the creation of a water dis- Trumansburg gets its water from becomes a realitv. He said the cre. trict. Luster said_ I�, i t.i10,:Sidi :. rriu8-t mvid .-:: l�a�ersf Iii: DICE` SLUMEIThe Post- S+aada, )f warning is posted in front of the former horne of Dennis and Patricia O'Neil in Jacksonville, near Ithaca. The O'Neil ieo —or nine years to get action from the state government. Says Patricia: "The ®EG moves slow — slow reverse." Post Standard Monday, nctober 15, 1989 I Two Decades after Earth Day, New York's Environment Still Shows Signs of a Decline By ROBERT W. ANDREWS The Post -Standard harlotte Lewis wondered why her kids were sick and svhy she was dizzy, bumping into walls. Her back yard in Saratoga County was a toxic dumping ground for General Electric Co. Diane'Heminway's kids were sent home from school, red -eyed, coughing and spitting up: "t called an emergency spill number and tlasy freaked out. A chemical plant less than 400 yards from the elementary school in Niagara County had accidentally released a cloud of methyl isocyanate. ,Tames Ransom spent pleasant days with his father fishing in the 5t. La wrence River like generations of Mohawks before them. Today the fish from the river carry unhealthy loads of PCBs, mirex and diben- aofurans. These are simple stories of ordinary peo- ple and environmental horrors. They are stories of people who called on the state Department of Environmental Conservation to protect their health and environment. And they are stories of peo- ple who quickly lost faith. "You want to believe this agency is pro- tecting our children, but it is not," Hemin- way says. "Aly children were in no way pro- tected. Allowing school children to be anywhere near those toxics is wrong. DEC is no ally." Toxic victims are not alone. Environmen- talists of all stripes — tree -huggers to scien- tists, backpackers to whitewater rafters — say they re fed up with the agency. Municipal offi- cials say the DEC is uncoo- perative and unresponsive. Sportsmen claim the DEC pays lip service to the community of hunters and f ishermen. It has come to this in the nearly 20 years since the DEC was formed by then - Gov. Nelson -Rockefeller. Environmentalists at the time were riding the crest of a popular, national movement. "The goal," recalls Henry Diamond, the state's first DEC commissioner, "was healthy lands and forests and water." But after two decades and billions of dol- lars in spending, questions remain: Has New York come clean? Is the air safer to breathe, the water pure enough to drink? Are givers any better for fishing and swimming? Is the general environment of the state more hospitable? Or is the environment deteriorating and threatening the health and tlse future of its residents? The answers are complex. There have been environmental gains. Skies over urban areas are visibly cleaner, Sewage treatment plants'have reduced pol- lution in numerous bodies of water. That's the picture the DEC is justifiably proud of, but it's not the fall frame. New York's air, water and land are filled with cancer-causing pollutants more persis- tent and more threatening than ever before, The rapid loss of natural resources startles environmentalists. And the state bureau- cracy is staggering under the weight of problems so numerous and -so complicated that, as environmentalist Tony Lapsno of Buffalo says, "The DEC is like an emer- gency room in the Bronx." The environmental crises threaten to place the Empire State on an endangered Iist all its own. This series of articles will show that it is perhaps more true today than it was when Rockefeller said it in 1970: "Man is rapidly destroying his awn environment." Dick. Coogan,. a member of the Jacksonville Community ' dents of the Ulpssa hamlet are concerned about the safety of Associadon; sits in front of empty -properties . along the buildings and the area's water wells after a I979gasolbie Jacksonville Road, off 'of ,Route 9S. Coogan and other resi- Leak at a nearby Mobil gas station. Ithaca Journal Saturday, March � 1999 20 years after gas leaks J lc so�tv�l ��gas �pilis E.1 Most heavily concentralud areas contaminated we l l water -�� ®Vacant houses p�� ;. +� •' ' o Recovery well 1 ■ m Recovery trench Jacksonville residents still • . ��'� •' Yy"r<dA. mss: ffi,_ i }� s: a- 96 lin fbr:str� seutians Y. { Methodist By LAUREN BISHOP �. ' �: Afteryears of unsettled law- Episcopal JournalSraJf 'suits, carbon fillers and bottled Charch Mubil bought out riewater —'IventyJACKSONVILLE homes and the residents ,. years ago this month, state offr-• .. •- �,.` ►vhpsewells had become can(am- • _ , �;�6s � �;; . �•,,�.�• cials found that there bred been ; } inated moved awa ,gut$: _ : R="c` gasoline spill at -the Mobil W-Mce ; . ,.. Y' a�� ; � Bks But even with a groundwater y uta 1 - , o station an the corner of i (t � �k111e 'fttrmar�sburg {IZaute.9G) and' F "_.Ye aturent system was even- ' - City baa Road trrally installed, six of [lie homes 'Jacksonville [cads Ithaca Map of vie spilt area from 2989, alter treatment system Inas installed _�--remain Vacant becausewhile the The spill; caused by a faulty . -Ievels of conlanunation have source: 9lasfand & Houck Engineers - RONSON SIAGIF/loumal Staff ronuectinn at an underground ', _,been decreasing, (lye spill still--- (does till - tank, was first detected when rdves,r}ut meet stale cleanup stare- ' some residents.across Uie street, ` dards: And recent monitoring -:residetits wel is to make sure tliey . saw.' her name .in a newspaper from•tlfeslatiari noticed.that• rdata frons thatsystem irrdiiates- weren't contaminated, including article shocked her. . tlaeirwaler sutictled like gasoline.ere,maybe a new spill.— one belogging to Jacksonville res- ' Fortunately, her •$U -fool deep An estimated 4,000 gallons had idem Diane liiituari. well, which is opposite. file plume, seeped intodie groundwater of Initial response resp It turned out. that Hillman's showed no evidence of gasoline (helbwn of Ulysses liamlet, and wasn't, but the fact that she was contamination. -would eventually contaminate After the settlement, Mobil included in (lie agreement — die%veils of at least eight homes.was required to test rive other which she learned about after she See WATER, 5A per!® M MOM wmmm� 1-979 fuel spill still.; a problem.* in.Jackslonville (Continued from Page 1A) But now, the sic empty houses are a painful, constant reminder of the sill. Until the levels of .contamination detected in monitoring wells meet state guidelines — or until Jack- sonvipe gets a municippal water "M --those houses cant be reinhabited. "Those empty houses just create a sense of desolation and abandon- ment,;`she said. "It's very'hanl not to feel damaged" -Aftei the spill was detected, the New York State Department of Transportation and the New York State Department of. Environmental Conservation took samples to deter- mine the extent and levels of contami- nation, while Mobil provided boiled water and carbon filters to the,affect- ed residents. A recovery well was installed at the gas station in 1980: But by then, the spill had already spread to several more homes. In 1987, after another spill from a leaking tank at the station in about 1985, the DEC installed a recovery well and trench and an air, stripper along the east side of Route 96 and three recovery wells along the direction of the spill. The system uses highly pressurized air to remove carcinogenic compo- nents of gasoline called benzene, toluene and xylene from the ground- water. The treated groundwater then flows into a tributary of Cayuga Lake.' The three tanks and piping and about 2,000 tons of contaminated soil were removed from the station in 1987. . • "Meanwhile; Elie `town :Uimet severaltimes with. enneeFs to find ways. bf bringing a municipal ' watei system to the h>imlet. But U.S. Department of Housing and Urban' Development grants applications that would hhve funded a systerp were rejected, and residents in the rest of the) own overwhelmingly, opposed the nearly $1 million system, which would have meant a iubstaritial tax increase. Hillman remembers feeling betrayed by the community, and once stood up at a public heating in anger. "I said, `Were not asking for This water so we can fill our swimming Is,"! she said. ``This is not a lwany. This is drinking water. This is •some- thing absolutely essential." Beconung increasingly frustrated with what they saw•as the lack of help from public officials and agencies, . Jacksmvi'lie homeowners formbd the Jabksoriville Clean Safe Water Askd- ation in October 1987 and demanded that government officials and agencies find them a clean water source. At- one point, they picketed a meeting of the county Health Department's board A settlement between Mobil and New York state was finally reached in July 1988. Mobil agreed to buy out seven•homa (one homeowner bought. his home back two years later), con- duct a full-scale field investigation to determine the extent of the pollution and come up' with a permanent cleanup plan. Mobil also agreed to reimburse the state's oil spill fund for X4801000, the sum the DEC had spent on the cleanup. Hillman doesn't blame -the resi- dents'for accepting the buyguts and moving out. In fact, after years of s"We, they were what most of the i residents waited. : ley h:4 a limited number o1 options,",thsaid.'�Iieir fist respotr srbiii'ty was to their faiiiilies. It was Jug :a ramble position for people to Ue 7 ; .Other water problems Residents of the hamlet have other concerns abbut the water; beyond those connected tothe spills. Hillman's well *has colifoi rn on indiratipn of fecal contamination) and sulfur. She filters the water and bogs it for coffee and tea. She said most peo. pleMri the hamlet don't drink the water ;tall. 'Mist's just the way it is;" she said . 'Jodi and'Michael Marshall have also had problems with their well. Jodi Marshall estimated that they, have spent upwards of $5,000 to in their water potable, including digging the well up several times and installing a chlorinator, a carbon-block'f lt6r and a softener.. - •'ii'he Marshalls have lived in their home,for 25 years — long•eno witness the struggles their nei problems ugh and the ensuing wmer "I was frustrated, and I've been frustrated ever since," Jodi Marshall said. "The water question comes up every four or five years, and then it gets dropped just as fast." She would like to see an affordable water system in the hamlet, which she thinks could raise the value of their home. "If we had municipal *ater, initially the costs would be high, but eventually I think it would pay for itself;" she said But other residents are happy with the way things are. Robert and Nancy Leach, who moved into their Jack- sonville Road home in 1984, had their water tested after they saw an article in a local newspaper- - r The tests revealed the carcinogens benzene and',toluene. They had car- bon filters installed, -and when the set- tlement was reached with Mobil, the Leaehes received $37,000 and free bottled water. They're stil..receiving it every month:- . But•1their water isn't completely free of problems. "If you live in Jacksonville, you have sulfur and you -have iron," Robert Leach said.. "But as far as gasoline byproducts, we're confident that we're clear." Leach said he is not involved in any efforts to get water now, but he thinks high -costs -would make a wafer system even less feasible now than before. "fret actually satisfied with the way things are now," he said. "The status quo:is fine with me." Economy effects I. The lack of a water system may also be affecting real estate: Jim Gulledge, who has been trying to sell his house one mile south of Jacksonville for about a year, said municipal water would help his house'sell while bene- fitting the overall economy on the west side of the lake. Gulledge also ran the Pleasant Grove Bed and Breakfast from his home until Decem- ber. nt — 14v —Sufi—many residents and business owners feel that that goal won't be met without a.municipal water system. "They may have the land use plan, but without water it's nothing," Hill- man said- "They're not going to get any development." Commercial use in Jacksonville would be limited at best, said Town of Ulysses zoning officer Alex Rachun. "Jacksonvibe is considered a hub, but it's a hub that has a lot of vacant homes," Rachun said. ".Those houses aren't going out a clean bill of health ... clean wells or a water district." Jacksonville Community Associa- tion member Dict: Coogan agreed - "I think anytime you have a row of houses that are not inhabited, it has an adverse affect on sales," he said.. "Quite frankly, I would just hope that Exxon comes in and level the ground." In December, Exxon and Mobil announced that they would merge. However, what will happen to the homes is uncertain because the, merg- er has not yet been approved and is still being reviewed by regulators, said Mobil spokesman Michael Robinson. Mobil i still maintaining the proper- ties and paying ,property taxes, Rachun said. , Legal complexity It may seem incredible that so j much time went by before cleanup . began, but it's not unusual; said DEC Spokesman Sam Theinstrom. "These -cases can be legally com- plex," he said. "We try to get them cleaned up as quickly as possible, but it's definitely not unheard of forsome- th'tng to take a number of years." Tliernstrom also said Gov. Pataki formed a working group of advisers in August to review and make recom- mendations on refinancing and speed- ing up the state's cleanup programs, including its oil spill fund, which the DEC used to cleanup the Jacksonville i spill. The spiu Rind's current operating costs are. now.approaching $30 mil - Ithaca Journal. Saturday, March 5, 1999 lion,'but its current revenues from taxes, fines and penalties is only X14 to - $16 o$15 million. But ' be'rnstrom stressed that the DEC will go ahead with cleanups, which the spill fund pays for only when the DEC can't compel responsi- ble parties to pay for cleanups them-. selves. Possible new spills The DEC now believes there may be another spill at the eastern bound- ary of the same site, which ss now a BP 1 .gas station. In the last few years, the monitoring data from the site of the treatment sys- tera have shown elevated concentra- tions of gasoline additive MTBE, methyl tertiary -butyl ether. MTBE has been shown to cause cancer in lab ani- mals, but there is no tkderice that it causes cancer in humans.' However, it may cause nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, dizziness and mental confusion in some people, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Mobil claims MTBE was never con- tained in the gasoline before 1982 when ii Owned the tanks at the station, and has concluded it must be from a new spill, said Chris Maines, an envi- ronmental engine -,7 in the DEC's Syracuse division of environmental , remediation. MTBE has been also been detected at the monitoring wells near the vacant houses, possibly from- " the spill in the mid -Sas, but the recent spike indicates another pos E.ZT 151 T sii anigroun ater samples between the pump islands and Route I 96 lase -fall showed a visible petroleum product and MTBE concentrations of 20,471 -parts per billion, Mannes said. State MTBE guidelines are 50 ppb. "Chances are, it hasn't migrated any further," Marines said. "Mobil's system is operating and therefore intercepting the new spill." After collecting its samples; the DEC asked the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y., which owns the BP sta- DEC is now waiting to hear'-froni the Buan Blue Ox President Neil Bartle said he doesn't believe there's been a new, spill since Blue Ox took over the station. When the DEC first told the company of the increase in MTBE, it tested the tanks and found no leaks, Bartle said. Bartle also pointed to the new elec- tronic lecttropic monitoring system and double-• walled tanks that had been installed by the, time Blue Ox began, leasing the station from a private owner around 1992 Blue Ox bought it in 1994, and Bar- tle said he will pay for the cleanup if it's his, but he wants to make sure the contamination isn't from one of sever-' al previous owners. - "If there's an issue there, we want to see it taken care of as much as any- body else," he said The high MTBE concentrations could also be due to fluctuating groundwater levels, Bartle -said. But. Mannes said that while the DEC thought this could be the cause initial- ly, high concentrations continued to appear after the tanks were tested But determining responsibility will be difficult because of the numerous spills frorn. the site: Regardless; There's a problem there, and it has to be addressed," Mannes said: • • - . 'There, were other problems in Jack- sonville acksoinale with. ills from undetermined sources, In 1986, monitoring a a showed 7ffiat a separate, spill could be "l was frustrated_ , and. I've ,l . - een :frustrated ever , since.: The water. question Jacksonville's future comes up every four or beginning five Years,-. and then -it Efforts are again to get water to Jacksonville. Resident Diane gets dropped just as Hillmim and a handful of other Jack - sonville residents are involved in a fast.' water committee that's part of the I" Jacksonville Community Association -- Jodi Marshall, a Jacksonville in the hopes•that the hamlet will even - resident who has had problems hially get a municipal water system. ' with her well • "We have to continue to move for- ward to provide water from a clean and.reliable source to everybody • there," Hillman said , coming from an abandoned gasoline In addition to the water committee, tank at the site of the old Jacksonville Town Supervisor Doug.Austic is Variety. Store, just north of the station expecting price estimates from three `on Route 96, but a home with a conta- engineering companies that would minated well across the street from study different ways to bring in water. the old store was eventually included The most likely option is Bolton in Mobil's buyout. • • Point in Ithaca, which could also pro - In 1985, a kitchen tap sample at591 vide water fo'r other town residents, Jacksonville Road, south'of the gas Austic said. station and the direction of the spill, - And state Assemblyman Marlin,. revealed high levels of benzene,�- Luger, D -125th District — who was toluene and xylene. irtLvaSesTown S i m 1984 A carbon filtration system waste said he has told Austic a will installed and subsequent -testing support any water -related grants the showed lower levels, but a report on town applies,for- the cause or source of the oontamina- Luster considers himself one of . . tion graved inconclusive. The possibility of new MTBE cont- original supporters of municipal water in Jacksonville. He said when l►e-was .. amination concerned Walter Hang, supervisor that, dhythiag less than president of Toxics Targeting in Itha- ca, which maps and profiles spills -and • municipal water in the hamlet was only the illusion of a solution, some - other toxic sites across New York for thing he still believes. engineering consultants,. government agencies, financial institutions, atter- still feel strongly that Jacksonville , neys and homebuyers. Hang said will remain a semi-ghost,town until a' water system is brought there," he MTBE is water soluble and can migrate far from the origin of the spill. He added that groundwater plumes in general can be extremely complicat- ed, splitting into smaller plumes and going in all different directions. "The most important action, when ' it comes to remediating big- gasoline i spills, is to avoid delay,". Hang said "If you wait, the problem gets bigger." s<_ .........""-- -- - ! .1•• ti . . 7 • Digv cups i • J e ��n,ja�on The wotercommittee'of the community association meets once month o The Jacksonville Community ' Association met for their monthly meet- • The water committee for the Jacksonville Community Association ing recently to plan several Itdms of . meets once a month and consists of five mon• residents who are active on the commit - Concerns over water problems in the locale continue to be on the agenda for tee. Their next meeting is April 22. They also association members. Suzanne wM report at the association`s next regular business meeting. Motlierall, who works with the Cornell Cooperative Extension * In other Association news, there is a : . Community possibility that a small faizners' market Links Program, continues to attend meetings to help solve whatever issues -will be built on Route 96, near Ulysses Square. Six to eight local farmers from are important to the community. the 71•umansbuig area would sell their The hamlet is looking for alternative produce should the market be estab- sources of water. One alternative is to fished. It may open as soon as the -pump water- from T -burg to month of May. # Jacksonville. Trumansburgis now look- ing for a community well, but it would The community is invited to an Arbor. Day and Earth Day celebration ' - cost $2 million to establish. Jacksonville - in Jacksonville April 24. See story page i can dig thein' own well a few thousand feet down S. to lake level or the hamlet can And, a park cleanup day is being pull water from Ithaca. The Town of Ulysses has three engineers developing , scheduled again for this spring or sum- j proposals that will tell how much engi- neering groups will charge for studies, mer. The public is encouraged to attend continued on page 16 j Trumansburg Free Press April 14, 1999 W on v�l1e eeKS'�id Wang =• ��:: � .... •: s � � - "" Funding proposals for.the hamlet ore more likely,if residents state specifically what they need BYGItACE ia+oiF'"� ': �'`'""= '...''" -the -Post Office for Jody ' � • • Marshall; 'add -•i "Make a list of wants. This advice ^~ " ' 'them to posted list or � them to Grace Wolf at PO Box 218.. has been'rgiven -to "the Jacksonville Community Association by Suzanne Discussion' also returned to munici- Motheral, advisor from the Extension Servi town pal water for Jacksonville. Austic cau- tinned that it will take time, perhaps as .and Austi,supervisor Doug much as ten years, because there is a At the April 15 meeting'of the assdci- chance that municipal water will' be anon, Austic repeated that the hamlet is managed on a regional basis. The study needed for a water more -Lely. to be included g in funding Proposals if residents'comb up. with a proposal awaits funding, but must be done first. 'The list of specific wants. Those can- then be turned into a proposal with the help of next water committee .meeting will be on April 27, and May 20 is the county Planners. When this preliminary date of the next Jacksonville Community Association meeting. work is completed, the town can include the Jacksonville proposal in applications Tom Reitz, president of the associa- for grants like the Transportation Enhancement Act. tion, announced that the tentative date for the park cleanup and dish -to -pass is Some of the ideas mentioned at the the third -Sunday in June. A new picnic meeting included sidewalks and relining table in the park was make by Dave Gell route 96 where it passes through the hamlet. Everyone at the and his Black Locust group. Julie Jordan and Dick Coogan are meeting agreed to come to the next meetingwith a list working on the plan for a Jacksonville ' f��� market. Most likely, they of ten items that will enhaitce1fe will in Jacksonville. Others are invited to suggest a Jacksonville Day event for this make up their lists and drop them off at year Trumansburg Free Press April 21, 1999 Ithaca Journal April 21, 1999 EDrrORTAL t .,j .. onvflks .water world a mtxuiL 91. item . Why N p , remains the o viable and safe solution . The key jobs'far any gaveinment:revolve around pubilic works and safety issues. In that regard, various levels of bureaucracy haven't done doing right by the people of Jacl�oiiviile. . For toolong, the'residents of this crossroads hamlet -in the'heart of Ulysses have had to worry about: water quality. A series of underground spills from a gas sta- tion prenously released thousands of gallons of gaso- line into the hamlet's groundwater and contaminated private wells. Ten years ago, Mobil Oil was forced to buy several homes whose wells were contaminated. Six of them remain vacant today. Ten years'later, there are more questions than answers about local water quality. There also remainsastunning lack of details about a 1997 spill — the fourth since 1971— and its impact on the hamlet's groundwater. Jacksonville residents have been given short shrift thrbughout this tangled process. At this juncture; a concerted push toward creating a municipal water sys- tem is the only responsible solution. . This chaotic story is best illustrated by the fact that in 1988, a Jacksonville resident asked the federal Agency for Tooac Substances and Disease Registry to -assess the quality of the hamlet's water. The agency finally issued a 13 -page report last week The person who had originally asked for the study died �. during its 14 -year compilation. Gratefully, there: is some progress being made today t toward developing a safe and controlled water system. Two engineenng companies have submitted bids for doing a hamlet -wide water study. Jacksonville Com- munity Association' om- munityAssociation President'ibm Reitz is meeting i this week with Mobil Oil representatives in hopes of getting more definitive groundwater data Most impor-tantly, there is a growing, collective vision toward mod- ernizing a hamlet that has potential, if needed changes are made. Assemblyman Martin Luster, D-lZth Distr4 — a former Town of Ulysses Supervisor — says he'll sup- port any water -related grants the town applies for, adding, "I still feel strongly that Jacksonville wi11 remain asemi-ghost town until a water system is L brought there." ' Town of Ulysses Zoning Officer Alex Rachun says, `. "Jacksonville is considered a hub, but it's a hub that has a Iof of vacant homes. Those houses aren't going to be marketable without a clean bill of health." Tb bring an end to this unfortunate chapter in Jack- : sonviIle history, government agencies and private interests must work together in.a timely fashion. ' Kudos to those hamlet residents who have stuck it out and worked together toward positive change _ in the J jf(o�r�mp of a Mmucipal water system— on this troubling N Sgo 0 As residents of Jacksonville we were very glad to see the in- depth sdepth articles ("Trouble Waters," March 6, Page lA and "Feds: Jacksonville spill should- n't affect health," Page lA, Aril 16) concerning the Mobil Oil gasoline Ieak and resulting problems it has mused. Howev- er, oweyer, we would suggest that the scope of the issue, its conse- quences and the importance of its resolution were underesti- mated. Jacksonville is not an isolated place on the far side of the plan=' et and the problem is not limit- ed to our hamlet. The containi- nation directly affects all resi- dents of the Town of Ulysses, Tompkins County, and the Cayuga Lake watershed. The six vacant properties in Jacksonville are a considerable loss since no families can live there, and the land is essentially "condemned." This means less tax revenue for the Trumans- burg School District since Mobil • pays taxes on properties with a low assessed value. The empty deteriorating houses contribute to a setise of decline that further affects the tax base by suppress- ing sales and selling •prices of homes in the hamlet. . - This town must attract busi- nesses as well as moderate and upper income residences. It can- not depend on residential prop- erty alone. However, there can- not be any growth in the Town of Ulysses until the water issues are resohved. Besides that, the current water is unstable and needs to be addressed for the well-being of everyone in the area. It will become increasingly difficult to attract people to spend their money on housing in a town with a minimal tax base and no firm plans to provide clean water for the inhabitants. Trumansburg is already hav- ing problems meeting the exist- ing needs of the village for pure water. We now have a land pian, but arty increase in buildine any- where in the Town of Ulysses without municipal Water means another well into an aquifer that is already being depleted too rapidly and another septic sys- tem that further Pollutes the ground water that is part of the Cayuga watershed. Thanks to the press (The Ithaca Journal and the Tru- mansburg Free Press) for their help informing the people in Tompkins County and in the Cayuga watershed about the his- tory and current difficulties with thi water in our area. The good news is that the recent resurgence in interest has encouraged local citizens, coun- ty aeeactes, and elected officials to begin working together to find a resolution to the water issue; when the Department of Environmental Conservation and Mobil get back into the pic- ture in a positive way, it will speed up the progress that is already in the works • . Richard Coogan and Diane Hlllmann Jacksomfle, April 21 ;Jacksonville, Mobil bcg.i.`n-,`-_'SPffl .. • By RICHARD �C. BLACK Special to the Journal t JACKSONVILLE — The presi- dent of the Jacksonville Community .;Assddadon had good news Wednes- day.night for residents of this hamlet who have been adversely affected by numerous fuel spills over the past 28 :yew ' Tom Reitz -said at a meeting of the association's water committee that he and three other officials met with rep- resentatives of the Mobil Oil Corp. April 21 -to discuss both the- current status of Jacksonville's groundwater and future efforts to'dean it up. "It's the first contact that we have had with (Mobil) in seven years and I was absolutely pleased .with it," said. Reitz:.' While he admitted that no definite r agreements were reached at the meet- ing,.Reitz did feel that just starting a ., .dialoque with Mobil was an important. step m resolving the hamlet's long- standing groundwater.problems. • According. to Reitz; the following officials -were also present at the meet- ing:• Ulysses Supervisor Douglas Aus- tic, Zoning Officer Alex Rachun, and ohn Andersson of -the Tompkins County Environmental Health office. In 1971, 1979 .and 1986, under- ground spills from a gas station at the corner of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road, once. ownedby Mobil, released - thousands of gallons of gasoline into Jacksonville's groundwater and subse- -queritly. contaminated private- wells in the area. - Nlobil sold the station in 1982 and now owned_ by the Blue Ox Corp. - open meeturg with the. officals for the of Oxford,. N.Y., as both a BP gas sta- week of May 20. ! tion- and Nice 'N' Easy.convenience store. Tlid New York State Department of Environmental Conservation began cleaning up the spills in 1987 and Mobil -eventually agreed to buy seven. houses through a consent agreement that it reached with -the state -,in 1988. One resident eventually bought back his house, but six are still. vacant because the wells remain contaminat- ed. . The DEC has since identified a . new spill, which it says occurred at the station's pump island in 1997. Both Mobil and Blue Ox claim the spill isn't their responsibility. According to a December report by DEC -contracted engineers, soil samples- taken near the gas station found concentrations of gasoline com-' ponent MTBE ranjing from *339 to 39,865 parts per bilhon, and levels of the carcinogens benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and.xylene, collectively known as BTEC ranking. from 152 to 260,060 parts per billion. Floating petroleum product was also visible in the -groundwater. As -•a result of -last Wednesday's meeting, members.of.the .commudity association's water committee hope tharthe next couple of -weeks will prove to be a key moment 'to .take definitive action .on the contamination problems and to-possii ly bring a miinicipai water supply to the area. The water committee also hopes to work with the Ulysses Planning Board and with Austic to make the municipal water supply a reality. It's planning an Ithaca Journal Thursday, April 29, 1999 Water for Toyvri W -M Cost _ Money and Talcoe.Thne its• not Jacksonville, it's the whole town; and beyond, Town Superivisor DougAvstic Says &X Gk4CEW,6LF ,The:��'��.,���nyille Cam.muna•t.y AsdO6,%A4n ;.sted a meeting .te deal with waer'issues.on May -20 at Close' Hall -in Jacksonville. Discussion cen- tered on what the town is -doing to pro- vide an Improved water ;$upply for.. Jacksonvil14 ke'on* . .Chaired by water committee head Diane Salman; the meeting providdd-a forum for questionb And answers about• plans -to improve the w9ter supply. Town' Supervisor Doug A.ustic,- County Enviromi3ental Health Director John A.ndgraon; County Representative Petor Benninm and planning • board mem* Xm—Cail responded to a;.3ist of questions drams up bymember•¢'of}e water•cobuiiittee. The lust step to get a'gMt or'loau is { a stt*ydithe •townt$ needs-ind pbs$ib]e' .-solu;�ions. • . �'`,�i` �'�. • `. g' ilii of _ Barton and 'Ttakdid%�v 'has. die contract to dQ tt e'Uljrs'sb$ stydy, which will cost $11,70Q, Supei f}i• Austic $aid that he has been a'46 by le gator Marty Luster .that, w en Jhe ate budget .is ,finally passed, Ltil tex will bap, 4.7.0 to release moin6y -to -pay for •the Water study. In addition to the study for bringing in water, the engineers hai#e been a$ked to make a study of providing -sewers for matQY $25,009. Th '.Ops axe sepa-. rate,' hut. if. bdth -v&( -Viid sewer, --are approved, the lines could be installed at 'the same time,, resultuig in economics in .construction costs. A solution is being sought, said Austic, not just for Jacksonville's water lreeds,' -but town -wide' and perhaps kjeyond. . • - .. . There is •a need to be a little far- sighted, to :see that there may be other probldins down the line and provide for them. Keys Cael pointed out that the . state looks favorably ori intei ri�unicipal- waterr,W :organizations: binding for some projects can come from 'federal' or state grants •dr from bonds which are paid from. local taxes, said.At.deze�n, -designates projects f.oz •tl►e Ir revolving loan fund. Th4. prgject must be cpm .tgly:plaAned• an-d.:�r+gr be ' :to start as soon as'ii is undgrl; he acice8► Anderson said that the couaty ha-s'a water 'resource council and has funded . an aquifer study as part of the water quality strategy plan, He Minitted that .the county isnot doing a lot to educate the public *on water issues, but there care '-sources fdr••the information, Udluding Sharp Ande'rs-on, educator at the Exte iiigtAervice. - Resitlents•- than questioned the the town. The cost of both studies or providing sewers would -be approxi- continuert on page 16 Trumansburg Free Press May 26, 1999 Water' continued' - amount of input the -public would h into -the project. Approval of the'la project like this water proposal is s ject to public, referendum, 'Aut explained, as -well as -public- hearings along thkline. In response to allegations of hold "secreta' meetings, Austic said that. i• sometimes . more efficient to hold .� .during conversations, as for examl when discussing funding for the wa study Austic said -that the project is lot term, There will probably not be a v this -year; it will. be two to three ye: before Vre%Tdng .ground. Don' Sola, Swan2F liege Road,urged that t 'boaid make•pure•that everybody in 1 ..to** I tYdlved and that the plan. mi wafer needs for 20 years from'now. N'chair'dlmari asked that 1 vaean propel es•'in Jadksonville wh were chased by the - Mobil 't CAm'en _the spill was dem Zbwn . bR Qr Alex Rack said '. � is meetingAe terns the agx'__ Iteeping p #he-htiuses s2' 1»: .�13ey hep- up the m - �,ir J e liotiBesv XQ woulillnefit from •geitingii� P,. �,. ,.:l e;pointed.out,.: r.. Dinds. No.'. lei - in W.. . l f seven evo,cuoted h6 nes ore to be reinhabited,. tvwr2 'shauld�get : municipal water: :. - . & G&4CE -WOLF leve, xylene; � et'hylene• and metkryl ter, The US.' 1?ublic 'health . Sexvice on . ,�' butyl .ether were present, but' were below levels of health concern..,, June 9,.1999;'published a -report about However, in. 19$8 seperi families FasolirPe that. sps'�ed at a .Jacksoiiv a were.relooated, Mobil..0i1 Co - - 7 ::1 :gas station from.197V.fd 1987..'A1997 .•. ' ri°' i'heir-boines and all,but one still stand . = ap'>l is stili being evaluated. vaoartt...e report; of the Agency .for If the seven homes with contaminat- '!We Substance an8 bisease Registr3 . ed water are to be habitable again, the, (A`SDFiJ advises residents not to relo- rep •.ort recommends that the town gets cate to cor iwwnated,residences at this municipal water supply instead of rely . time. - I they should wish to relocate in ittg .on Private. wells... The wells ,still the future, they should contact the local• don`t test -clear.' A deeper well was dug eall+h departrnent. • .The one resident at of the hoznea, l ut'the water stili who recur e'd brings iui water- -from didn't pass drinking water standards.- • .another toff for eoolang:and :drinking. - Aresiclent of Jacksonvillerequested• The eoininunity contuiues to be con - au irivestigatiori of the.effects'of gases _ • earned with the site and related health rule leaks 1n.1971, 1979 and 1986. In .issues.' Jacksoinvilie residents want'to 19'19;, the'largest spill occurred: t1iow_whether the contaniiiiation-.c:an Approximately 4,OUp to 10,000 gallons be ' totavy removed.. In 1987, three ' of gasoline were.released. This led to i nderground gasoline. storage tanks the .contamination of groundwater and ',, and approximately 2,000 tons of conta� priYate wells serving 98 persops.in sett- .. - . en homes. The report states that tuo- ' cohtinked do page'17 Trumansburg Free Press June. 30, 1999 . con#iued`,' 'minated soil were.•removed near. 'tl: tanks: Mobil Oil has be'en•remediatin the contaminated ground ' water sine -.988 liy a recovery treatment syster Mobil conducts.rnonthty,.quarterly:ar: annual samplings of groundwatei: ' The. report states *.the Highest col centrations of benzene,: tuolene ar xylene were located. at two homes dm gradient horn the service statjo: .The'se, a_re-. -naw : among 'the empi .homes. ..one•• conclusion - that the ATSD arrives at•is that the gniieveloped pro; arty*. in the path. of •the eontarninat( groundwater plumemay, be corita& nated now, or'in the future. The.phm is currently moving in a north.to nort -easterly direction; • away frvm..existir •hones and toward'presently .andeve oped'argas. • The'agency's recommendations ar first, that residents should not reloca to contaminated residences;until a sa source:.otliHnking. water is .a aikab and indoor air is.&ampled for poUnti volatile organic. compounds._ Secon alternatiye.sources-ofwater (municipg should • be provided ' to - homes wi- ' domestic wells, that have contan roan detected abave,lieKlih.comparison-v. ues'. .-Third, the - New• York . Sta Ulysses finds estimates for water system too high The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Bishop, Lauren Date: Aug 11, 1999 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 512 Document Text By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff ULYSSES - A municipal water system for the Town of Ulysses could cost anywhere from $$@$!4.2 million to $$@$!5.8 million, a recent draft study says. But town officials think residents would find the projected annual costs too hard to swallow and are telling the study's engineers to go back to the drawing board. Aside from a few properties, Ulysses is almost entirely serviced by private wells. Many residents have water quality and quantity problems, particularly in the hamlet of Jacksonville, where several fuel spills from a gas station in the 1970s and 1980s contaminated private wells and rendered seven homes uninhabitable. In May, the Ulysses Town Board commissioned Barton and Loguidice Consulting Engineers of Syracuse to conduct an $$@$!11,700 study of possible sources for a town water system. Water studies have been done before, but grant applications to fund a system have been unsuccessful, and many residents weren't willing to pay higher taxes for it. Town officials don't think residents would be willing to pay the annual fees estimated in this newest study, either. If the town doesn't receive any grant funding for the water system and instead takes out a 38 -year loan with a 4.5 percent interest rate, residents in the water district could pay anywhere from $$@$!1,269 to $$@$!1,808 yearly. The water study examined four potential sources of water for a municipal water system: Cayuga Lake, a new groundwater supply, the Town of Ithaca's water supply and the Village of Trumansburg's water supply. The system proposed by the study would deliver water to Jacksonville and homes along Route 89 from Crowbar Point to the Ithaca town line. The study says drawing water from Trumansburg, at $$@$!4.93 million, would be most cost effective. In addition to annual operating costs, it would cost the town $$@$!75,876 per year to buy water from the village. Communities can receive grants for water systems, but they usually don't qualify unless their median household income is less than $$@$!32,965, the study says. Ulysses has a median household income of $$@$!33,133, according to the 1990 U.S. Census. But town officials believe the lakefront properties along Route 89 might have pushed up that number. Supervisor Doug Austic said he has asked Barton and Loguidice to investigate delivering water to Jacksonville and homes along Route 89 separately, in case an income survey the town wants to have done shows that the median household incomes in Jacksonville are low enough to qualify for funding. Austic is also asking the engineers to find ways to bring down the cost of a water system. Austic also said Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, and state Sen. John "Randy" Kuhl, R -52nd District, secured $$@$!27,000 in state funds to cover the costs of the water study and a sewer study, which is also being conducted by Barton and Loguidioe. Town officials plan a public meeting with engineers from Barton and Loguidice to discuss the study, perhaps next month. Residents can look at the study in the Ulysses Town Hall at 10 Elm St. New York Northeast 1 of 2 111/2/13 2:13 PM Ulysses finds estimates for water system too high - The Ithaca J... LOCAL; Pg. 2A hitp://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doct896729376.htm... Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Many residents have water quality and quantity problems, particularly in the hamlet of Jacksonville, where several fuel spills from a gas station in the 1970s and 1980s contaminated private wells and rendered seven homes uninhabitable. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:13 1'M Jacksonville prepares well awareness month Ulysses hamlet environmental educator fir Cor- nell Cooperative Extension. residents can At 7:30•p.m. tin Thursday. Sept. 16 in the Trumanshurg have Water tested Elementary School cafeteria. U.S. Geological Survey hydrulti- AromJoumalStaff iaP° gist William Kappel will speak about the geology affecting wells The Jacksonville Communtry in the area and what activities Association and Cornell Coop- affect water supply and quality. erative Extension of Tompkins The Well 'awareness month County a=re sponsoring a sones will culminate in a well fair. of programs this month to help 'which will he held at 7:30 p.m. Ulysses residents learn more on Thursday. Sept. 30 in the about theirwelis. Along with the -Jacksonville Community programs. well Church. testing will be Aside from a few Test results offered for arty residents intewill he avail- r- properties, Ulysses ahle 10resi- ined in testing dents who par - their water is almost entirely ticipated in the sources. Some serviced by.private testing pro- funda will be yam available for Wells. Many - Experts will reduced testing he nn hand to fees for low- residents have help interpret income fa nd li Water quality and the text results and suL�_est seniors. , quantity problems, slime stratcaies Tonight's for improving irogram. at particularly in the waier.quaiin•. 1:30•p.m. in the hamlet of Residents will lacksonvillealso have the ' o m m u n i ty Jacksonville, where opportutiiry to :boron, will several fLiel spills talk to each ocus on specif- p other about c information from a Jacksonville how to ti ieeded to improve the nanage a well. gas station in the water situation t n d e r stand 1970s and 1980s in L'i}tks iow it works aside from .nd know what contaminated a few proper - an go wrong. tics: lelvsses is T e s t i n g: private wells. almost entireiv n f o r m a t i o n se:x iG�ti by p_ nd kits will be vale wells. vailable for Ulvsses residents Nlanv residents have water lio would Gleeto participate in quality and quantity prohlums. :sting their wells for common particularly in the hamlet of rohlems Jacksonville. where several fuel Presenters will be Audrey spills from aJackseinville eras sta- �alander. public health sanitari- tion in the 1970s and 19A ctmt- n -for the Tompkins County aminated private wells and run- nvironmental Health Depatx- dered seven homes uninhabit- rent. and Sharon Anderson. able. Ithaca Journal Sep-tetnber 14; 1999 14, T _6 w Watcr hr . ns vets this ' `bAc'- Residents test water, hear•from experts. ori water -issues through September ,• • • BY ELIZABETH REDDICK ' how our actions affect our water's dual- . 'Ity How Well is Your Well? The'- "Well Fair' is slated for, j The -Cornell Cooperative:Extension September 30 in the Jacksonville and 'J a c It s o.n v it I e •C oxa rh u n i t y ,' Community Church at 7.30pm..In addi= • { Asssacistion "nt:you to know. : tion 'to receiving water; test results, ,a Well water events wJIl' be held in. -number.of experts will suggest strate- :. town this September, featuring' guest gies for improvin* water quality. 713is speakers and informational meetings.' event is also intended to gather•'commu- - Maintaining your well, and local• geolo- nity members to talcs about how they gy and aqui%z s will be diacnssed: can work together toimprove and mi}in- . Learn to protect -the titglity of your .,tain good water. Assemblyman Marty water, learn vhy -routine testing in ' -Luster willattend this went. - ' important,.hoav to interpret test results' The Jacksonville -Community and beinttoduced io treatinent optionsAsstit ation,ie co; sparisoring these pFo- • : atthe'programs: grams along with' the' Clarnell Well basits and testing was conduct- . Cooperative�Extension: •ed'on September .l4 at the Jacksonville _ .. Sharon* Anderson, a coordinator of Community Church::Audrey Balander;' the event, explains the programs are. Public -Health Sanitarian, Tompkins located in Jacksonville and.•Ulysses ; �. County Environmental Health' Dept:, because of r�nr� Q �qj+^^.ts have With • ••und-.Sharon Anderson, Environmezrtal their water, although• residents of all jEdticator, ;Cornell Cooperative lohal towns are invited. The topic is OR Extension of lompkiins'County were on . • particular concern toresidents in hand at flits' gathering, as was Katrie Jacksonville because of their history of . r DiTella, Water Quality Educator at' : some problems with their wate4 after a• CornellUniversity. Some residents had . 1970s oil spill contaminated some of the water gathered and tested at thin fist wells there, Anderson says. event; results wM be revealed at -a Well ..:-Ihe prpgram was initiated by the Rak September 30. ' Janksonville ,Community -Association." ~ Two events•- are forthcoming this She explains, many .in Jacksonville September- "Ground' Water;' -Aquifers• thmi*f only the spill -when they' think`of. and Your Well" is the. name of a program their water,, but tbire are things that, At the Truitianabu Elem` entarySchooI they don't know, that is -related to water. on September 16. • William. Keppel, and not the.spiil,.such as local aquifers; hydrogeologist with the US Geological and caring fnr your. weds. Survey, will: present information about Fbr more information.on the event the.geologyaffeWngwells hi this region call Sharon' Anderson. at the Cornell, of*New York state.' He'll also speak on.; Cooperative Exteinsiom at 272 2292. Trumansburg Free Press September 15, 1999 jacics� 'vi1 e W -.Parte gram a Sttcc!es&. Over 40' attended events that centered ori the health of their drink- ing ,water arcrUCZ Wolk Both meetings -of the Jacksonville Community Association and Cooperative Extension Well Awareness .program were attended by over 407res= idents:of jhe Town of Ulysses. The ,first .Well Awareness meeting was devoted to well.health and manage- ment. Held at the 'Community Church in Jacksonville, the meeting was. .attended by an overflow crowd who heard Audrey Balander and Sharon Anderson talk about wells, their man- agement and common problems. Balander is.a public. health sanitarian with the Tompkins County Environmental Health Department, and Anderson is 'an Environmental Educator with the extension service. More than twenty people took well - testing kits home and handed over their samples to Dick Coogan the following morning. These samples will be tested by Buck Labs and the results will be ready for the Well Fair on September 30. Possible contaminants to test for bacteria, nitrates, lead and other conta- minants including chromium, iron and sodium. Each homeowner could choose which tests to have done. The Jacksonville Community T -.Association paid the first ten dollars of the cost of the tests, Buck labs gave the owners a Zb percent discount and homeowners paid the balance. On Thursday,. September 16, William Koppel gave an interesting talk on the• geology of the region and its effects on available water. ' He explained what an aquifer, is,"and the types'.of wells that can tap into water sources. He spoke of what happens when too many people tap into a water source, and how the type of *soil and rock can affect athe amount and quality of water available in the'area. The final meeting in this series,' the "Well Fair," will be at 7:30 on Thurs&3; September 30 at the Jacksonville Community Church. At that time, those whose water was tested will receive the results and experts «ill be available to advise on dealing with any problems that are found. More infor- mation sheets «ill be available at the meeting, and remedies for water prob- lems wiU be discussed. ' - The series of•informational meetings have been eery well attended. They were sponsored by the Jacksonville Community Association and the Cooperative Extension Office. Concern about water quality and avoiding conta- mination of our own wells proves -to be a topic of concern throughout the town- ship'. FINGER LAKES COMMUNM NEWSPAPERS / SEPTEMBER ZZ. 1999 ackon . Re's identrs- y et- lest �esuK . . BY GRACE WOLF In his remarks, J!k praised the . More than forty_ -five Town -of" Ulysses -Jacksonvfile•CommumtyAssdieiation for attended. the. final" Well their -work on Well Awareness. He also ' - .resid-erits Awareness' meeting in'�aeksonv9l.:on pointed out that both. Assemblyman - September :19.. State Assemblyman- Marty Luster ,and State- Senator 'Randy" Kuhn have been:-insturmental NFarty Luster, Town Board member_ Carolyn Duddl.eston and Tow in -obtaining -the needed fdunds for the' . Supervisor Douglas Austic also attend - townwide water and: sewer studies. He `ed.- said the engineers arae still --considering - .After a welcome from Peg , -Coogan wa to: et water to the -town a lower � g - ' and :Diane Hillman, Marty Luster took cost than. -their current estimate. The -the floox_..to compliment community . -engineers will present their findings'at -a public meeting within a..montli, hg, members for,their- initiative in .running added. . the. -program. He congratulated . the ..large number of -residents for partici- Those resideriis who had brought , pating in order to educate themsWe' s water, sarnpies. to be tested were given on.how to maintain a healthy water sup- ` the results• of the tests, and�ieople hada- -chance. ply, to• visit the exhibits. The only In her welcoming remarks,. Ms. water treatment company -at the meet -'- -• Coogan. pointed'out -that the assistance_ in -the was Master Water Conditioning- _ of the Tompkins County Cooperative 4Qorporation. A three-duttlensional mod- • . el manned by Dick Coogan showed Extension Service and :Conimuriitx .how ..waste that might contain contaminants Links.'• facilitator Suzanne • Motheral :can get.into the ground water Another have beeninvaluable:; She also thanked = three-dimensional model showed how. Audrey Ballinger' of the Tompkins water moves:in.the aquifer and what the County Health Department forher pre- different types of:wells look like. :.sentations:atithe meetings, ` The-,high:mtere"st.:n..wellfi and.:their Suzanne :Mothdral . thinked Town, _ sources has enaourag d:the. JCA'tb con- Supervisor'Zloug Rustic for saying At "community side'r a.prograinTfor people io checiC the one point that the has to. take responsibility.and.•figure,this. out.".. health of .their -septic -systems.A i the. spring Motheral. feels that this. -mo* bilized the. JXCA to go ahead with the.program. Trumansburg Free Press October 6, 1999 ,,XZumansbur.g. Free Press MTBE additive levels alarm Jacksonville, DEC The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Bishop, Lauren Date: Nov 11, 1999 Start Page: A.4 Section: LOCAL Text Wont Count: 399 Document Text By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Strict new state standards for a contaminant found at the site of the Mobil gas station - now occupied by a BP gas station and a Nice 'N' Easy convenience store - make Jacksonville's water situation even more critical. This week, Gov. George Pataki ordered the state Department of Environmental Conservation to reduce the amount of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) allowed in surface and groundwater from 50 to 10 parts per billion. MTBE is a so-called oxygenating agent added to gasoline to make it bum cleaner in engines. While its advocates claim MTBE has contributed to a substantial reduction in air pollution, critics claim it can be a health hazard when underground gasoline tanks rupture and MTBE gets into wells and water supplies. But just in the last two years, MTBE levels in Jacksonville have been at least as high as 40,000, which has led the DEC to believe there could be a new spill from the site. Richard Brazell, a Department of Environmental Conservation regional spill engineer, said the DEC met with Mobil representatives Wednesday to discuss the possible new spill. Mobil now operates a system that pumps out and treats the contaminated groundwater. Monitoring wells also keep track of the levels of contamination at various sites in Jacksonville. Mobil contacted the DEC about two years ago because the wells showed an increase in the level of MTBE, and subsequent DEC testing revealed a free-floating petroleum product in the soil near the station. The DEC then asked the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y., which owns the station, to pressure test the gas tanks there. Those tests showed the tanks were "tight," or without leaks. But that doesn't mean there isn't a problem, Brazell said. "There have been incidents where a tank has tested fight and there's been a leak," he said. The DEC believes Blue Ox Corp., not Mobil, is responsible for the new spill. Brazell said Mobil has provided documentation showing that MTBE was not included in its gasoline when it owned the station. "We will be contacting (Blue Ox) Friday about the possibility of getting them involved in taking over the operation of the system," he said. If Blue Ox believes it is not responsible for the spill, the state will take over operation of the treatment system, Brazell said. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 4A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) While its advocates claim MTBE has contributed to a substantial reduction in air pollution, critics claim it can be a health hazard when underground gasoline tanks rupture and MTBE gets into wells and water supplies. I of 2 11/2/13 2:10 PM MTBE additive levels alarm Jacksonville, DEC -'The Ithaca Jo... http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doet896737873.htm... Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Z of 2 11/2/13 2: I0 PM Ulysses taps into water proble The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Bishop, Lauren Date: Nov 11, 1999 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 860 Document Text Municipal system still a goal for Jacksonville By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff ULYSSES - For 11 years, six homes in the hamlet of Jacksonville have stood vacant, uninhabitable because their well water is still contaminated by underground spills from a Mobil gas station that date back more than two decades. The only way the homes, purchased by Mobil in 1988, can be reinhabited is if a municipal water system is established in the town. Aside from a few properties that receive water from the Village of Trumansburg's water system, Ulysses is entirely served by private wells. After several attempts to create a municipal water system in the 1980s failed because of prohibitively high costs to residents, the town is trying again. On Nov. 16, the Ulysses Town Board will hold a public information meeting to discuss with residents the possibility of creating a municipal water system not just for Jacksonville, but for other areas of the town as well. And town officials are going one step further. Acting on a recommendation from Assemblyman Martin A. Luster, D -125th District, the Town Board passed a resolution Tuesday night asking the state attorney general's office to reopen its investigation into the numerous spills that have See WATER, 4A Water (Continued from Page 1A) plagued the hamlet since the 1970s, hoping Mobil will take some responsibility for paying for a municipal water system. "We've considered over the years that this isn't getting any better," said Town Supervisor Douglas Austic. "Municipal water seems to be the only answer, and we want them to reopen the case." Jacksonville resident Tom Reitz agreed. "We'd like to have some kind of an indication from Mobil Oil that they're. willing to do something more than just let them sit there and further deteriorate," he said. Early price too high In May, the Ulysses Town Board commissioned Barton and Loguidice Consulting Engineers of Syracuse to conduct an $$@$!11,700 study of possible sources of a municipal water system in the town. The water study examined four potential sources of water for a municipal water system: Cayuga Lake, a new groundwater supply, the Town of Ithaca's water supply and Trumansburg's water supply. It proposed delivering water to 1 of 3 111/2/13 2:57 PM Ulysses taps into water proble - The Ithaca Journal: Archives both Jacksonville and some homes along Route 89. hup://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896737874.him... The initial study also showed that such a system, from any of the four sources, could cost anywhere from $$@$!4.2 million to $$@$!5.8 million and could cost homeowners from $$@$!1,269 to $$@$!1,808 yearly. Knowing many residents would never approve of such high costs, town officials told the study's engineers to find a way to expand the system's service area and bring down the cost per homeowner. The revised study, which the town received last month, shows three new alternatives that would serve additional homes off Routes 96 and 89 and bring down the cost per user. Outside help sought The study says that purchasing water from the Village of Trumansburg would be the most cost-effective option for the town. But purchasing water from the village in a way that would serve the most homes and be the least expensive for homeowners would also be the most expensive to construct: $$@$!5.7 million. That's why the town can't fund the project on its own. The New York State Drinking Water Revolving Loan Fund provides grants to municipalities to finance drinking water infrastructure projects - but only to communities with a median household income less than $$@$132,965. At the time of the 1990 U.S. Census, Ulysses' median household income was $$@$!168 too high to qualify. But town officials think it's likely that Jacksonville has a lower median household income than the lakefront properties along Route 89, meaning that Jacksonville may qualify for funding for a water system and the Route 89 service area may not. So next week, the town will mail out surveys to about 500 households in the largest potential service area next week to identify the areas of the town that may be eligible to receive grant funding. Most Jacksonville residents, like Dick Coogan, hope that some grant funding will become available for a water system. And even though he's concerned with how many people a water system would actually benefit, he credits a recent well -awareness program sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension with making Jacksonville well owners aware of the benefits of even a small water system. Fewer people on wells would mean more pressure and quantity for those still on, he said. "Part of well awareness was getting people to understand that getting people off the wells makes it better for people who are on the wells," he said. And resident Jodi Marshall applauded the board's request of the state Attorney General's office. "I knew that they were supposed to be doing it, and I was really glad that they followed through on it," she said. "I would like to see some type of resolution to this." Houses boarded up, 4A MTBE levels, 4A Meeting details What: A public information meeting to discuss a municipal water system for the Town of Ulysses When: 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 16 Where: Trumansburg Fire Hall on West Main Street in Trumansburg New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Acting on a recommendation from Assemblyman Martin A. Luster, D -125th District, the Town Board passed a resolution 2 of 3 11/2/13 2:57 PM Tuesday night asking the state attorney general's office to reopen its investigation into the numerous spills that have See WATER, 4A Water (Continued from Page 1A) plagued the hamlet since the 1970s, hoping Mobil will take some responsibility for paying for a municipal water system. Reproduoed with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 3of3 11121132:57 PM Emotions run The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: freile, Victoria E Date: Nov 17, 1999 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Wont Count: 536 Document Text high at Ulysses water meeting By VICTORIA E. FREILE Journal Staff ULYSSES - Ulysses residents voiced their concerns on the possible sources and effects of a municipal water system in the town at an information meeting Tuesday night. "I have nowhere else to get water," said Diane Hillmann of Jacksonville. "I've been told by the health department that my well is dangerous. There are a lot of people like myself who need this." Hillmann, along with other Jacksonville residents, continues to suffer because her well iscontaminated by underground spills from a Mobil gas station that dates back more than two decades. "This oil spill has affected the (buildings) in Jacksonville to the point where you can't even sell them," Hillmann said. "They're worth so little." "I've got 60 acres of beautiful land to build on," said Richard Evans of Perry City Road as he shook his head. "But not without water." One woman at the meeting who repeatedly refused to state her name said she strongly opposed the idea of the municipal water project, because she said she already spent thousands of dollars improving her own water equipment. "I don't want to have to pay the cost of building a system that I don't plan to use," she said. The woman also said she feared the addition of the water system would cause a developmental boom in Ulysses, which in tum would negatively affect her property value. However, Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said with such a boom, the cost of water service would decrease. "It may happen," he said. "In fact, it probably will happen, but you can't plan on (a developmental boom to happen,) because it may not." Rich Straut of Barton and Loguidice Consulting Engineers of Syracuse outlined the water study, which examined four potential sources of water for a municipal water system: Cayuga Lake, a new groundwater supply, the Town of Ithaca's water supply and the Village of Trumansburg's water supply. It proposed delivering water to both Jacksonville and some homes along Route 89. Purchasing water from the Village of Trumansburg would be the most cost-effective option for the town, Straut said. But a system using water purchased from the village in a way that would serve the most homes and be the least expensive for homeowners would also be the most expensive to build: $$@$!5.7 million. That's why the town can't fund the project on its own. The New York State Drinking Water Revolving Loan Fund provides grants to municipalities to finance drinking water infrastructure projects - but only to communities with a I of 2 11/2113 2:47 PM Emotions run - The Ithaca Journal: Archives hitp://pgasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896733-541.htm... median household income less than $$@$132,965. At the time of the 1990 U.S. Census, Ulysses' median household income was $$@$!168 too high to qualify. So next week, the town will mail out surveys to about 500 households in the largest potential service area to identify the parts of the town that may be eligible to receive grant funding. Chris Till, a water resource specialist at the Northeast Rural Community Assistance Program - the corporation administering the survey -said in order for the survey to work, he needs everyone to be honest about their household's gross income on the survey. New York Northeast LOCAL; Ulysses water meeting; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I ... I it probably will happen, but you can't plan on (a developmental boom to happen,) because it may not. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2of2 1112/132:47 PM Ni N Eng-meers Outline • 1ow n Water Supply.Options _ Residents urged to fill out survey questionnaire possible service to residents at the BY GRACE M. WOLFbest lowest possible cost.- For the moment, the decision has been made to start .A solid turnout of Ulysses residents, came to the town water information meeting at the Trumansburg Fire Hall modestly and bring water to the town in on November 16. Most of the audience phases. - The •original engineers' report turned understood that this was an informa- out to be more expensive than Town tional meeting and seemed to be there Supervisor Doug Austic thought tax - .to learn all they could about the pro- payers could support. So -Chris Nill of posed municipal water plan. Several 'RHI came on the scene.. His organiza- members of the. audience agreed with 'tion is a non-profit group that helps rur- Et# Gatch of Jacksonville that decisions al areas get the services they need. The made now to bring in a good supply of first step is to 'find areas that might clean water will affect generations to qua*for grants. -They will do - an come. • A representative from Barton and income survey in (hose parts -of Ulysses to see if they qualify for help to pay for Loguidiee, engineers, explained possi- bringing in the water. ble water routes and alternatives. Several plans -for bringing water to the The places selected for the first town have been considered and areas phase are the Jacksonville. area .and Route 89 from the Ithaca line to Willow for the first water districts have been point..Surveys are -in , the mail to resi- worked out. The goal of the engineers; dents of these areas.. town officials and the RHI (Northeast Rural Community'Assistance Program) Residents are urged to •fill in the could best be summarized as 'bung the continued on page 20 Finger Lakes Community Newpapers November 24, 1999 - 20 FINGER LAKES COMMUNI7y'NEWSPAPERS / NOVEMBER 24, f 9,99 Town Water continued questionnaires immediately and send them in. Stamped addressed envelopes are provided. Information given remains completely confidential. In the event not all the surveys are returned, volunteers will go out to collect the sur- veys. A very high percentage return is necessary to qualify for grant money. If water is purchased for Trurgansburg, the costs are as follows: if only Jacksonville is served, with 110 homes; the cost will be 1.8 million dol- lars. If Jacksonville and -the Route 89 homes are served, the cost will be 4.2 million dollars. User costs will range from $740 to $812 per year. After 30 years, the bond will be paid off. The cost of connecting the home to the water main will be borne by the homeowner. Thus, if your home is set back 200 feet, you will pay more to install pipes than if your house is only set back 50 feet from the main. Some people not included in the des- ignated areas asked how they could obtain water. Austic explained that they could form water districts. Forming a separate water district linked to. the town's water mains is a legal process and could be a lengthy one. But that is how districts in other towns, Lansing for instance, • tap into the municipal water supply. In response to a resident's comment ' that better water would attract growth, Austic said he hesitates to say that cer- tain areas will grow if they have ample water. Projections are based on the pre- sent situation. Areas not included now can be picked up later by referendum - i in phases. Chris Nill, of the RHI, said that income eligibility is only one of the many factors. The grant process will possibly take years. Nill explained that those who benefit, pay. The town borrows money for the water district and the district pays the town back. Those who pay for it get water. A referendum will be held: if the majority vote yes, the water district is • formed. If approved, every household in the district pays a share of the costs, even if they do not hook up. The reason for. that is that the opportunity to hook into the municipal water system remains, and likely adds to the value of the property. Jacksonville. Encouragedby Town Water St-, d - y BY GPACE M. WOLF At the November 17 Association meet- ing, Jacksonville residents said they are . encouraged by the progress the town is making to provide municipal water. Diane Hillmann renorted on the at giving homeowners more information about keeping .their septic systems healthy. Peg Coogan thanked Suzanne Motheral . for her work with the town and especially with the Association on- 1 N Jacksonville Encouraged by Town Water Study. B Y GRACE M. WOLF At the November 17 Association meet - Ing, Jacksonvilleresidents said they are encouraged by the progress the town is making to provide municipal water. Diane Hillmanu reported on the town water information meeting of the previous evening. People from other parts of the town also have water issoas that. they would like to see addressed. -The sense of urgency to solve the prob- lem is shared by more than just Jacksonville residents.. Questions such as "Do we have to hookup if the line passes by our house?" were answered. No one has to hook up to municipal water, but if the line passes by your house, you will be billed a por- tion of the costs. You can then hook up to municipal water at a later date. Volunteers will be needed to complete the survey of incomes m the area and several people at the meeting volun- teered , President Peg Coogan outlined her goals as -president for the year. They include working with the town on the water survey and doing a septic pro- gram similar to the well awareness pro- gram of this year. The program will aim at giving homeowners more information about keeping .their septic systems healthy. Peg Coogan thanked Suzanne Motheral for her work with the town and especially with the Association on. the Well Awareness program. Community Links will not be funded past 1999, -so Suzanne is moving on to other projects. In her concluding remarks, she said that the Association has gotten a great deal done: It is important to engage with people such as the Tompkins County Planning Board and the Cooperative Extension Service. Moth" cited the continuity of leader- ship, inter municipal cooperation and new initiatives as accomplishments of the Association..She believes that the work done to date is far-reaching, con- sequential work.. Treasurer Dick Coogan said that the Association will need about a thousand dollars for"the year for such items as insurance for the park Contributions are welcome and fund-raisers will be held. Both the welcome brocbureland the web page information need to be updated. The web address is www.ulyBses.ny.us/JvMe- Finger Lakes Community Newspapers November 24, 1999 Mobil not still liable to aid Jacksonville - The Ithaca Journal: Ar... Mobil not still liable to aid Jacksonville The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Bishop, Lauren Date: Dec 14, 1999 Start Page: A.3 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 492 Document Text By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff hitp://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896736333.htm... TRUMANSBURG - Mobil is legally off the hook as far as further responsibility for underground fuel spills from a gas station that contaminated private wells in the hamlet of Jacksonville in the 1970s and 80s, Town Supervisor Douglas Austic told the Ulysses Town Board Tuesday night. Austic said Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, called him Tuesday to report the finding by the state attorney general's office. At Luster's urging, the Ulysses Town Board passed a resolution last month asking the state attorney general's office to reopen an investigation into the spills. The board's hope was that Mobil could help pay for a municipal water system in the town or at least Jacksonville, where six homes are still uninhabitable because of the spills. Mobil already took some responsibility for the spills in a 1988 settlement with the state attorney general's office, under which it was required in part to buy out seven homes and treat and monitor the contaminated site. But Austic said the attorney general's office, with the state Department of Environmental Conservation, was investigating a probable new spill at the site - now a BP gas station - and determining whether the station's owner, the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y., is liable. Austic also reported Tuesday night that results from the town's income survey show that the town probably isn't eligible for grants for a water system. Some state and federal funding is available for such systems, but normally only if the median household income is below $$@$!32,965. The town received about 40 percent of its surveys back, and the area with the lowest median income - Jacksonville - was still too high at about $$@$!38,400. The next step, Austic said, is to consider going door-to-door in Jacksonville to get the remaining surveys back to see if they would bring that number down. Also, Jacksonville residents - or any group of residents in the town -have the option of petitioning the town board for a water system. According to town law, a petition to establish a water district must be signed by at least 25 property owners or 5 percent of the property owners within the proposed water district, whichever is less. The Town Board must then hold a public hearing on the proposed district and determine, among other things, whether it is in the public interest to establish the district. If borrowing money would be necessary to fund the district, as it would likely be anywhere in Ulysses, the town must also get the approval of the state comptroller before establishing the district. Jacksonville resident Dick Coogan said he thought there would probably be enough interest in the hamlet to petition the Town Board. "I guess a lot of people will be disappointed that Mobil couldn't be made to pay, but I guess that was quite a bit of an outside chance," Coogan said. Energy Resource; Oil New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 3A I of 11121132:07 PM le— bm New. spill possible - -in Jacksonvi4e By. LAUREN Bl5HOP Journal Staff j�' cc JACKSONVILLE -= Six years ago, Clifford Huff says, the BPgas.station and N•:ce Tl' Easy convenience store at the corner of- - Jacksonville and M umansburg 'mads drove his - Village Cuomo putof business.. Now;. a ,suspegted_r_under­�:,, ground fuel spill'from the station plagued the hamlet since the 197os has,contamifaated the wells:of;twc properties he owns there. -1-bought thatproperty and I thought it was a good'.hwest- i merit," -he said. "As the years went by, it got worse,•and ift.all because of a gas station." That gas station, the state Department of Environmental Conservation. believes, is the cause of a new -spill in the hamlet. b- DEC engineexs have thought this since 1998, when testing by consultants for Mobil Oil — which used to operate the gas station '- revealed sudden high levels of the gasoline additive methyl terti butyl ether, or MTBE, =m - e groundwater. Mobil has said that 'MTBE, which is added .to gasoline to make if bum cleaner'and is a p9tential , -human carcinogen, was never in its gasoline when it owned the station. . But the current owner of the BP gas station and Nice'N' Easy convenience store, the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford,-'N.Y., has told the DEC that; 'it: needs more, ird'armatiori` about the. spill before.it takes responsibility for it. 5o thei7EChas begun its owra irnes6gation,toping,to recover the costs later -from Biue Ox. .uj. ''lice Jacksonville Community - Association wH1 meet Ithaca Journal_ Tuesday, January 18, 2000 Chffbid _Huff',�6wns this building Mink at I 8jO. Trumansbarg Road - iii A c6n ville, which was once the Mage Grocery and is now used as a dance studio. Huff says the grocery store wasput ou t of business in 1994 by the BP gas station and Nice A" Easy convenience store at Ti unansburg a? z d Wednesday night' io dkuss these new devclopments.in the bawkw-MM111 hamlet, where six houses'remain uninhabitable because 4 well contamination from past fuel 44 spills.' Me 7bmpkins Gaunty.Public. Health Department's Divisi' on of Environmental Health bas found .high -levels of MTBE in thewell serving-Huff.s ernes: his fonnergocerystor& at P 1850 Tlrumamburg Road that's:. now used as a dance sta6,912 the weekends, and a houses at IM Trumadsburg Road now 41 See JACKSONVILLE, 3A 1VU-UVI IA VU MAI /joLtMa] SW Jacksonvi&- 'roads. The, _,state Depan,"wnt of EnvL,onnienjai Conservation believes the same gas sta- tion is the cause of an underground yp al that has col z tam - hiated the . waier, serving the dance studio and the apartment building next door .which Huffalsoolvns. APL-24PItIS _'MMor.heavay cOncentralad areas Z slies with new Vacant houses M MTBE coraminirdon map of the $Dig area, MwDm & Bash Engveem RONSON SLAGLVhmqa: Staff Find out more The Jacksonville. CommunftyAssociation will meet at 7:15 p.ni. Wednesday in the Hearth Room Of the Jacksonville Community Church. For more information about' BE, visit the Environmental - protection Agency's Web site at wvvw.epa.gov/swerusti/ mthe/ 1-1 W r. Jack sonville (Condinued from Page.11A) being used as apartments. Three of the four units are occupied. . In one test, the well had an MTBE contamination level of 100 parts per bil- lion..Jn a second test, the contamination level was 120 parts per billion, 12 times higher than the state's maximum- level of MTBE allowed in surface water and groundwater. Tests of wells on other properties have shown MTBE levels below 10 parts per billion. The health department is continu- ing to test other wells in Jacksonville, and the DEC has installed monitoring wells behind Huffis properties to try to find out more about the spill. Mean- while, the DEC has installed a filter on the well and is providing both properties with bottled water. "We don't know what's going on or where exactly (the spill) came from," said Tompkins County public health engineer Steve Maybee. "We only have theories on what happened here ' .Aside from the high levels of MTBE, also lending credence to the new spill theory is the fact that Huffs .two properties are southeast of the gas station, while the largest underground spill from the station, in 1979, moved north. Huffs properties were never affected before, said Richard Brazell, a DEC regional spill engineer who is heading the Jacksonville investigatiod. "This is clearly a new release," Brazell said.` Since December 1998, the DEC has been asking Blue Ox for an agreement to clean up the spill, while Blue Ox has asked for more information about it first: The=company tested the under- groun� storage tanks,in the -station and _fc3tun .►ut Btl said tanks eau pass : test -and still leak While it waits for a definitive respora Low0has conducted has shown tha4 from Blue Ox, the DEC plans to clean the median income of Ulysses resi-,. up the spill and later try to recover the dents is too high to qualify the town.. costs from the Company. Blue Ox President Neil Bartle said for state or federal grants to.lielp'ftind" a water system. Jacksonville residents he doesn't believe the company is -- or any'group of residents in'tW'. responsible for the spill at the station. town ' have the option; however, of Because Mobil's consultants first petitioning the Town Board for` ar detected MTBE at the site. in 1988, water system. Bartle said the spill .could have Jacksonville residents are also til!h occurred under another .owner, after- ing to improve the situation in their Mobil sold the station in 1982 but hamlet with their meeting tor�t: ' ."t "We're before Blue -Ox began leasing.it 10 hoping for a good inforrri8�t years later. But Bartle he to tion exchanke with a positive bu � Jacksonville Commurii said wants work come," said- with the DEC in investigating the spill Association Piesident Peg Coogan:" 11 because some fide -floating fuel has been found underground at the sta- tion, too. "If were part of the problem, we want to be part of the solution," he said. Meanwhile, the Town of Ulysses has been investigating the ooVs of cre- ating a municipal water system that would provide water to Jacksonville and other areas of the town, which is.. the only way the vacant homes in .Tacksonville could be reinhabited. But such a system costs millions of' dollars, and an.income survey"the 2 Ithaca.brownfields identified, remediate- d By MISSY GLOBERMAN Jownal Staff ` Exactly how many brownfields there are in 'Ibmpkins County ' anyone's guess. • Though the New York Department of Environmental Conservation regularly updates hazardous material spill database and an inactive hazardous waste disposal site registry, there is no existing comprehensive list o brownfields, said Walter .Hang, president of Tbxics Mageting, An Ithaca firm that generates com- puterized environmental reports. Tompkins County has many contaminated sites that might be candidates for economic redevel- opment in older industrial.areas, but most have not been investi- gated by the DEC for remedia- tion, Hang said. - According to the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency, the Carty of Ithaca has two officially declared brownfields, both on Inlet Island Hang- said Marina Realty of Ithaca and the city -owned Agway Parcel are both fully investigated and remediated by the DEC, and hence they are termed official >s brownfields. On the roughly 160 acres of mostly undeveloped buildable- land. uildable - land. m and around the ;area.: a known as the , Sputhwesf -.Park; Widewaters � bev�elpp n. Group is already. � cgfiductihj:: brownfield re tions vyc�rk, f said ::. CQrrse fion..;;tldiisony' Council member Judith Jones; The city -is." in theprooess negotia �.'> F�the: p tu+cliase of - Ithaca d intends to testil`s�: isppaee'b��a rokftdld'before itis.:dmtl=' o. IVA61 low ItitacGtl,ry, the..fonner`: Because Upstate New loif.• real estate buyers have a greater : availability of properties .to choose from for development,, there isless pressure.to do brawn - field investigation and remedia-: ;tion when compared.. tq; development in areas like densely; packed New York City, Hang - said. j#eKsonviue (Continued from Page 1A) know whether other wells had shown MTBE and whether more were going to be tested. The state's maximum allowable level for MTBE in groundwater is 10 parts per billion, and so far"only the well at Hull's properties, at more than 100 Wiper billion, has tested higher than But if any other residents are con- cemed about their well -water, the health department can test it, Maybee said. He also said the health depart- ment couldn't afford to test all the wells in the area. "We can afford not to," argued - Donald Hickman of Jacksonville Road: Other issues raised at the meeting included -getting a municipal water supply to the hamlet, which is the only way that the sfxvacant.homes could be reinhabited. "Pollution is relevant, but the peon- ty ought to be a propec-water supply," said Don Sola of Swamp College Road. • The Town of Ubwes has explored creating,a town-wik-municipal water system thatwouifterve Jacksonville, but has so far f nitffLtliie.00st� too high. and that the median household income in the town is likely too high to qualify for funding. But* Any group of residents could petition the town for a water system. Ithaca Journal January 19, 2000 himself down. I can't imagine the today. - jaekson •vine msideiats �n about Welspiu., By LAUREN BISHOP JownalSrafj` - JACIWNVRLE. - More than 40 residents packed Wednesday night's Jacksonville CommunityAssoaatioa meeting, expressing frustration and anger that wells are still being contami- nated by underground fuel spills more than ?A years after a large spill from the station that left six homes there uninhabitable. The state Department of Environmental Conservation believes that there is a new spill from the BP gas station at the cor- ner of Jacksonvilleand liumansburgroads. A well serving two properties not affected by previobs spills from the station has recently shown high levels of gasoline addifive and potential human carcinogen methyl tertiary butyl ether,.or MTBE Most of the residents' anger was directed at the DEC, which they said never told them -about thenewcontamination. - But the owner of the reben4y contaminated properties at 1848 and 185Q 'IIumansburg Road, Clifford Huff, has been in regular contact with regional DEC offi- cials. .. The DEC has installed a filter on thewell serving his two proper - `The ITEC is like this shadow • agenc�.We never hear about What they're doing.' Diane *illmann,' ofAlanse Road ties - an apartment building. 'housing -three people and a dance studio — and is providing them with bottled water. `°Ilse DEC is like this shadow agency," said Diane Hillmann of Manse Read, who said that she only found out about Huff's cont- aminated well from a newspaper article. "We never hear about - what they're doing." • While no one from the DEC was.at the meeting to respond to residents' concerns, association members agreed to invite a repre- sentative 'to the group's meeting next month.' Residents did have plenty of questions for .lbmpkins County public health engineer Steve • Maybee,who hasbeen testingwells -in Jade amine. Many wanted to SeeJA MNVILLE, 5A• EDITORIAL The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Stewart, Gary Date: Jan 21, 2000 Start Page: A.9 Section: EDITORIALS Text Word Count: 360 Document Text The trouble in Jacksonville It starts with a sluggish DEC that has failed a worried community In recent years, the state Department of Environmental Conservation has been alternately described as toothless, uncaring and a political tool. The DEC's investigation of contaminated wells and underground fuel spills in Jacksonville adds inept to that list. The DEC's leadership role in Cornell University's Lake Source Cooling Project and other local environmental controversies can be endlessly debated and analyzed. But there is no gray area regarding Jacksonville, whose residents have been tormented by questions and concerns about well pollution since a major fuel spill 20 -plus years ago. This should be a chance for the DEC to inform and take charge. Instead, too many Jacksonville residents have been left in the dark about their hamlet's environment. The DEC's sluggish approach and ineffectual outreach were blasted at a Jacksonville Community Association meeting this week. When that group meets next month - 7:15 p.m., Feb. 16, Jacksonville Community Church - the DEC should be there to listen. The massive DEC might be an easy target, but there are millions of New Yorkers who trust the agency to do the right thing. In recent years, concerns about environmental law enforcement in New York has been questioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and some major watchdog groups. Allegations about the DEC's special treatment of some environmental lawbreakers has also prompted a major investigation by the Assembly Committee on Environmental Conservation focusing on enforcement, permitting, regulatory policy, mission and structure. One might think the DEC has been around since Teddy Roosevelt was governor, but the agency is only 30 years old. Its regulatory mission runs the gamut from fish to forestry, from mining to hazardous wastes. Its stated responsibilities include, "encourage (public) participation in environmental affairs." For many Jacksonville residents, concerns about water supplies and contamination don't constitute an affair, but an outrage. While some have moved - either by mandate or choice - others have remained, hoping for some sense of urgency and consistency from the DEC. What they've experienced is a cumbersome bureaucracy whose job performance has been dearly unacceptable. New York Northeast EDITORIALS; Pg. 9A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I of 2 1112113 3:32 PM EDITORIAL - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doe/896738168.htm... In recent years, concerns about environmental law enforcement in New York has been questioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and some major watchdog groups. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission_ 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:32 PM W DEC -comes- to - � •a.Cks . onviile on fuelspin. ly LAUREN BISHOPhelp resolve the problems" is sonville, but only one well, serving ou nal Star absolutely essential to the process_" an a artinent buildin and a clan ' JACKSONVILLE — What can lew York state do to protect Jack- onville residents from future conta- 3ination from underground fuel pills? What can residents them - %Ives do? What other communities ave been affected byspills, and how ave they resolved the problem? Those are some -of the questions acksonville residents hope to'get nswers to Thursday night, when tey meet with state Department of :nvironmental Conservation engi- eers to discuss a likely new spill TOW gas station that has been the of several groundwater-cont- rninating fuel spills in the hamlet in ie Town of Ulysses over the last vo decades. Jacksonville. Community Associa- on President Peg Coogan said she opes the meeting will create a bet- Ir et.r relationship among Jacksonville sidents, the DEC and the' Tomp- ins County Public Health .Depart •• lent, which will also have represen- ;tives there. "I suspect we will be dealingwith its or similar situations for some rhe, and a strong rapport with the ;encies and officials appointed to Coogan said. For Jacksonville resident Diane Hillman, the meeting is also impor- tant because she and other residents haven't gotten'their information directly from the DEC, but from secondhand sources, like the news - r. p "We want to make sure we devel- op some communication -back and forth that we can depend upon," she said The Jacksonville Community Association met last week to come up with questions to send to bEC regional spill engineer Richard Brazell, who has been heading the agency's investigation into what they say is,a spill from the BP gas station at the corner of Jacksonville and Tiumansburg roads. Brazell will be at Thursday's meeting, along with an assistant to state Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, and John Anders-* soh, director of the Tompkins Coun- ty Public Health Department's bivi- sion of Environmental Health, and public health engineer Steve May- Maybee has tested 21 private wells for new contamination in J4- studio at 1848 and 1850 Trumans- burg Road, has shown levels of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, that are high- er than the maximum level federal standards allow -in groundwater. The DEC, which has taken over the investigation into the spill, has installed a filter on the well serving those properties and is -supplying them with bottled water. But it's also supplying water to Burke Physical Therapy and a home at 1845 Tiumansburg Road that have shown MTBE levels below the federal maximum of 10 parts per bil- lion. The DEC is trying to get in touch with the owner of four proper- ties near the intersection of Jack- sonville and Trumansburg roads that have also shown -low MTBE levels, Maybee said. The -DEC believes there is a new spill from the station because of the presence of MTBE in those wells, whichwas fust found by Mobil Oil's well 'testing. Mobil was responsible for the largest *spill from the station in 1979, but says MTBE was never contained in itsgasoline when it owned the station. The. DEC has taken over investigating the new spill Ithaca Journal Wednesday, February 3, 2000 -Deta111iS The Jacksonville Community Association meeting with rep- resentatives from the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the Tomp- kins County Public Health Department will be held at. 7:15 p.m. Thursday in the fel- lowship hall of the•Jack- ' sonville Community Church. while it tries to get the station's cur- rent owner, the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y., to assume responsibil- ity for it. Coogan also hopes that Thurs- day's meeting will help residents learn more about MTBE, which is added to gasoline to make it burn cleaner but which is also a potential human carciaogen•that has polluted groundwater in places an across the country. "(MTBE) is a nationwide .prob- lem, not an isolated case just injack. and the more we all learn about its causes And how to prevent subsequent contamination, the bet,. ter off well be," she said. DEC comes to Jacksonville on fuel spill The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Bishop, Lauren Date: Feb 23, 2000 Start Page: A.3 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 656 Document Text By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - What can New York state do to protect Jacksonville residents from future contamination from underground fuel spills? What can residents themselves do? What other communities have been affected by spills, and how have they resolved the problem? Those are some of the questions Jacksonville residents hope to get answers to Thursday night, when they meet with state Department of Environmental Conservation engineers to discuss a likely new spill from a gas station that has been the source of several groundwater -contaminating fuel spills in the hamlet in the Town of Ulysses over the last two decades. Jacksonville Community Association President Peg Coogan said she hopes the meeting will create a better relationship among Jacksonville residents, the DEC and the Tompkins County Public Health Department, which will also have representatives there. "I suspect we will be dealing with this or similar situations for some time, and a strong rapport with the agencies and officials appointed to help resolve the problems is absolutely essential to the process," Coogan said. For Jacksonville resident Diane Hillmann, the meeting is also important because she and other residents haven't gotten their information directly from the DEC, but from secondhand sources, like the newspaper. "We want to make sure we develop some communication back and forth that we can depend upon," she said. The Jacksonville Community Association met last week to come up with questions to send to DEC regional spill engineer Richard Brazell, who has been heading the agency's investigation into what they say is a spill from the BP gas station at the comer of Jacksonville and Trumansburg roads. Brazell will be at Thursday's meeting, along with an assistant to state Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, and John Andersson, director of the Tompkins County Public Health Department's Division of Environmental Health, and public health engineer Steve Maybee. Maybee has tested 21 private wells for new contamination in Jacksonville, but only one well, serving an apartment building and a dance studio at 1848 and 1850 Trumansburg Road, has shown levels of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, that are higher than the maximum level federal standards allow in groundwater. The DEC, which has taken over the investigation into the spill, has installed a filter on the well serving those properties and is supplying them with bottled water. But it's also supplying water to Burke Physical Therapy and a home at 1845 Trumansburg Road that have shown MTBE levels below the federal maximum of 10 parts per billion. The DEC is trying to get in touch with the owner of four properties near the intersection of Jacksonville and Trumansburg roads that have also shown low MTBE levels, Maybee said. The DEC believes there is a new spill from the station because of the presence of MTBE in those wells, which was first found by Mobil Oil's well testing. Mobil was responsible for the largest spill from the station in 1979, but says MTBE was never contained in its gasoline when it owned the station. The DEC has taken over investigating the new spill while it I of 2 11/2/13 1:58 PM DEC comes to Jacksonville on fuel spill - The Ithaca Journal: A... http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896726312.htm... tries to get the station's current owner, the Blue Ox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y., to assume responsibility for it. Coogan also hopes that Thursday's meeting will help residents team more about MTBE, which is added to gasoline to make it bum cleaner but which is also a potential human carcinogen that has polluted groundwater in places all across the country. "(MTBE) is a nationwide problem, not an isolated case just in Jacksonville, and the more we all learn about its causes and how to prevent subsequent contamination, the better off we'll be," she said. Details The Jacksonville Community Association meeting with representatives from the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the Tompkins County Public Health Department will be held at 7:15 p.m. Thursday in the fellowship hall of the Jacksonville Community Church. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 3A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Maybee has tested 21 private wells for new contamination in Jacksonville, but only one well, serving an apartment building and a dance studio at 1848 and 1850 Trumansburg Road, has shown levels of the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, that are higher than the maximum level federal standards allow in groundwater. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2113 1:58 PM � Supervisor hppe l _0- --k er Ulysses could take an debt for haru]et system; Austic tell smeeting; By -LAUREN BISHOP Jownai Swf}' JACKSONVILLE Macy residents left Thursday night's Jacksonvine CAmnrimity Assodatkin stetting with a fresh dose ci fie,fxelrog'1: a. hamlet that has wrestled with the problem ofweIlwater contaminat «ibydtutfram a Ips nsorz than Yeam ' About 3o residents gathered in the JacksonvnIe Community Church to meet with representa. lives from the T mm of •TJiysses, fire .Tompk�ris County Department of Health and )Tear Yorkstate to have their questions answered about evideax Ot; a new spell from the $P gss station at the comer od Jadm&o 6 and The meeting was the fast time. so many residents met with a rep. resenttiNe from the state Department of Euvirnnmeatal Cypnsecvafion, the agency h�g rhe and of -0e stew spit., Represent w. frtomn the state Atto6ty Cienergs officx that of Assemblyman Mastia luster, D -125th Distad,. and the lbmpkias County Health Department also attended flit meeting. But it toes L ly sses Town &peikw DOW* Austin's state. ment that the t mm would be v,% nnnnapal water qstem in Jacksnrgle, regiaual �E ez�ea' Richard Brazell told residesrfs at the meemg, which was faolitated Cyomcll �envuO r Sharon Andeison- and former C:omen S1rMod1*vl. But at tiro some time, the io t86 lar the,� and pay beck the DEC for what it wM spend -on my ong and treating rt, Bia�eII said. Me -Ox President Ned Bartle has said hes not yet mooed the RA is the ing to Laid: an d6bt to • munktwemffin Monts that •that easel( many redaeni winds. :{`Fur the first timet, I fed there's hope," Sart Aiitbara Bo�sntn_, who has liedYe . is JadrsonviIle t5or lb Kana K who awns the Couritty Square m Vie; m Uly+ases Those cwincnts; though, were mipced wit ones from resi- dents wiio said that there octet larger problems in Jaci sonviRe that needed to be addressed, par tiarlarly Propetly values, ."The original sprll'has caeated continuing problems that cuftbe comnpaiVs fault Brazell said the DEC .has; pent-' about' . $6t1,QM int Jackwnvr74e, cats that include bottled water t prop• wells ' hastetested positive for the -gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl' ether, • or. MP.E. The appearance Wfbe . addit3Ye, a possible 'g�CuiogcR tit �I '*'_,0-b 11 says was 'i "ver msmris {gasoline when it owned the .*14 fast led to i�elievic there was a new spr71 in,i9�8. ` , � The Jac:ksonvdle C Association will have a hollow -u fs' . meeting at 7:15 • pm. next Thursday in the Jaclssomolle .+ Community Qrturb: j Ithaca Journal Friday, Fekp#ry 25, 2000 quantified bypro ''Mneed�'t6 out of ,xhe groundane FIilhinam. °'Ahete6be some addressing ofak - Sr hazrrea there have' been vacant since LW When.ft state Mob1 Oil —. used to OVM the stair and was rrspon- scbie kri largest R4 in 1979 ;- %buythem.Although 'studies oemuiis�o�ed.tlyr wit showed ibat a Umn- system would be too costly, anY group of residents oould PeWOn fora smaller system, As Part of its moa into the new $PA the DEC is also =a nm ng the costs of a The Ithaca Jbumail Saturday, March 4, 20001 DOUG Aivsnc GuEsr coo. mmsr Public= water for UIYS ses -on tap? Many of you probably read the - article covering.the dack4nnvilN Association meeting on Thurs= day, Feb. 24. The fact that the' - Ulysses Town Board is more .than willing, at this time to fur- ther study and dcvelop.�%ater dig- . tricts in some portrons Of the ton is not a new id= In fact; I' have -reported the same thing' several times in the p,•tslt Last spring, the town cont tracted with a consulting engin neering firm to investiggate the possi bility. of several'differerd, approaches to Nmisii -municipal watcr)to Ulysses'and detesnnttc the probable cost of -such dist, triets, The areas to lie studied.; were derived front resident amt+" meats over the years as to t1w water situationin =heir areas. From the initial engineer'i• report, we now have aggood feel' for the pote*31 cost ofcreatirtg- a municipal water system. Unden the laws of New York govemin&•- special districts, residents living, within the district, and only those residents of tite town will ht!' responsible for casts associatedt with this disttict. i These costs i typically include the-engtneenng, infrastructure t development, - : !' debt repayment and other costs associated with suQplying water ` to •the district. The municipals -ty acts as a district administrator, anftng funding, wallet ing rev- crones and paying the bills of thti disirict, On the other hand.'you, the residents of a praposed dis� Lnct, have -final approval of the district formation through ads: . trict referendum; The initial step in the process is a petitioned request of the: Town Board to investigate the. formation of a district for a speci- fied area. My advice to residents, who wish to f=ort •a district, is tu. get your neighbors together, dis cuss tIt 'need and extent oflhri_ area to be sen -ed. - 1 Once this is determined, initi p ate: a petition and pl,signatumm, requesting that the Town. Board: consider the formation of 3 spei tial water district in your area: With petition in hand, the Ttnvii . Board will investigate the needi &�&lop pIansand determine dist: trice cxpertses and user casts i • ]nformational meetings iviTV i be scheduled to make this cast• } informadon available to'diatict residents, and a referendum--wiTl' ) he scheduled at which time resin I dents in The proposed district w& f decide whether or not the district• i is to be formed. your vote will~ decide the outcnnteto the d& id formation request. PrellArrary engineering stud- ies indicate that the annual usef,• cost of studied sample district is relatively high, although probabfic not prahibilive. We need specti petillons from residents to clattiX• district boundaries and toen more.accurate cost &termina-. tions for specific regions of thL- town. This information will be more-. meaningful and useful to those requesting specific areas. The. Town Board has proceeded as far as reasonable at this point - and will not go further.without, specific petitioned requests. If you are in need of further infor-- matian,. please feel frte. to tali: upon me and IT he vls,rl to helm _ :� r' i= i^ tt F R.:•: �1.i•ti r . y.. - � s .\. 'f. �'�.'�'�"-•. �.... .•�' fin!._ . •tiY K rj+ n •4 --a 3l . - T y !i e.�•,1y:.:. �..ir. 7 a. :}lid •. M; .' .... ��1., •,off" < S'a'-.:;,'• : .:,a�•F{ ,?�. ,f. ..�-'', �s ti, ii��.:.wti'_ .d'FVI_Nr" '� �.� -- �rvlt %:�y F_v,•��j'' '•:r a �,;, �. • :fir•• � �r _ __:fi:'• r„y ,��Y�� f,,x, q.�;�— . ,`^,Y4i��:Y••'S r . �� w - - ��.- .. r. - 4�;". •tom r•r."-'.�` ,.tai'.:,~.'} �'• �:rt:1p• xs:`.:�.r. .'s� h yri r1f 4 r7 _ �Ci•. ."��« � rn r •J'1r1' _ ••.F. rhe' .. - D years after gas leaks : Jacksonville 'as spills � Mast 1,eavily concentrated areas, Vacant 11DUSC5 contaminated we f I wate r,_ 0 Recovery well y ' r Recovery trench Jacksonville residents stiff - struggling far s:o l uti o n Ely LAUREN BISHOP- ': , ; 'Iktteryearsaf unsettled law `'?,;• i Iourrialstaff = Ysuits, canton filters and battled - JACKSONVILLE-1W nty, water, Mobil bought out tiie homes in-1988, and the residents _-; years ago this month, state offs-....; iv#iose wells had become contain-'-.^4` �� r clots to d Mat there had been a :'' gasoline spit! at-the Ma>l . cervico ; inaLed moved'away.�ao1r station an the canier.of 4 13ut even with a groundwater} �iU - , 5on�lle Tumansburg (Rudte.96) and `: lualltreatyinstallent stem that was cyen- ' City o �a �r 'lually installcd,six ofule hormes Jacksnnyille roads Ithaca Map of the spilt area from 1989, offer treatrrient system was installed ��reniain,iacant because.wiiile ilio _ 711e spill; caused by a faulty Ievelsof contaminationhave IWA Source: Blaslarid & Hoak Engineers • RONSON SLAGLEJJmm l Stall connection at an underground beendecreasing, the spill still tank, was fust detected when • . -' [lues , r}ot meet state cleanup stan- , sprue residents aG[oss ilio street'. • ' dlirds And recent monitoring = .midents wells to make sure they , saw.' iter name . in . a newspaper from, the station noticed. that. ..''`F data from that system indicates. wereri tcnritaminated, including article sliacked her. their warter smelled like gasoline. '.�ereiliay be anew spill. otic belogging to JacksoAiville res- ' f=ortunately, her ,50-foal deep An estimated 4,000 gallons had " iderit NO well, which is opposite [lie plume, seeped into die groundwater cifMAW response . It turned OUL that 1-1111man's showed no evidence of gasoline the Town of Ulysses liamlet, and wasn't, but the tact that she was contamination. -would eventually contaminate After the settlement, Mobil included in the agreement — the wells of at least eight lionies. - was required to test five other which she learned about aftershe See WATER, 5A o0 O rt or, CL m N r Water woes linger forJacksonyffie residents On the outside, nothing much has. changed: • Six vacant houses still haunt the hamlet of Jacksonville, just as they, have ,for the past I I years, constant reminders of,a 21 -year-old under- groiarid•gasoline spill that polluted the local water supply. But on Ilie inside, a small, dedicated group of residents is actively trying to turn around decades of damage in die Nee of often overwliehtting obstacles. Every -month, members of If ie Jack- sonville Community Association gath- er in a mall roam of the Jacksonville Conimu'pity. Church to talk about upcoming activities, how much motley they ling -in their treasury (not much) and,'af-course, dieirwater situalion. -Ip short, it's not good, even before Ilie first gasoline spill in [lie early 1970s. People here have always had problenis with the quantity and yuali�ty of theirwell-water, so most drink bot- tled water, And the only way those six vacant homes could be reinhabited would be With the creation of a muiric- itaal water system, which, be:atise of it3'high.costs, has never materialized despite several efforts over the years. The situation got worse when rust - dents recently found out that the slate Department of Egvironmental Conser- vation believes there's a nmv spill from the gas station at die come r:of Jack- sonville and Tnrmansbuig roads that pias leaked gasoline additive KI73E, a potential carcinogen, into nrore.wells- Theli, last: month, residents in Jack- sonville and the rest of the 'rowil of' Ulysses Stented -receiving notices of their new prelirnitiaiy property assessments froi,i die Tompkins County Division of Assessment, which is undertaking a ABOU•r. TowN countywide prop�.erty reevaluation. Most people's assessments stayed about the sante. The average increase in [lie entire Town of Ulysses was less diad 1 percent, said Stephen Whicher, director of the Division of Assessment. . But many Jacksonville residents didn't thunk this seemed right, given the continuing prob,lems from gas spills, the negative view of the community from media coverage and, simply; the sight of var:mutt, boarded -up houses. Resident Dick Coogan said lie knows of one Jacksonville resident*ho recenlly sold his house but heard that the person, who bought it thought he was getting a great deal — which means, of course, that the seIIer wasn't. "If we had to. sell," Coogan said, "we would take a beating." • - Other Jacksonville residents, like Kate O'Gorman, have had their hous- es ori the market before with no luck. Now, O'Gorman is one of the handful of people receiving free bottled water from, the DEC because their wells have shown MTBE corrtarnination, even though she had always drunk bottled water anyway. - . . "A house is one of the biggest commitments of a lifetime," said O'Gorman, who has lived in Jack- sonville for ahnost 19 ycars. "This has been a disaster for me. Sp what would happen, residents wondered, if they appealed fora reduction in their individual assess- ments? It stands to reason, they rea-. soned, that if residents' property val- ues Have declined because of the s{�ills and vacant houses, the assessed values should go down along with thea,. That wary, they believe, they can demonstrate that the conditions in 7acksonvilie are .negatively affecting the tax base for the entire Town of Ulysses. If Jacksonville assessments went down significantly, the town and the Truruairsburg Central School Dis- trict would have to increase tax rates for everyone. Whicher said the Division of Assessment hadn't been aware of, the newest spill and needed more ir,fQrma- 'dol, about it before its impart could be determined. The division would be reviewing assessments early next week, lie said, and additional information will be available alter the tentative tax roll is filed with Elie state on May I. But, perliaps more importantly, the half-dozen Jacksonville residents who. are appealing for lower assessments hope that it will show all town residents that brnrging municipal water to Jack- sonville acksonville will also benefit them. Residents are' planning to canvas the streets of Jacksonville to ket names for a petition asking the Town of Ulysses to study the possibility of estab- Iishing. a water disifict for Jacksonville._ They're also planning to follow up on a letierserrt by A=niblyniari Martin Luster, D -127th District,- to Attorney General Eliot -Spitzer iii March saying tie thinkt Mobil and Blue Oar, the fast. and present owners of the gas station, should help fund a public watersystem- And Eliere's been another develop- ment ill Jacksonville, a somewhat sur- prising one given the�harmlefs history. A small insuraneb agency just moved into one of the MTBE-conta ninated properties on Trumansburg Road, which had housed a dance studio. Owner Jeff Williams' recently, opened it up after he lost his.lease in Trurhabsburg and was unable to Find another space there. lie knew all about the problems in Jackminviille, but wasn't really fawd by them. He had ]nolc'utg for a place along a maul road, he said, and the DEC is providing him with bottled water while they utvestigate the.spilL A welcome -to -Jacksonville letter to Williams was -0i, the agenda at Wednesday niglifs Jacksonville Com- munity Association nieeting. Wit€jail the other things to be done, no one had gotten around to it yet. But they were able to say hello to Williams at the meeting, which lie attended, ' Welcome to Jacksonville, they said sardonically. run .City, U.S.A., they joked. And remember: Don't drink the water! I.a miBisltnp oulm Imm nems in 7r nw- hfns Comm}: She [illi & �wdiatar 249ZM Jacksonville may receive water -district grant The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Bishop, Lauren Date: Nov 2, 2000 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 354 Document Text By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - State Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, and Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic will hold a news conference at 10:30 a.m. Friday to announce a major development in Jacksonville's quest for clean water. "I believe that our announcement will be of great importance to Jacksonville residents and may indicate that an end is near to the long search for dean water in that community," Luster said Wednesday. Jacksonville resident Dick Coogan, whose wife, Peg, is president of the Jacksonville Community Association, said Wednesday that residents are expecting to hear news of a $$@$!500,000 state grant toward a water district along Route 96 that would likely include parts of Jacksonville, Iradell and Krums Comers roads. Private wells in Jacksonville, an unincorporated, residential hamlet in the Town of Ulysses, have been contaminated by several underground fuel spills from a gas station at the comer of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road dating back to the 1970s. Jacksonville residents have been collecting signatures on a petition asking the town to study the possibility of establishing a water district in the hamlet. Coogan also said that the town had a good chance at receiving a zero -interest loan for the water district. The next step in its creation would be public information meetings and a public referendum, which he said would probably not happen until around next March. Only property owners could vote in the referendum, and those who don't vote would count as "no" votes, he said. If the referendum doesn't pass, he doubts that the town would try again to form a district for at least another 10-20 years. Referendums for water districts have been voted down in Jacksonville in the past. The conference will be held on the east side of the intersection of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road. "Our feeling is, we've been graced with one more chance to make it happen, so let's not blow it," he said. Luster and Austic will be joined at Friday's news conference by members of the Ulysses Town Board and representatives from the Jacksonville Community Association. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) 1 of 2 1112113 1:46 PM Jacksonville may receive water -district grant - The Ithaca Journa... http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896716999.htm... Jacksonville resident Dick Coogan, whose wife, Peg, is president of the Jacksonville Community Association, said Wednesday that residents are expecting to hear news of a $$@$1500,000 state grant toward a water district along Route 96 that would likely include parts of Jacksonville, Iradell and Krums Comers roads. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:46 PM State grant The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Nov 4, 2000 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 667 Document Text new source for Ulysses Area primed for water district By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - The hamlet of Jacksonville has perhaps its best chance yet to solve its water woes. State Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, stood on the steps of the Old Colonial Church on Jacksonville Road Friday to announce a state grant of $$@$1500,000 to defray the cost of a municipal water system for the hamlet and nearby parts of the Town of Ulysses. The grant - through the state's Strategic Investment Program - would not only help pay for the estimated $$@$!3.8 million cost of building the district, Luster said. It would also improve the town's overall rating in being considered for an interest-free state loan to finance the rest of the project through the state's Clean Water Revolving Loan Fund. But, the grant still needs approval from the state Senate and Gov. George Pataki. "I have no reason to believe that there will be any objections," Luster said. Jacksonville has been plagued since 1979 with a series of underground gasoline leaks.- some of which were traced to a local service station - which have contaminated the groundwater. As a result, seven homes in the hamlet were vacated in the mid-1980s when Mobil Oil, former owner of the gas station, purchased the buildings under a settlement with the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the homeowners. Mobil has permits to demolish five of the vacant homes it now owns. A Mobil spokesman said he didn't know when the company planned to raze the buildings. "Jacksonville has suffered from this environmental blight and health threat for more than 20 years," said Luster, a former Ulysses town supervisor. "I am pleased that the Assembly has provided enough funding to offset the cost of the project so that it is more affordable to residents of the area." The proposed water disctrict would serve The hamlet of Jacksonville Route 96 from the Jacksonville hamlet to Iradell Road Duboise Road from Iradell Road to Wilkins Road Hinging Post Road Wilkins Road between Duboise Road and Route 96 A spur along Krums Comers Road to Perry City Road 1 of 2 1112/13 2:39 PM State grant -'Che Ithaca Journal: Archives A spur along Van Doms Comers Road to Iradell Road Perry City Road from Route 96 to Jacksonville Road Jacksonville Road from Perry City Road to the hamlet of Jacksonville http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896715848.htm... A spur north of the hamlet along Jacksonville Road to Cold Springs Road A spur northwest of the hamlet along Route 96 to Cold Springs Road A spur along Swamp College Road to Halseyville Road A spur along Colegrove Road, 1,000 feet A spur along Cold Springs Road to Durling Road. The system would take its water from the Bolton Point water plant in the Town of Ithaca. To serve the proposed Jacksonville district, a water tower and tank would be constructed in the Town of Ithaca, on West Hill near the Ulysses and Enfield town lines. Ithaca Town Supervisor Cathy Valentino said representatives from the town have met twice with engineers from Ulysses, and the proposal hasn't moved forward very far yet. "At this point, all we've agreed to is that yes, this is feasible, and yes, we support a plan that would deliver water to Jacksonville," Valentino said. An additional water tank on West Hill would also benefit Town of Ithaca residents, Valentino said. The northwest comer of the town has frequent problems with inadequate water pressure, and there is no backup water tower or holding tank. An additional water tank would also allow the Town of Ithaca to service its own water tower without disrupting water supply to West Hill homes and businesses, including Cayuga Medical Center. Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said the first of several public information meetings on the proposed district will take place before the end ofthe year. A referendum on forming the water district will take place before March 2001 so the town can meet the state's deadline to be considered for an interest-free loan. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1 A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Slate Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, stood on the steps of the Old Colonial Church on Jacksonville Road Friday to announce a state grant of $$@$1500,000 to defray the cost of a municipal water system for the hamlet and nearby parts of the Town of Ulysses. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:39 PM Exxon Mobil razes The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Dec 5, 2000 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 423 Document Text first of five homes Future of Jacksonville sites uncertain By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Exxon Mobil Corp. has begun demolishing the Jacksonville homes it purchased in the Ulysses hamlet following a series of fuel spills that fouled underground wells. On Monday, workers razed a home located at 5042 Jacksonville Road. The white, single-family house was reduced to rubble by an excavator in about 212 hours. Exxon Mobil has demolition permits for a total of five houses on Route 96 and Jacksonville Road. The demolition work is being completed by the Syracuse firm Paragon Environmental Construction. A Paragon spokesman said all five of the homes will be leveled by Christmas. "(Demolition) is not a first -choice solution;" said Paul Stodghill, spokesman for the Jacksonville Community Association. "We had hoped Exxon Mobil would have rehabilitated the homes, but apparently they did not see fit to do so" Exxon Mobil donated the salvage rights to the homes to Historic Ithaca. Historic Ithaca representatives were in the home for several hours Monday before the two-man wrecking crew moved in to demolish it. They removed fixtures that had some historic significance. George Lyons, Historic Ithaca's director of preservations, said his group removed two cargo vans full of interior fixtures including sinks, a toilet, a railing, baseboard molding and windows that they will use to refurbish historic homes. It's not immediately Gear what Exxon Mobil will do with what will soon be five vacant lots in Jacksonville. Corporate representatives could not be reached for comment Monday. However, one of the corporation's options is to wait until municipal water is introduced in Jacksonville, and then sell the lots to builders. Jacksonville has sought to install a municipal water district since underground fuel leaks began plaguing the community in the late 1970s. In November, Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, announced a $$@$!500,000 state grant to begin the process of bringing municipal water to Jacksonville. The Town of Ulysses may be eligible for a no -interest loan to fund the $$@$!3.8 million project, if the state receives an application by March 2001. The first public information meeting on a proposed water district will be held at 7 p.m. Dec. 18 at the Jacksonville Community Center. BILL WARREN/Journal Staff I of 2 11/2/13 2:25 PM Exxon Mobil razes - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http:Hpgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doct896717018htm... Workers with Paragon Environmental Construction of Syracuse tear down a house Monday at 5042 Jacksonville Road. The house is one of seven homes purchased by the then -Mobil Oil Corporation in 1988 following a series of fuel spills. Five of the homes will be demolished by Christmas. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) first of five homes Future of Jacksonville sites uncertain By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Exxon Mobil Corp. has begun demolishing the Jacksonville homes it purchased in the Ulysses hamlet following a series of fuel spills that fouled underground wells. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:25 PM Exxon Mobil demolishes homes The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Dec 12, 2000 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 460 Document Text Corporation considering options for Jacksonville land By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - As Exxon Mobil Corp. continues to tear down homes in the Ulysses Hamlet of Jacksonville, company officials said they still don't know what they will finally do with the soon-to-be vacant properties. Bary Wood, an Exxon Mobil spokesman, said Monday there were still several options available to the company but that no decision has been made. Wood confirmed two options under consideration: selling the vacant lots once municipal water service is available, or donating the land to the community. "There is no leading case," Wood said. "I don't want to speculate." Wood said there was no timetable for predicting when the corporation would decide. Exxon Mobil purchased six parcels of land in 1988 as part of a legal settlement. Leaks from an underground tank at a gas station have polluted the well water of several nearby homes since the 1970s. Five residents sold their homes to Exxon Mobil for an undisclosed sum. One resident opted not to sell his home. The seventh property is the Old Colonial Church on Jacksonville Road. Exxon Mobil has no plans to demolish that building, Wood said. Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said no one from Exxon Mobil had talked to him about donating the land in at least a year. "They mentioned it once." Austic said. "But I haven't heard anything since then." Austic said that he would be happy with any outcome that allows local people to determine how the land will be used next. He noted that the land, on Route 96 and along Jacksonville Road, is zoned for both commercial and residential use. "The town might be interested (in accepting donated land) if the buildings are gone, it's cleaned up and nicely graded," he said. In the meantime, Jacksonville residents continue to wait for a municipal water system. Austic said the first public information meeting on the proposed waster district will be held at 7 p.m. Dec. 18 in the Trumansburg Elementary School auditorium. State Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, a former Ulysses town supervisor, recently announced that Ulysses would be receiving $$@$!500,000 from the state to help finance the proposed water district, which will cost an estimated $$@$!3.8 million. 1 of 2 11/2/13 3:24 PM Exxon Mobil demolishes homes - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/896716822.htm... The water would come from the Bolton Point plant and serve as many as 350 Jacksonville residents. The grant, Luster said, would also help the town's credit rating, possibly making Ulysses eligible for an interest-free loan from the state to cover the remaining $$@$13.3 million in estimated building costs for the water district. Water hearing The first public information meeting on a proposed waster district for Ulysses will be held at 7 p.m. Dec. 18 in the Trumansburg Elementary School auditorium. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The grant, Luster said, would also help the town's credit rating, possibly making Ulysses eligible for an interest-free loan from the state to cover the remaining $$@$!3.3 million in estimated building costs for the water district. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 or 2 11/2/13 3:24 PM ABOUT TOWN The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Dec 30, 2000 Start Page: A.3 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 571 Document Text DAN HIGGINS Jacksonville residents eager for water district The Town of Ulysses is continuing its efforts to pipe water service to about 300 homes in Jacksonville. Meanwhile, a former Ulysses supervisor is attempting to convince the fuel company responsible for the well contamination in Jacksonville to help somehow. More than 300 people came to the Trumansburg Elementary School Auditorium on Dec. 18 to hear about the tentative plans for the water district, which would take water from the Balton Point plant on the east side of Cayuga Lakeand run it up Route 96 and into Jacksonville. Water wells in the hamlet have been plagued for years by a series of underground fuel spills from a nearby gas station. The plan may cost more than $$@$!3 million. But, by a show of hands, the people who would have to pay for the district expressed overwhelming support of at least moving the water district plan to its next stage, which is determining more precisely what its boundaries would be. Engineers and consultants have been working on the plan for months, said Town Supervisor Douglas Austic, and now think they can provide municipal water at an annual cost of about $$@$!540 per user. "About $$@$!300 of that pay for building costs, and the $$@$!200 -plus on top of that would be average water costs," Austic said. Once the boundaries of the district are set, a move Austic said that will be sure to include plenty of opportunities for public comment, the town will hold another informational meeting with the members of the proposed water district. That meeting will probably be in mid -spring, Austic said. Then, the people who would receive the water have to vote to form the water district, and after that, construction can begin. It's still not clear, though, how the construction costs would be paid for. In November, Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, announced that the state would give Ulysses a $$@$!500,000 grant to help pay for the district. With the grant, Luster and Austic hoped it would boost the town's eligibility for an interest-free state loan to pay for the balance of construction costs. Austic said recently that Ulysses' official rating wouldn't be high enough to apply for the funds in 2001, but it would be high enough to stand a reasonable chance of getting the interest-free loan approved in 2002. In the meantime, Luster, who was Ulysses town supervisor from 1983-88, has invited Exxon Mobil to help. In a letter dated Thursday, Luster suggested that an Exxon Mobil representative meet with him and Austic to discuss a way for the oil company to help out. I of 2 11/2/13 2:31 PM ABOUT TOWN - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pqarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896716852.htm... "It seems to me that one way that Mobil could dear its books of this 21 -year-old problem is to assist the community in its efforts to establish a permanent water district." the letter read, in part. "If Mobil participates in that (water district) effort financially that would be good for them from a public relations standpoint ... they could rid themselves of this problem in a fairway," Luster said in a telephone interview Friday. "Instead of skulking away, they could walk away from this with their heads high." Luster didn't expect Exxon Mobil had received the letter by Friday. Exxon Mobil officials were not available for comment. Dan Higgins covers town news in Tompkins County. He can be reached at 2749232 or via e-mail at dhiggins@ithat:a.gannett.com. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 3A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) More than 300 people came to the Trumansburg Elementary School Auditorium on Dec. 18 to hear about the tentative plans for the water district, which would take water from the Bolton Point plant on the east side of Cayuga Lakeand run it up Route 96 and into Jacksonville. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:31 PM RAN AUG. 2, 2001 The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Campi, Esther Date: Jan 3, 2002 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 1178 Document Text The thirst for dean water Support for new district flows from community tired of taint JACKSONVILLE - For more than 20 years, residents here have spent countless hours worrying about something others hardly think about: water. Since the late 1970s. a series of underground fuel leaks from a gas station have left a legacy of contaminated private wells that chip away at residents' quality of life. Elsewhere in the Town of Ulysses, rock formations beneath the topsoil have made wells unproductive and infused water with stubborn minerals that are hard to cleanse. People in Jacksonville do not take for granted watering their lawns, washing their cars, taking a bath or even reaching for a clean glass of drinking water. Homeowners complain that property values sometimes plunge far below their worth at selling time - or don't sell at all - because of the water problem. Water -dependent businesses think twice before locating here. And fixes proposed in the past have proved costly and elusive. "We've been living with this for years," says Town Supervisor Doug Austic, who is admittedly weary from the struggle. Very soon, however, life could change in Jacksonville. See JACKSONVILLE, 4A Jacksonville (Continued from Page 1A) On Aug. 14, the Ulysses Town Board is poised to vote on a proposed new water District No. 3 that would bring a dean, abundant water supply to the area. The district would tap into the Bolton Point Plant in the Town of Ithaca, drawing enough water to serve about 318 properties on Route 96, including Jacksonville. Public interest is evident. At a public hearing Tuesday night, about 100 people showed up, some wearing T-shirts that read, "Support the Ulysses/Route 96 Water District." Others shouted, 'Thank you" to town leaders. There are still many hurdles to cross, however. The public chat this week raised issues about how district lines are drawn. Residents on Krums Comers Road want off the map, saying their water is dean and they can't stomach paying for a service they don't need. Another group of neighbors on Jacksonville Road between Route 96 and Cold Springs Road wants to be added. During an interview Wednesday, Austic said a swap is likely in the works, which would require another public hearing. But a quick public session could still be held in time for the the Town Board meeting Aug. 14, he said. Funding for the estimated $$@$!3.15 million project is also a concern. The Assembly has agreed to a $$@$!500,000 1 of 3 11/2/13 2:21 PM RAN AUG. 2,2001 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896708.344him... state grant. But more money is sought. Austic hopes to have all of the required plans and agreements in place before a spring deadline to apply for a zero -interest state loan. He also intends to apply for a development grant from the Appalachian Regional Commission. In addition, Assemblyman Marry Luster, D -125th District, who was Ulysses' town supervisor in the 1980s, has asked ExxonMobil Corp. to chip in. Luster said Wednesday that he is still talking with officials there. "I think that they will be making a contribution," he said. "I just don't know how much." Luster understands firsthand the long, tortured route Jacksonville has traveled in search of water. He also knows how the best -laid plans can fail. During his tenure, at least two public votes on a proposed water district stumbled. Then, as now, cost was key. Some areas are more expensive to serve than others, a factor that kept northern areas of Jacksonville from being included in the latest iteration of a District No. 3 map. Luster said during his reign, planners cobbled together a small district, then a larger one, but neither could get costs much below about $$@$!1,500 per family. The strength of today's proposal is that costs have been contained to about $$@$1501 per single-family dwelling per year, a price tag touted as the "magic number" to retain public support and avoid having to seek state approval. Luster said he hasn't taken a comprehensive tally, but that phone callers to his office have all supported the new water district. And Austic said he's confident the board will support the plan Aug. 14, despite some lingering concerns over cost. "I'm tired," Austic admits, after months of working with consultants, Ithaca city officials and the public. "If it gets turned down, I don't know if we can muster the energy to go through it again." To critics, Austic's constant theme these days is that getting some kind of infrastructure in place now, while the momentum is strong, is key. Later, he says, water service can be extended. That possibility, Austic knows, would raise a whole new set of challenges for town leaders tasked with managing the sprawl and growth that are inevitably spurred on by expanded service. Austic said the town's strategic plan limits land available for commercial development with a a balanced tax base in mind, and that he's sensitive to retaining the town's character. Despite a host of last-minute paperwork, procedural hoops and the likelihood of another public hearing, however, Austic remains upbeat that all couldbe in place to begin construction next year. Said Austic: "I'm fairly confident that we can pull this off." By ESTHER CAMPI/Journal Staff Timeline 1978 - Leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks are discovered at a gas station located at the comer of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road. 1988 - ExxonMobil Corp. agrees to an out-of-court settlement brokered by the Department of Environmental Conservation and the state Attorney General's office. 1989 - ExxonMobil Corp. purchases five homes located near the former gas station that were either condemned or vacated, along with the Old Colonial Church on Jacksonville Road. May 1999 - The Jacksonville Community Association circulates petitions asking the Town of Ulysses to investigate formation of a water district. 1999 - A water study commissioned by Barton and Loguidice Consulting Engineers of Syracuse examines four potential sources for a municipal water system: Cayuga Lake, a new groundwater supply, the Town of Ithaca's water supply and 2 of 3 11/2/13 2:21 PM the Village of Trumansburg's water supply. 2000 - Residents learn that the state Department of Environmental Conservation believes there's a new spill from a gas station at the comer of Jacksonville and Trumansburg roads that has leaked the gasoline additive MTBE, a potential carcinogen, into more wells. November 2000 - Assemblyman Martin A. Luster, D -125th (a former Ulysses town supervisor), and current Ulysses Town Supervisor Doug Austic announce that the Assembly has approved a $$@$!500,000 grant to offset the cost of a public water system in Jacksonville. Feb. 14, 2001 - The Ulysses Town Board votes unanimously to spend up to $$@$!60,000 on initial engineering and design costs for the project. March 1, 2001 - At Luster's urging, representatives from the Town of Ulysses and Jacksonville meet with 6oconMobil officials. Luster asks the company to help pay for a new water district. Aug. 14, 2001 - The Ulysses Town Board will vote on whether to create a water district in Jacksonville. The intersection of Jacksonville Road and New York State Route 96, where oil leaks from a gasoline station, discovered in 1978, have polluted water supplies. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The thirst for clean water Support for new district flows from community tired of taint JACKSONVILLE - For more than 20 years, residents here have spent countless hours worrying about something others hardly think about: water. Since the late 1970s, a series of underground fuel leaks from a gas station have left a legacy of contaminated private wells that chip away at residents' quality of life. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 3 of 3 11/2/13 2:21 PM Exxon Mobil to consider assisting Jacksonville The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Jan 10, 2001 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 332 Document Text Firm may help establish municipal water system By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff Exxon Mobil Corp. said it would consider meeting with local lawmakers to discuss an agreement that would help bring municipal water to Jacksonville. Barry Wood, an Exxon Mobil spokesman, said he had received a letter from Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District and a former Ulysses supervisor, which contained a request for a meeting. Luster, in a letter dated Dec. 28, asked Exxon Mobil officials to meet with him and Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic to discuss Ulysses' plans to form a water district for the hamlet of Jacksonville. Luster suggested in the letter that the corporation's best chance for a graceful exit from the community would be helping Jacksonville get a clean, reliable water source. Jacksonville has dealt with periodic leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks since 1978. The leaks came from a Jacksonville gas station, and led to several of the hamlet's residents abandoning their homes. Mobil bought five of the homes and the Old Colonial Church on Jacksonville Road following an out-of-court settlement in 1988. Wood told The Journal Tuesday that Exxon Mobil is considering Luster's requests. "We acknowledge receipt of the assemblyman's letter, and we are considering his invitation to have a discussion, and (considering) providing assistance to Jacksonville," Wood said. He said Exxon Mobil would probably provide an official response to Luster in the next few weeks. Luster said Exxon Mobil's comments were good news. "That's very encouraging," Luster said. "I look forward to their response; I'm very pleased irs positive. Hopefully this will come to fruition and we can put together a package and Gose out a 21 -year-old problem" Austic said the news didn't sound bad, but he'd reserve his comments until he heard officially from Exxon Mobil. "if they're receptive to working out some kind of mutually beneficial situation, that would go a long way to resolving this," said Peg Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Firm may help establish municipal water system By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff Exxon Mobil Corp. said it would I of 2 11/2/13 1:55 I'M Exxon Mobil to consider assisting Jacksonville - The Ithaca Jou... http://pgasb.pgarchivercomrthacajoumal/docl896717766.htm... consider meeting with local lawmakers to discuss an agreement that would help bring municipal water to Jacksonville. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:55 PM Water hot topic in Xville The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Jan 24, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 317 Document Text By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE -Close to 100 people gathered Tuesday at the Jacksonville Community Church to hear more about a possible water district that would serve about 300 homes. The meeting, sponsored by the Jacksonville Community Association, featured a member of the Newfield Town Board, who shared her experiences helping her town form a new water district. Residents are hopeful the $$@$!3.8 million project will be a successful conclusion to their water saga. Beginning in the late 1970s, a series of underground spills from a Jackson-ville gas station polluted the wells of surrounding houses. Mary Beth Holub, chairwoman of Newfield's water committee, said Tuesday night that forming a water district was a complicated exercise that should involve experienced consultants and patience to wade through "more regulations than you ever knew existed." The estimated cost of the proposed Jacksonville water district is now about $$@$!600 per user, per year. Jacksonville Community Association Treasurer Dick Coogan, said his family of two spends about $$@$!530 per year on well water and related costs, including salt for his water softener, electricity for the well pump, and bottled water. Jacksonville Water Com-mittee Chairwoman Diane Hillmann, who lives alone, said problems with the device that chlorinates her water have pushed her annual water costs to about $$@$!938 per year. The entire project could cost as much as $$@$!3.8 million. The Town of Ulysses has been promised a $$@$!500,000 grant from the state, and continues to seek other sources of funding. Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said the town was looking into a variety of federal, state, and commercial grants. In addition, he's waiting to hear from Exxon Mobil, the company responsible for the pollution. A company spokesman said on Jan. 9 it would consider meeting with Austic and Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th district, to discuss helping the community set up a municipal water system. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I of 2 1112!13 2:11 PM Water hot topic in Yvillc - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doe/896718094.htm... Jacksonville Community Association Treasurer Dick Coogan, said his family of two spends about $$@$!530 per year on well water and related costs, including salt for his water softener, electricity for the well pump, and bottled water. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/113 2:11 PM Ulysses The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Feb 14, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 466 Document Text votes for water district By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - The Ulysses Town Board voted unanimously Tuesday night to spend up to $$@$!60,000 on design and consultant costs for a proposed water district for Jacksonville. The vote was another step in the long process of bringing municipal water to the hamlet of Jacksonville, the Ulysses community plagued by contaminated wells for over 20 years. This project, the Town Board estimates, could cost as much as $$@$!3.8 million. Since the late 1970s, a series of underground fuel leaks from a Route 96 gas station polluted private wells, forcing some people out of their homes. Others still depend on bottled water. Most of the money appropriated at Tuesday night's Town Board meeting will be spent on engineering fees for the water district, which would serve around 300 homes. "This will pay for designing and mapping the district, plus legal expenses," said Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic. "This will take us right up to the point where we're ready to form the water district." Austic expected the design phase to be completed by April, with a vote on forming the water district to come shortly after. Legally, a water district can be formed by either a referendum of the people who would be served by the utility, or by resolution of the Town Board. Austic said he was not yet certain which way Water District No. 3, as it is known legally, will be formed. The Syracuse -based engineering firm Barton and Loguidice is designing the proposed district, which will get its water from the Bolton Point Plant in the Town of Ithaca. Once the cost is financed and spread among the district's users, the annual cost will probably be between $$@$!550-$$@$1600 per household. "We're still going to try and bring that cost down," Austic said. He said the town was still looking at funding sources to help defray the cost, including the possibility of a community development block grant. The town is hoping to get an interest-free loan from the state's revolving loan fund to finance the bulk of the project. 1 of 2 11/2/13 3:08 PM Ulysses - The Ithaca Journal: Archives htip://pqasb.pqarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896726039.htm... In November, Assemblyman Martin Luster, D-1 25th District, announced the state had set aside $$@$1500,000 for the water district. In January, Luster asked ExxonMobil, the corporation responsible for the fuel spills, to consider helping Ulysses with the cost of the project. A meeting about a proposed water district, organized by the Jacksonville Community Association, brought out nearly 100 people later that month to hear about the pros and cons of forming a water district. An ExxonMobil spokesman said the company would consider Luster's offer to meet with him. Austic, and a member of the Jacksonville Community Association to discuss Luster's request. No date for such a meeting has yet been set. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is pmNbited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Since the late 1970s, a series of underground fuel leaks from a Route 96 gas station polluted private wells, forcing some people out of their homes. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:08 PM Xville, oil reps to meet soon The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Feb 23, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 305 Document Text By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ITHACA - Exxon Mobil representatives have agreed to sit down with local lawmakers and a Jacksonville resident to discuss helping the community get a municipal water system. The only question is when. Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, sent a letter to company officials in December requesting a meeting with him, Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic, and a representative of the Jacksonville Community Association. Luster asked Exxon Mobil to consider helping the hamlet get a dependable source of clean water. Bary Wood, a spokesman for Exxon Mobil, said in an interview Thursday that a company representative will meet with the group, but the parties have yet to schedule a day. 'The assemblyman asked us to meet with him to discuss supporting (Jacksonville's) efforts financially. We agreed to meet, to sit down and discuss it," Wood said. Thursday, Luster said he wasn't sure what to expect from the meeting. "It will be a private meeting, and we'll discuss the issues, and I can only hope it's positive," he said. Luster expects a meeting "sometime within the next couple weeks," he said. Since 1979, a series of underground fuel spills from a gas station on Route 96 have polluted nearby wells in Jacksonville. In 1989, theMobil Corporatlon purchased six properties that were condemned or vacated because of the fuel spills. Last fall, five of the buildings were razed. The Town of Ulysses has made headway on forming a municipal water district in the area, which would get water from the Bolton Point plant in the Town of Ithaca. The Ulysses Town Board voted Feb. 13 to spend up to $$@$!60,000 on design and engineering costs. The total project could cost $$@$!3.8 million, and town officials have been looking for funding sources to bring the cost down. New York Northeast LOCAL: Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Luster expects a meeting "sometime within the next couple weeks," he said. Since 1979, a series of underground fuel spills from a gas station on Route 96 have polluted nearby wells in Jacksonville. 1 of 2 11 /2/13 2:36 PM Pville, oil reps to meet soon - The Ithaca Journal: Archives littp://pqasb.pqarchiver.comfithacajoumaildoc/896726158.htm... Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 1112/13 2:36 PM Xville, Luster meet with gas reps The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Mar 2, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 374 Document Text By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - Representatives of ExxonMobil Corp. are considering a request to help the hamlet of Jacksonville pay for a proposed water district. Town of Ulysses officals said they would be pleased if ExxonMobil came up with $$@$!500,000 for the project. Four company officals met Thursday with Assemblyman Martin A. Luster, D-1 25th District, Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic, Deputy Supervisor Carolyn Duddleston, and Dick Coogan of the Jacksonville Community Association. The meeting came as a result of a December letter Luster wrote to ExxonMobil, asking it to consider assisting Jacksonville to pay for the proposed $$@$!3.8 million project. ExxonMobil is the company responsible for a series of underground fuel spills from a Jacksonville gas station. The spills, which began in the late 1970s, polluted nearby wells. "We presented our case to (ExxonMobil), it was friendly and cordial ... and they seemed understanding and receptive," Luster said. But, he added, "No one reached for their checkbook." Barry Wood, an ExxonMobil spokesman, said he couldn't yet comment on the meeting. He did not attend, and had not yet spoken with company representatives who met at Ulysses Town Hall. Luster said ExxonMobil officials said they would consider his and Austic's requests, and consult with the corporate decision makers. "We didn't talk about a timetable for a decision," Luster said. Austic said local government officals didn'trequest a specific amount of money from the company, but suggested to them the project would be helped greatly with an additional $$@$!500,000. If the project cost was a half -million dollars less, Austic said, the cost of water service to each user would drop to about $$@$!530 per year. The current cost estimate is about $$@$!570 per year. That drop, Austic said, would make Jacksonville's project more eligible for a low- or no -interest loan from the New York state revolving loan fund. Austic said the Town of Ulysses' loan rating will be officially changed next month, allowing the town to apply for the loan this summer. Representatives from the Department of Environmental Conservation, the agency that monitored the fuel spills, and the state Attorney General's office, who signed off on a 1988 legal agreement on the issue, also attended Thursday's meeting. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A I of 2 1 ]/2/13 2:54 PM Pville, Luster meet with gas reps - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/896723740.htm... Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Austic said local government officials didn'trequest a specific amount of money from the company, but suggested to them the project would be helped greatly with an additional $$@$!500,000. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2113 2:54 PM CITY & COUNTY The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Mar 3, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 300 Document Text Jacksonville residents optimistic on water By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff Officials at ExxonMobil Corp. said Friday it would respond to a local lawmaker's request the corporation help the hamlet of Jacksonville establish a water district. Assemblyman Martin A. Luster, D -125th District, along with representatives from the Town of Ulysses and Jacksonville met with Exxon Mobil officials Thursday to discuss a deal with the company whose fuel leaks contaminated Jacksonville wells since the late 1970s. The company didn't release a statement about the Thursday afternoon meeting until Friday morning. "We were pleased to have an opportunity to discuss Assemblyman Luster's goal of establishing a water district that would include residents of Jacksonville," said spokesman Barry Wood, reading from a prepared statement. "His suggestion will be carefully considered. Upon completion of our assessment and evaluation of the options discussed, we will respond to Assemblyman Luster." Luster and Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic told company officials that the water district project needed $$@$1500,000 to make service more affordable to residents, though they didn't specifically request that amount. Members of the Jacksonville Community Association said ExxonMobil's response was a step in the right direction, despite not knowing what steps, if any, the company will take. "The association didn't have any expectations of a firm outcome following the meeting," said Peg Coogan, the association's president. "We're generally pleased that things seemed to be moving forward." As ExxonMobil considers a response, formation of the proposed water district continues. On Feb. 14, the Ulysses Town Board voted unanimously to spend up to $$@$160,000 on initial engineering and design costs for the project. The district would take water from the Bolton Point Plant in the Town of Ithaca and serve about 350 Town of Ulysses customers on Route 96, including Jacksonville. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Jacksonville residents optimistic on water By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff Officials at ExxonMobil Corp. said Friday it would respond to a local lawmaker's request the corporation help the hamlet of Jacksonville establish a water district. I of 2 1112113 2:32 PM CITY & COUNTY - The Ithaca Joumal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896723844.htm... Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:32 PM Ulysses Town Board holds vote tonight on water district The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Higgins, Dan Date: Aug 14, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Wont Count: 282 Document Text By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff Exxon Mobil Inc. has not yet decided if it will help the hamlet of Jacksonville pay for a dean, municipal water source. The Ulysses Town Board will meet at 7 p.m. tonight, and vote on whether to form Water District No. 3, which would include Jacksonville. The hamlet has had problems with contaminated wells since the late 1970s. Underground fuel leaks from a gas station on Route 96 fouled the wells of a half-dozen homes. Exxon Mobil purchased the homes in 1989 following an agreement with the New York State Attorney General. The company razed the homes in the fall of 2000. Exxon Mobil spokesman Barry Wood said the company was working with the Attorney General's once and Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, to determine if financial help from Exxon Mobil would satisfy the company's obligation to the community. At the time of the original fuel leaks, the gas station was owned by Mobil. "(The decision to help) is intertwined with a whole bunch of other issues, including whether New York will sign off on a consent decree," Wood said. Before the Town Board votes, its members will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the water district. Land on Krums Comers Road is slated to be dropped from the planned new water district, while others on Jacksonville Road are proposed to be added. The water district would serve about 318 properties on Route 96, including Jacksonville. The project is expected to cost $$@$!3.8 million. Barring any help from Exxon Mobil, the town expects to pay for the project by securing a low- or no -interest loan from the state. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) of 2 11!2/13 2:52 PM Ulysses Town Board holds vote tonight on water district - The I... http://pgasb.pqarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896721954.htm... Exxon Mobil spokesman Barry Wood said the company was working with the Attorney General's office and Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, to determine if financial help from Exxon Mobil would satisfy the company's obligation to the community. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:52 PM Ulysses OKs water district The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Aug 15, 2001 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 591 Document Text By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - The Ulysses Town Board voted unanimously Tuesday night to form a municipal water district that would include the Hamlet of Jacksonville. Assuming there are no delays, Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said residents in the 318 homes around Route 96 and Cold Springs Road could be getting clean, reliable water from their taps by December 2002. The total cost for the project to build Water District No. 3 is estimated to be $$@$!3.15 million, or about $$@$1501 annually per household. The town hopes to pay for the project through a low- or no -interest state loan. Construction is expected to take four months, and could start as early as next spring. For residents of Jacksonville, formation of the district marks the beginning of the end of a long battle for dean water. A half-dozen homes were made uninhabitable when their wells were fouled by a number of underground fuel leaks from a Ulysses gas station. Jacksonville residents have been crusading for a municipal water district at least as far back as the 1980s. This is the third, and so far the most successful, attempt to bring municipal water to Jacksonville. Peg and Dick Coogan have been Jacksonville residents for 10 years. They were pleased with the board's decision, but noted there is still more work to be done. "Its time to start getting excited," said Peg Coogan, who is president of the Jacksonville Community Association. "But we're not there yet." Some residents used the public hearing held before the vote to express their disappointment over not being included in the final plans for the district. 'We have the same water problems (as other Ulysses residents): inconsistency, excess of minerals, bacteria," said Roy Coates, a resident of Wilkins Road. He acknowledged that the water situation in his neighborhood isn't as dire as it is in Jacksonville. Coates and other speakers noted that Wilkins Road is also home to the Franziska Racker Center, a facility that helps people with disabilities and their families. Several speakers expressed disappointment, noting that the center would be missing out on municipal water. They questioned the board's decision to leave the Wilkins Road and other neighborhoods out. Austic said that several spurs of the water district listed in the original design - including Duboise, Swamp College and Wilkins roads - were removed to bring down the overall cost of the project. The cost per user had to be kept at $$@$1501 or less in order to be approved at a local level. Otherwise, the state 1 of 2 1112113 2:15 PM Ulysses OKs water district - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/89672024.3.him... would have to evaluate the water district, and its approval would take time and would not be guaranteed, he said. Once the district is built, others can petition to be included. "We had to start somewhere," Austic said. Before the vote was taken, seven properties on Krums Comers Road were removed from the water district, while six properties near Jacksonville Road were added. Both parties had asked for the switch. The board assented because, its members said, the change wouldn't affect the district's cost. Even though the water district, a political designation, has been formed, the town has not yet inked an agreement over the water's source. The hope is to get water from the Bolton Point water plant. That would require separate agreements with the City and Town of Ithaca, which run the plant. The town has discussed the idea with city and town leaders, but no agreement has yet been reached. Jacksonville included, but others disappointed with boundaries New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - The Ulysses Town Board voted unanimously Tuesday night to form a municipal water district that would include the Hamlet of Jacksonville. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:15 PM RAN AUG. 13, 2001 fel The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Date: Aug 31, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 579 Document Text ULYSSES Ulysses Town Board meets Tuesday TRUMANSBURG -The Ulysses Town Board will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, at the Town Hall at 10 Elm St. in Trumansburg. The hearing, just before the regular board meeting, is designed to hear public comment on a change to the proposed Water District No. 3. Parcels of land on Krums Comers Road are slated to be dropped from the planned new water district, while others on Jacksonville Road are proposed to be added. The proposed swap came after a July 31 public hearing in which residents in both areas requested the change. Board members are expected to vote on creation of the new water district immediately after the pubic hearing. Supporters say the proposed new water district, which would tap into Ithaca's water system, would draw enough water to serve about 318 properties on Route 96, including Jacksonville. Since the late 1970s in Jacksonville, a series of underground fuel leaks from a gas station has polluted drinking water. Most homes in the area are served by private wells, and previous attempts to create a municipal water system have failed. CITY OF ITHACA FLIC book club meets Aug. 15 ITHACA - The Finger Lakes Independence Center book dub will meet from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, at FLIC, 609 W. Clinton St. (Center Street entrance). The book selected for discussion is "Pigs in Heaven" by Barbara Kingsolver. New members are always welcome. The group normally meets on the second Wednesday of each month. For more information, call Debby or Larry at 272-2433. Flower sale benefits cancer research ITHACA - Ithaca area gardeners are hosting a "Plants for Life" sale to benefit the Ithaca Cancer Network and the Ithaca Breast Cancer Alliance. Mark your calendars. The sale will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Women's Community Building in Ithaca. It will feature hundreds of plants, some rare and all cultivated in the private gardens of more than 40 gardeners from throughout the area; by the greenhouse crew of the Ken Post Labs at Cornell University, members of the Bailey Hortorium, Cornell Plantations, the Cornell Hortus Forum; and by several specialty nurseries. A silent auction of selected plant treasures also will be held. Volunteers are needed to help with the sale. For more information or to offer donations of time or money, call Susanne Lipari at (387) 9308 or sel3@comell.edu. SENECA COUNTY I of 2 11/2/13 2:40 PM RAN AUG. 13, 2001 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/89672601 I htm... State parks offer boating safety ROMULUS - The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation is hosting a boater safety class for underage boaters, as well as anyone operating a personal watercraft. The Gass, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m on Aug. 28-29, will take place in the Park Headquarters Building at Sampson State Park on Route 96A in Romulus. Students who complete the class will receive a safety certificate required of underage boaters, as well as operators of personal watercraft. Students have to attend each session and the Gass is limited to 25 students. To register, call (888) 274-6121. State law requires all boat operators under 18 to take and pass a course in boating safety. And as of Jan. 1, 2004, all operators of personal watercrafts will need a certificate, as well, with younger drivers required to take the course earlier. A list of safety courses and boating safety can be found on the state parks' Web site at www.nysparks.com/boats. New York Northeast LOCAL: Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Supporters say the proposed new water district, which would tap into Ithaca's water system, would draw enough water to serve about 318 properties on Route 96, including Jacksonville. Since the late 1970s in Jacksonville, a series of underground fuel leaks from a gas station has polluted drinking water. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:40 PM CITY & COUNTY The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Nov 1, 2001 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 509 Document Text DEC to rule on ExxonMobil obligation By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - The commissioner of the state'sEnvironmental Conservation Department is considering releasing ExxonMobil Corp. from further legal obligations in the hamlet of Jacksonville. Under a 1988 agreement, ExxonMobil has been responsible for maintaining seven properties in Jacksonville, as well as periodic testing and monitoring of an underground fuel spill. In 1979, an underground spill at the Jacksonville gas station contaminated the wells of seven properties near the intersection of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road. ExxonMobil eventually purchased the properties allowing six of the residents to relocate. In 2000, ExxonMobil - with the DEC's permission - razed five of the abandoned homes. An ExxonMobil spokesman said Wednesday that even if the state lifted the consent order, it would have no bearing on the company's decision of whether to help the Tompkins County hamlet pay for a new water district. Spokesman Bary Wood said there's still no decision on whether to contribute, how much money might be involved, or a timetable for a decision to be made. The water district, estimated at about $$@$13 million to install, would serve about 300 homes along Route 96, including homes in Jacksonville. Since that initial spill, fuel leaked into the ground several other times, including after ExxonMobil sold the gas station, which is currently owned by the Blueox Corporation. The subsequent spills following ExxonMobil's sale of the gas station seems to be the reason cited by DEC commissioner Erin Crotty for considering lifting the order. "My staff has confirmed that additional gasoline spills were reported at the site after Mobil sold the property, including a recent release involving the current owner," Crotty wrote in a letter to Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District. "My staff is reviewing new data from the Blueox spill investigation which may help determine whether Mobil has completed its remedial obligations," Crotty wrote. "We expect to know by the end of the month whether any additional data is needed." Crotty was not available for comment Wednesday aftemoon. Luster said he was under the impression that the state's lifting of the consent order might convince ExxonMobil to help. Last March, ExxonMobil representatives met with Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic, Assemblyman Martin Luster, D -125th District, and representatives of the Jacksonville Community Association, to discuss the possibility of ExxonMobil helping the community pay for a municipal water system. I of 2 1112113 2:37 PM Cn,f & COUNTY - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896722672.htm... But Wood insisted that wasn't the case. "The two issues aren't coupled, I don't know who thought they were," Wood said. "We've been trying for some time to have (the consent order) end. We feel we've done our part," he said. Richard Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association, said he would be satisfied if Mobil left the community, so long as there was some kind of financial settlement. "I think ExxonMobil needs to recognize there was community harm done. There should be some payment to help restore the community," he said. "But we're ready to move on." Officials: Other owners of J-ville gas station contributed to contamination New York Northeast LOCAL,, Pg. 1 B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The water district, estimated at about $$@$!3 million to install, would serve about 300 homes along Route 96, including homes in Jacksonville. Since that initial spill, fuel leaked into the ground several other times, including after ExxonMobil sold the gas station, which is currently owned by the Blueox Corporation. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/113 2:37 I'M RAN SEPT. 17, 2001 The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author Higgins, Dan Date: Nov 16, 2001 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 446 Document Text Ulysses has to hold 2nd water district hearing By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - A ruling by the state comptroller's office meant that the Town of Ulysses had to have a second public hearing on the water district that will eventually serve the hamlet of Jacksonville. Ulysses Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said that no one attended the second public hearing, which was advertised Aug. 29 in The Ithaca Journal, and held Tuesday night at Ulysses Town Hall, the day of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. The second hearing was needed, Austic said, because the comptroller's office said the legal advertisement of the hearing wasn't specific enough. The original advertisement, which appeared in The Journal on July 16, stated that the hearing would be held concerning a water district, the boundaries of which were available for public inspection in the Town Clerk's office. Two days after the public hearing on Aug. 14, where the Town Board voted unanimously to form a municipal water district, the comptroller's office said the hearing wasn't valid; the legal advertisement needed to specifically outline each of the 300 tax parcels that would be included in the proposed water district. "We definitely thought we would be OK with the original notice," said Austic. "But I guess we weren't, so we did it again." The practical effects of having another public hearing on Tuesday means that people living within the water district now have until Oct. 11 to mount a campaign to stop the district. Called a permissive referendum, any property owner within the boundaries of the new district who collects signatures from 5 percent of the distrid's landowners can force a public vote on the water district. Austic said that since the original public hearing on Aug. 14, no one has expressed any interest in mounting the legal challenge against the district. "No one has even picked up the petition forms from Town Hall," Austic said. The water district would mean the first clean, reliable source of water for Jacksonville. The community has been dealing with the effects from underground fuel leaks from a Jacksonville gas station since the late 1970s. The gas station was owned by Mobil when the leaks occurred. Exxon Mobil Inc. officials said they would consider helping Jacksonville pay for the water district, which is expected to cost $$@$!3.15 million. On Friday, spokesman Barry Wood said no decision has been made yet. Austic said that despite being forced to hold a second public hearing, the Town Board is moving ahead as planned, and will apply for a low- or no -interest loan from the state next month. New York Northeast I of 2 11 /2/13 2:48 PM RAN SEPT. 17, 2001 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doe/89671456i.htm... LOCAL; Pg. 1B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Two days after the public hearing on Aug. 14, where the Town Board voted unanimously to form a municipal water district, the comptroller's office said the hearing wasn't valid; the legal advertisement needed to specifically outline each of the 300 tax parcels that would be included in the proposed water district. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:481'M RAN JULY 31, 2001 131 The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Bishop, Lauren Date: Nov 22, 2001 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 384 Document Text Hearing on Jacksonville water supply tonight By LAUREN BISHOP Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - A public hearing on a proposed water district in Jacksonville tonight could mark the near -end of the hamlet's more -than -20 -year-old struggle for a clean, abundant water supply. If residents show support for the district at tonight's meeting, the Ulysses Town Board would likely vote to officially form the district at its Aug. 14 meeting, Supervisor Doug Austic said Monday. In Jacksonville, where private wells have been contaminated and homes have been made uninhabitable by underground fuel spills from a gas station, past attempts to form a water district have failed because of high costs. But Jacksonville residents and Ulysses town officials are hopeful that this effort will succeed, thanks to a $$@$!500,000 state grant, the likelihood of a zero -interest state loan and support from residents at past public hearings. The total cost is estimated to be $$@$13.15 million. With financial assistance from the state in place, the town's hired consultants, Syracuse -based Barton and Loguidice Consulting Engineers, have estimated that it would cost each household about $$@$!500 for municipal water, based on a district that serves 318 properties. That amount includes the cost of the water, operation and maintenance of the system and debt service on the loan. It's less than what many Jacksonville residents have said they now spend to maintain their wells. "This is a good deal," Austic said. He noted that initial estimates of annual costs were $$@$!1,500 or more two years ago when the town investigated a larger water district that would serve more areas of the town. As proposed now, the system would connect with the City of Ithaca's water system near Iradell Road on Route 96, where a new water tower and pump station would be built. The system would serve properties on Route 96 and Perry City, Jacksonville, and Cold Springs roads, but other residents could petition the town to be added to the system after its built. Construction could take place next year, if the town makes the mid-October deadline for applying for the zero -interest loan from the state's revolving loan fund. The hearing will be at the Arthur E. Bouton American Legion at the comer of Route 96 and Seneca Road just past the Village of Trumansburg. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) In Jacksonville, where private wells have been contaminated and homes have been made uninhabitable by I of 2 11/2/13 2:23 PM ROAN JULY 31,2001 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives hitp://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/896714689.htm... underground fuel spills from a gas station, past attempts to form a water district have failed because of high costs. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2113 2:23 PM Wells given clean bill of health The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Dec 3, 2001 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 565 Document Text DEC monitors areas around former convenience store By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff DANBY - Residue from underground fuel leaks have migrated from a defunct gas station in Danby but do not pose a threat to drinking water supplies, environment and health officials said. The state Department of Environmental Conservation has been monitoring a handful of test wells near the former Benjamin's One Stop, at 1860 Danby Road, since February. Spill engineers have also tested several private water wells in the area, as has the Tompkins County Department of Public Health. Officials from both agencies said no one's drinking water has been contaminated. But dissolved particles from spilled gasoline and oil have been turning up in the groundwater, according to monitoring reports from test wells near the site. "Ifs running parallel to Route 96B, in a north -north-westerly direction," said DEC spill engineer Gary Peterson. The dissolved contaminates have not apparently crossed the road. And, Peterson said, he doesn't think the chemicals in the ground pose a threat to the homes, businesses and church in the center of the Town of Danby. Removing gas tanks The convenience store was destroyed by fire, blamed on a spark from a faulty ice cream cooler's compressor, in spring 1999. DEC crews spent seven days cleaning the site last May, removing four underground gas tanks and replacing much of the soil there with clean fill. Peterson said the area is much safer now that the source of the contamination has been removed, but he's convinced some pollution remains. "Is it spic and span? No. Is it cleaner than it used to be? Definitely," Peterson said. Tompkins County Public Health Engineer Stephen Maybee tested two wells in the neighborhood of Benjamin's One Stop. One of those wells belongs to Alan Soule, who has lived at 5 Bald Hill Road since 1965. Soule said he has never had a problem with his well water and, until the health department contacted him, had never considered the possibility that the defunct filling station contaminating his well. "It really never crossed my mind," he said. 1 of 2 11 /2113 3:34 PM Wells given clean bill of health - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doe/896715776.htm... Maybee said he plans to test Soule's well one more time by the end of the year, but isn't concerned he'll find contamination. Jacksonville spill The underground fuel leaks and well -water testing recalls the situation in Jacksonville, in the Town of Ulysses. A half-dozen people were forced from their homes in the 1980s after an underground petroleum spill contaminated wells near a Jacksonville Road gas station. But both health officials said the Benjamin's One Stop spill does not offer an adequate comparison. "This is nothing compared to Jacksonville," Peterson said. Cleanup costs $$@$!102K As of Friday, the DEC has spent $$@$!102,579 on the site's cleanup. The money came from the state's oil -spill -cleanup fund. Typically, the state attorney general's office then tries to collect the cleanup money from the property owners or other "responsible parties," according to a spokesman in the attorney general's office. But a DEC spokesman said Friday the case had just been referred to the attorney general's office, and no collection procedures have begun. Neither Robert nor Linda Wilson, who have owned the property since 1995, could be reached for comment. The Town of Danby has hired contractors to raze the store beginning Dec. 11, under the town's unsafe buildings ordinance. Town officials estimate the demolition will cost between $$@$113,000 and $$@$!15,000. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) DEC monitors areas around former convenience store By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff DANBY - Residue from underground fuel leaks have migrated from a defunct gas station in Danby but do not pose a threat to drinking water supplies, environment and health officials said. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:34 PM RAN AUG. 1, 2001 fel The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Campi, Esther Date: Jan 3, 2002 Start Page: A.2 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 438 Document Text Jacksonville water meeting draws 100 By ESTHER CAMPI Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Ulysses Town Board officials are a step closer to voting on a proposed new water district in Jacksonville following a public hearing Tuesday night. A full -room crowd of about 100 turned out to tell tales of low water pressure, plunging property values, and contaminated private wells that are the legacy of underground fuel spills in the hamlet. A proposed new $$@$!3.15 million water system would conned with the City of Ithaca's water system near Iradell Road on Route 96, where a new water tower and pump station would be built. Based on a district that serves about 318 properties, the average cost per single-family household is estimated to be about $$@$!500, down significantly from estimates of $$@$!1,500 or more two years ago. Bob Carpenter, 5360 Perry City Road, said residents can't water their lawns, wash their cars or have clean drinking water, and that his father recently had to sell his home at half the assessed value because of the hamlet's water -supply problems. In addition, Carpenter said, new businesses are wary of locating in Jacksonville because water is an issue. "We've just got to realize how important it is." Several in the crowd shouted, `Thank you" to town leaders. Others sported T-shirts that read, "Support the Ulysses/ Route 96 Water District." The meeting at the Arthur E. Bouton American Legion building was not without controversy, however. Christian Boissonnas, 5214 Jacksonville Road, read a letter signed by him and six neighbors who are upset that the proposed water district lines cut them out. The group own homes on Jacksonville Road between Route 96 and Cold Springs Road, and claim a $$@$!500,000 state grant for the project specifically targets addresses affected by gasoline spills. Supervisor Doug Austic acknowledged that property values in Carpenter's neighborhood have been affected, but said water quality has not. Other critics had a reverse complaint. AI and Marilyn Rakowski, 3360 Krums Comers Road, said their water is dean and abundant, and they'll fight to keep from paying for a service they don't need. At the meeting's end, Austic defended the current proposal as "the best -priced, best system we're going to come up with" that keeps costs low enough to avoid a lengthy state approval process. Austic said the Town Board will likely vote on the proposal at its Aug. 14 meeting. He said construction could begin next I of 2 11/2/13 3:13 PM RAN AUG. 1, 2001 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives htip://pgasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doe/896708270.htm... year if the town makes early spring deadlines for applying for a zero -interest loan from the state's revolving loan fund. Most voice support for $$@$!3.15M proposal, although some feel excluded New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 2A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Bob Carpenter, 5360 Perry City Road, said residents can't water their lawns, wash their cars or have clean drinking water, and that his father recently had to sell his home at half the assessed value because of the hamlet's water -supply problems. Reproduced with permission of time copyright owner. Further n:producdon or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:13 PM ABOUT TOWN The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Jan 19, 2002 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 420 Document Text DAN HIGGINS Jacksonville residents waiting for water By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ITHACA - Jacksonville residents should know by March if the Town of Ulysses will get an interest-free $$@$13 million loan to finance a proposed water district in the hamlet. Town officials hope to secure the money from the state's revolving loan fund. The Ulysses Town Board formed the district in August. The plan adopted then would serve around 300 households, using water from the Bolton Point water plant in the village of Lansing. "We sent (the state) an incomplete application, because we're still waiting for an agreement with the City of Ithaca," said Doug Austic, Ulysses supervisor. Bolton Point's water is controlled jointly by the city and town of Ithaca, and the village of Lansing. Austic said there was no problem in negotiations with the city to eventually buy water for the new district, other than the talks were taking longer than he had hoped. "The state said they wanted the application, even if it was incomplete. I don't know if that's a good sign or what," he said. The water district, once built, would fill a need for Jacksonville residents that began over two decades ago. Beginning in the late 1970s, a series of underground leaks from fuel storage containers at a Jacksonville gas station contaminated the drinking water wells of a half-dozen homes. The community has been trying since then to bring municipal water to its residents. At the time of the original spills, the gas station was owned by Mobil, Inc. Community leaders including Austic and Assemblyman Martin Luster, D-1 25th District, met with representatives from the presently named ExxonMobil in February to ask if the company would consider helping the town finance the water district. ExxonMobil spokesman Barry Wood said this week that the idea has never been given serious consideration, because he had never received a written request from anyone linked to Jacksonville. In fact, Wood told The Journal a year ago that he had received a letter from Luster requesting the meeting which took place in February. At that time, Wood said of Lusters letter, "We're considering his invitation to have a discussion, and (considering) providing assistance to Jacksonville" 1 of 2 11/2/13 3:00 PM ABOUT TOWN -The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896707769.htm... Luster said this week he thought the company had indeed considered offering financial assistance, but thinks that Wood's statement represents an attempt to retreat from that position. Dan Higgins covers town and county government news in Tompkins County. He can be reached at 2749232 or dehiggin@-ithaca.gannett.com. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1 B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) [... j Wood told The Journal a year ago that he had received a letter from Luster requesting the meeting which took place in February. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:00 PM Gas station under scrutiny The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Feb 8, 2002 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 656 Document Text DEC monitors Jacksonville spot with history of problems By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - Contractors are scheduled to finish searching for leaks today at a Jacksonville gas station with a history of underground fuel contamination. But, as of late Thursday afternoon, 'There is no indication of gasoline contamination," around the pipes or tanks, said Chris Mannes an environmental engineer from the Department of Environmental Conservation's Syracuse office. Mannes said Thursday the excavation around the fuel pumps at the Nice N Easy convenience store, 1854 Jacksonville Road, was undertaken as a precaution, with the cooperation of the property owner. Recent tests using new technology raised concerns that there might be a small leak in the pipes that connect the four 4,000 -gallon fuel storage tanks and the gas pumps, or a small hole in the side of one of the double -walled tanks themselves. The wells of two nearby properties have been showing slightly elevated levels of methyl tertiary -butyl ether, known as MTBE, and benzene, another volatile organic compound that signals the presence of petroleum, since 1999, officials said. But the station had passed a number of pressure tests, which would detect large leaks. DEC officials said pressure tests are fallible, and the presence of the chemicals in the nearby wells added to suspicion that prompted further testing. The decision to dig came after a recent battery of soil tests using Tracer, a volatile petroleum distillate introduced into the storage tanks about a month ago. Shortly after the easily identifiable chemicals are poured in the tanks, crews take soil samples from around the underground tanks. If any Tracer - a brand-name compound designed specifically to test for leaky fuel tanks - is present in the soil, "It suggests that there's a problem," said Dick Brazell, the DEC's regional spill engineer, who is based in Syracuse. The goal of the dig is to physically examine the soil for leaks. The gas station is owned by the Blueox Corp. of Oxford, N.Y. Blueox president Neil Bartle paid for the Tracer testing and notified the DEC of the results. Bartle first suggested that digging around the tanks would be an appropriate measure, but, Mannes added, "We would have asked him to do it if he hadn't suggested it first." Bartle said, "My attitude is, if there's a problem, let's dig it up right now and see what we can find. I'm the guy on the hook, so I'll either do it now or later," he said. 1 of 2 11 /2/13 2:51 PM Gas station under scrutiny - The Ithaca Journal: Archives hitp://pqasb.pqarchivcr.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896707652.htm... Bartle, whose company owns 10 gas stations, first leased the gas station in 1992, purchasing it about four years later, he said. He knew at the time he was buying a gas station with a history of environmental problems. Periodic leaks from the underground fuel storage tanks have polluted drinking water wells near the gas station since the late 1970s. The leaks first occurred when the station was owned by the Mobil Corporation. Mobil (now Exxon Mobil Corp.), under a consent decree issued from the state Attorney General's office in 1989, is still responsible for monitoring groundwater in the area. It was under the same agreement that Mobil was compelled to buy six homes from property owners who had to abandon the houses because of fouled drinking water. In the two decades since Jacksonville's water problems began, residents there have made several attempts to acquire municipal water and abandon their private wells. In 2001, the Town of Ulysses formed a water district, a move that represented the most progress made on the issue to date. Ulysses officials are waiting to hear if the town qualifies for a $$@$!3 million, zero -interest loan from New York state to build the water system, which would serve about 300 homes. SIMON WHEELER/Joumal Staff Employees of Cortland Pump and Equipment Company and Sherman Vincent Associates General Contractors Thursday afternoon remove the concrete above the gasoline storage tanks at the gas station in Jacksonville. New York Northeast LOCAL; Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The wells of two nearby properties have been showing slightly elevated levels of methyl tertiary -butyl ether, known as MTBE, and benzene, another volatile organic compound that signals the presence of petroleum, since 1999, officials said. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:51 PM Cracks, but no leaks in tanks The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Feb 9, 2002 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 505 Document Text Jacksonville station's new owner says he'll replace cracked filler pipes By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - A day and a half of digging at a Jacksonville gas station yielded no discoveries of underground fuel leaks. Officials from the state's Department of Environmental Conservation did, however, find small cracks in the filler pipe used by tanker trucks to refuel the underground tanks. But officials aren't sure that fact alone represents any hazard. Regional spill supervisor Dick Brazell said the DEC would study the findings and release a report in the next two weeks. The gas station's owner on Friday said he planned to replace the piping now that he has already paid to tear up the ground above it. Neil Bartle, owner of the Blueox Corp., of Oxford, hired a contractor to dig to the top of the four 4,000 -gallon tanks in front of the Nice N Easy convenience store, 1854 Jacksonville Road, after a soil test suggested fuel may have escaped into the soil. DEC engineers said they took the possibility of soil contamination seriously, given the history of the site. Leaks from tanks at that same gas station had fouled the drinking water of nearby homes and businesses in several spills since the late 1970s. Bartle said he has been in disagreement with the DEC over whether a spill occurred in 1998. Testing of nearby wells since then have produced spikes in the levels of methyl tertiary -butyl ether {MTBE}, and benzene, suggesting the presence of petroleum in the groundwater. But Bartle's double -walled tanks, installed in 1986, have repeatedly passed pressure tests designed to detect leaks. One month ago, Blueox's environmental consultant tried a new test, at the DEC's behest, using a chemical called Tracer. Tracer is poured into the fuel tanks, and after approximately 10 days, the soil around the tanks is tested for Tracer, which moves rapidly from a liquid to a gaseous state. The Tracer test came up positive, prompting this week's digging. But the physical inspection of the soil revealed no petroleum. "if there's something wrong that you can point to that's my problem, just let me know and I'll take care of it." Bartle said, noting he is sympathetic with Jacksonville residents' long history of water problems. "I just want to be a good corporate citizen ... but now there's nothing you can point to." Thursday, environmental engineer Chris Mannes said the Tracer tests have been available for "the last year or two." Jacksonville residents have stated their support for Bartle's cooperation with the DEC. 1 of 2 11/2/13 3:29 PM Cracks, but no leaks in tanks - The Ithaca Journal: Archives hitp://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/896707599.htm... "Mr. Bartle acted promptly and responsibly to the situation. He did more than was required by the DEC by having the tanks and piping exposed and physically checked at his expense and loss of revenue," said Richard Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association, Bartle said it will be at least three to four weeks, "unless I hear something else from the DEC," before the concrete is replaced over the tanks and business is back to normal. New York Northeast LOCAL: Pg. 1 B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Testing of nearby wells since then have produced spikes in the levels of methyl tertiary -butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene, suggesting the presence of petroleum in the groundwater. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:29 PM RAN MAY 16, 2002 The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: May 29, 2002 Start Page: A.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 383 Document Text Ulysses qualifies for state water loan By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ULYSSES - After 23 years, dean water and the money to pay for it could finally come rushing through the Hamlet of Jacksonville. The Town of Ulysses officially learned this week that it is eligible for a no -interest loan from the state to help pay for a municipal water system after decades of dealing with wells polluted by underground gasoline spills. The town still has to submit the project to a formal review by the state funding agency, but officials at the local and state levels say they are confident that they will finally prevail in their effort to provide a municipal water supply to about 370 homes and businesses. The state's Environmental Facilities Corporation said in a letter to Town Hall Monday that Ulysses qualifies for an interest-free, $$@$12.65 million loan from the state Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. That money, in addition to a $$@$!500,000 grant from a state program, will likely cover the cost of a municipal water system. "I keep telling people: Have faith, this will happen," Town Supervisor Douglas Austic said. Plans for municipal water in Jacksonville have come and gone since the late 1970s, when underground fuel tanks at a neighborhood gas station fouled water in a half-dozen private wells on Route 96 and Jacksonville Roads. Those homes eventually were bought and demolished by what is now Exxon Mobil, which owned the station at the time of the leaks. The last serious effort to abandon wells and bring municipal water to Jacksonville occurred in the mid-1980s, but that bid lacked enough public support to succeed. This attempt, as it nears completion, is welcome news to Assemblyman Martin Luster, D-1 25th District. The Ulysses resident and former town supervisor has served as a liaison between the state and town governments and the Jacksonville Community Association. "We're pretty excited. This is the end of the beginning," said Susan Pratt, Luster's administrative aide. Richard Coogan, president of the Community Association, said he and other residents were told months ago, informally, that the funding would be approved. Still, he said, it's nice to have the state's support in writing. Austic said that if the project stays on schedule, construction could begin by spring 2003. New York Northeast LOCAL: Pg. 1A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I ort 11/2/13 2:50 PM RAV MAY 16, 2002 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercomfithacajournal/doc/896706961.htm... The Town of Ulysses officially learned this week that it is eligible for a no -interest loan from the state to help pay for a municipal water system after decades of dealing with wells polluted by underground gasoline spills. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2of2 11/2!132:50 PM Ulysses The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Sep 19, 2002 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 424 Document Text to take 2nd shot at water request By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff The Town of Ulysses will have another chance this month to clear a sticking point that is holding up a municipal water system for the people of Jacksonville. The Ulysses Town Board is trying to build a water pumping station on a slice of land in the Town of Ithaca. Ithaca's Zoning Board of Appeals turned Ulysses down last month, due in part to objections raised by town residents. Ulysses Town Board members thought the ruling was arbitrary, and based too heavily on the statements the residents made at an Aug. 19 meeting. Instead of suing, though, Ulysses attorney Bruce Wilson said the Town Board is applying again, after tweaking some details which it hopes will be more acceptable to the zoning board. "There were some concerns about noise, which I think we've addressed," Wilson said. The pumping station would move water into Ulysses, where residents of the hamlet of Jacksonville have been fighting for a municipal water supply since underground gasoline leaks fouled a handful of wells beginning in the late 1970s. The municipal water system would eventually take water from the Bolton Point water treatment plant, through the Town of Ithaca. Ulysses officials have argued that the pumping station, in addition to getting water to Jacksonville, would also solve chronic low -water -pressure problems for Town of Ithaca residents on West Hill. Last month, however, the Zoning Board of Appeals denied the town's application to build the station on Town of Ithaca land, citing the fact that it would be 15 feet too close to the road under present zoning. Ithaca residents at the August meeting also complained that the station would be too noisy. Andrew Frost, the Town of Ithaca's zoning officer, said more specific information about how West Hill residents in Ithaca will benefit from the project could reflect better this time on Ulysses' application. "A Zoning Board of Appeals is a quasi-judicial body, and they have to way the benefits of a project, which in this case is a lot of people, against the detriment of a few," he said. Wilson wouldn't explain how the new application deals with the noise issue, saying only that he'll present it at the Zoning Board of Appeals' Sept. 23 meeting. 1 of 1112/133: 10 PM Ulysses - The Ithaca Journal: Archives htip://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doct896704114.htm... Once the pumping station issue is straightened out, Ulysses officials can then put out to bid the water district project, at an anticipated cost of $$@$13.15 million. If there are no other delays, constructions could begin next spring. LOCAL; Pg. 1B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The municipal water system would eventually take water from the Bolton Point water treatment plant, through the Town of Ithaca. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 111/2/13 3:10 PM EDITORIAL The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Date: Sep 20, 2002 Start Page: A.9 Section: EDITORIALS Text Word Count: 388 Document Text Seeking intermunicipal cooperation Town of Ithaca zoning board should approve water project If there ever was a time for a zoning board to show some flexibility, this is it. At issue is zoning board permission that is needed for a project to extend public water from the Town of Ithaca system out to Jacksonville in the Town of Ulysses. The water would flow to a neighborhood that has experienced serious groundwater pollution caused by a leaky gasoline tank at a service station. Currently, residents in that neighborhood get their water from private wells, so the town is trying to obtain a safe water supply for them. If the project goes through, it would include the construction of a water tower, water lines, plus a pumping station that would be located on Woolf Road in the Town of Ithaca. Last month, Ithaca's zoning board of appeals turned the project down. The negative decision reportedly was in response to local concerns about noise that could come from the pumping station. Ulysses officials have modified the project to address the noise concerns and are applying to the Ithaca Board once again. With those concerns addressed, Ithaca is in a win-win situation: Aside from the good neighbor aspect of this project, Ithaca stands to gain approximately $$@$!500,000 worth of municipal improvements: The project would increase water pressure and flow to Woolf Road and sections of Trumansburg Road in the Town of Ithaca, where the water pressure is so low today that several fire hydrants are inoperable. In addition, the new water tower would provide at least two days of reserve capacity in the event of a power outage. "The Town of Ithaca would get better water pressure, better redundancy in our system, and fire hydrants that actually will work, noted Town of Ithaca Supervisor Catherine Valentino' And in addition to the municipal improvements, there is a significant humanitarian aspect to it. "It's being thoughtful of people who are in a serious situation," Valentino says. "We always talk of intermunicipal cooperation. This is a really good example of trying to help each other out." We think that Valentino is cored. Ithaca's town board and planning board have signed off in this project. We urge the zoning board to reconsider its past decision and allow this project to go through. EDITORIALS; Pg. 9A Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) 1 of 2 11/2/13 3:30 PM EDITORIAL - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doet896704393.htm... Seeking intermunicipal cooperation Town of Ithaca zoning board should approve water project If there ever was a time for a zoning board to show some flexibility, this is it. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 1112113 3:30 PM Ulysses to file land claim The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Higgins, Dan Date: Sep 26, 2002 Start Page: B.1 Section: LOCAL Text Word Count: 370 Document Text Town pursues eminent domain to build water pump By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ITHACA - The Town of Ulysses will soon start an eminent domain proceeding against Town of Ithaca residents, so Ulysses officials can build a water pumping station on Woolf Lane. Woolf Lane residents said they're seeking legal advice, and they will sue to fight the procedure. The pumping station will help move water from the City of Ithaca to the Town of Ulysses, including the hamlet of Jacksonville. Jacksonville is a small community in Ulysses plagued by polluted wells stemming from underground gasoline spills dating from the late 1970s. The Town of Ithaca's Zoning Board of Appeals granted Ulysses a variance to build the one-story pumping station this week, after turning down a similar application a month ago. "We're not totally happy with the decision," said Sydney Merritt, who has lived at 127 Woolf Lane for the past nine years, just a few yards from where the pumping station would be built. "This is a residential neighborhood, and we are against any use of land here that is not residential," Merritt said. The property owners have a clause in their deeds, a restrictive covenant, which protects that right, he said. But Bruce Wilson, an attorney for the Town of Ulysses, said that restriction can be overturned by a State Supreme Court judge, through the process of eminent domain. Towns are limited in exercising eminent domain proceedings against residents of other towns, but there are a few exceptions. One of those exceptions is in a joint municipal water project, Wilson said. "There's no defense against eminent domain, unless the project is not for a public benefit, and this project is," he said. Richard Coogan of the Jacksonville Community Association said Wednesday his group welcomes the decision by the zoning board, and he rejects Merritt's and his neighbors' argument that a pumping station would lower their property values. "This is the classic anti -infrastructure argument," Coogan said. "Property values there will most likely be increased because of the new water district because there will be adequate pressure to West Hill. Fire hydrants that now are nonfunctional will be available in case of a fire," he said. LOCAL; Pg. 1B Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) I of 2 1112/13 3:11 PM Ulysses to file land claim - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercomrithacajoumal/doc/896704458.htm... Town pursues eminent domain to build water pump By DAN HIGGINS Journal Staff ITHACA - The Town of Ulysses will soon start an eminent domain proceeding against Town of Ithaca residents, so Ulysses officials can build a water pumping station on Woolf Lane. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibfted without permission. 2of2 11/21133:11 PM EDITORIAL The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Date: Dec 26, 2002 Start Page: A.10 Section: Editorials Text Word Count: 663 Document Text Ulysses wells Water projects benefit town Proposed municipal water systems often produce oceans of controversy before a single drop flows. Taxpayers often are rankled by their high expense. Conservationists sometimes oppose them because these projects can pave the way for development that turns the country into the suburbs. In the Town of Ulysses, opposition to new municipal water systems is virtually nonexistent due to nagging problems of quality and quantity. Dozens of Ulysses homeowners are bedeviled by water that was polluted by a former service station. Others contend with tap water that carries the smell of rotten eggs. Some water has unacceptable levels of nitrates. In other cases, there simply an insufficient supply. For these very good reasons, Ulysses residents are petitioning their town board to go ahead with new water projects. Ulysses residents have requested three new water districts: one on Dubois Road and another that will serve homes roughly from the Village of Trumansburg line on South Street all the way to Podunk and Waterburg roads. In addition, the town is working on a new district in Jacksonville that will serve homes that were affected by the former Mobil service station whose underground tanks leaked petroleum into the groundwater decades ago. The town board, to its credit, is strongly backing the new water systems. Ulysses isn't a big place, but its officials recognize that a safe and adequate water supply is one of the basic expectations that people will demand of a govemment. "We're 100 percent behind this," said Ulysses town council member Lee Scott. 'The constituents of the community have been struggling with water problems for 20 to 25 years. It's time to do something about it. We'll get the job done." According to Scott, the new water districts on Dubois Road and on South Street are nearing completion and the town hopes to break ground on the Jacksonville project in the spring of 2003. To some outside observers, the mere existence of water supply problems in Tompkins County is ironic, even humorous. After all, there is a lake with trillions of gallons of dean water that literally is in sight of many problem wells. But the cost and frequent opposition to new water districts has made it impractical to extend municipal systems to outlying areas. Besides Ulysses, there are spotty water problems in local towns such as Caroline, Danby, Lansing and Newfield. Perhaps the situation in Ulysses is a harbinger for future municipal issues: As local populations expand, some of these towns will have to face the expense of a municipal water system, such as the ones that exist in West Danby and Newfield. Or they will need to follow Caroline's lead and absorb the high cost of conducting aquifer studies to determine how much usable water there actually is. Wish List 2002 The Joumal has invited not-for-profit agencies in Tompkins County to send their wish lists of tasks that need to be done by volunteers. These wish lists will appear on the opinion page from now until Dec. 31. Interested agencies should send these lists to: Volunteer clo Opinion Page, Ithaca Journal, 123 W State St., Ithaca. NY 14850. Or email the wish lists to jschwartz@Khaca.gannett.com and write 'Volunteer" on the subject line. Today's Wish List request is from the Ithaca Children's Garden. The Ithaca Children's Garden (ICG) is ecstatic about the award of a matching grant from the NYS Park Department that 1 of 2 11/2/13 2:28 PM EDITORIAL -The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivcr.comfithacajoumal/doe/377885941 him... will allow them to begin the first stage of garden development at Cass Park. In order to receive the grant ICG is required to generate matching funds and services. Volunteer time by youth, adults, gardeners, landscapers, and builders all count toward the match. Phase I of the Ithaca Children's Garden includes a serpentine path, a turtle mound, a compost area and two discovery gardens. The ICG also welcomes volunteers for fundraising, public events and to lead education programs like the Detective Series. If you are interested in volunteering, contact the ICG at (607) 272-2292. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) According to Scott, the new water districts on Dubois Road and on South Street are nearing completion and the town hopes to break ground on the Jacksonville project in the spring of 2003. [...] the cost and frequent opposition to new water districts has made it impractical to extend municipal systems to outlying areas. Besides Ulysses, there are spotty water problems in local towns such as Caroline, Danby, Lansing and Newfield. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:28 ['M Water issues will flow into'03 The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Mosley, Kandea Date: Jan 2, 2003 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count 964 Document Text Journal Staff ITHACA - Shoring up water supplies in Tompkins County was a central concern in 2002, as town leaders studied water sources and formed water districts. Looking ahead in 2003, town leaders say they will continue to study their water reserves with an eye on future development and raising property values. "People realize that if they want to increase there tax base, they have to encourage development in the towns," said Newfield official Mary Beth Holub. "You need municipal water and sewer both. You need those infrastructure in place." What follows is a look at some of the water issues confronting several towns in Tompkins County: Caroline: In the Town of Caroline, officials will continue to seek funding for its eight-year acquifer study of 6 Mile Creek Valley and Willseyville Creek Valley. The study, one of the town's most significant efforts to protect its water reserves, is expected to cost approximately $393,000. "We will be applying for funding from the county and the state and I will be asking Sherwood Boehlert (R -23rd Dist.) for help as well," Town Supervisor Don Barber said. Danby: Town Supervisor Ric Dietrich said Danby's situation bears some similarities to Caroline's. "For both of our towns, and for a lot of rural towns, the whole aquifer study becomes paramount in how we do housing," Dietrich said. Dietrich said town officials were just beginning to examine the town's water supply, and were unaware of the number of aquifers the town has. "We don't know the relationship between surface and subsurface water. We know there's an interaction," he said. But whether the town should have stricter septic regulations was something the town would have to look at, he said. "Our planning board has it as a fairly good priority in our comprehensive plan. And we're also meeting with the county," Dietrich said. Newfield: In 2002, Town of Newfield residents saw the beginnings of closure to decades of water mismanagement in the Shelter Valley neighborhood. Since 1975, water supplied to residents in Shelter Valley has routinely failed state and federal health standards. Ernest Bury, the system's operator during that time, repeatedly ignored health department orders to test the water for microbes and repair storage tanks. Holub said the Shelter Valley controversy stirred support for Water District 2. 'To have the town operating the system there, to have an adequate supply, was one of the major reasons for considering this project," Holub said. Once formed, Water District 2 will also include Meadowbrook Park and Jim Ray's trailer park. I of 3 11/2/13 3:28 PM Water issues will flow into'03 - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377845335.htm... Although the water project isn't scheduled for completion until the second half of 2004, the district's formation is an important step in alleviating the area's water woes. Ulysses: In the the Town of Ulysses, Water District 3 was granted the go-ahead in 2002, ending years of grassroots and town board collaboration to deliver municipal water to Jacksonville. Residents of the hamlet, located two miles south of Trumansburg along Route 96, have been campaigning for clean water after underground gas leaks polluted a handful of wells on Route 96 and Jacksonville Road in the late 1970s. Over the summer, the future of the district hinged on whether The Town of Ithaca would allow the construction of a pumping station on Woolf Lane to serve Ulysses residents. The pumping station will eventually move water from the Bolton Point water treatment plant into the Hamlet of Jacksonville. The Town of Ulysses also granted conditional approval to form Water District 4 to serve three households on Dubois Road in 2002. The Town also began studying a request submitted by residents to form Water District 5. If approved, the water district will serve homes at the Village of Trumansburg line on South Street, down Podunk Road and Waterburg Road. Village of Trumansburg Trustee John Levine said the village board will focus on improving the village's back-up water system and addressing low water pressure at the north end. "The real issues are the improved pressure, which will mean pumps or tanks, and in the long run, interconnection to Jacksonville," Levine said. Lansing: In the Town of Lansing, board members introduced a proposal to consolidate its 39 water districts at a public informational session over the summer. Town Supervisor Stephen Farkas said forming a single master district will hopefully eliminate some of the red tape involved in extending water service. "Hopefully by the summer at the latest, the board will sit down and say if its worth it going forward' Farkas said. Enfield: Jean Owens, supervisor of the Town of Enfield, said the town's water resources committee will host water workshops beginning in January. The two-part sessions are being cosponsored with the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network and are scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 14, and Saturday, Jan. 18. "We will be discussing water quality issues - generally informing the residents of the community about what Enfield water resources look like;" Owens said. Dryden: Deb Grantham, chair of the Cayuga Lake Watershed Intermunicipal Organization and a Dryden Town Board official, said the town reserved $80,000 in its 2003 budget to go towards the Virgil Creek Aquifer study. The $398,700 study, which will be partially funded through the U.S. Geological Survey, was approved by the town in July. Grantham said town officials want to determine the amount of ground water seeping into the aquifer at non -flood times, and learn how much water the aquifer is losing to the surface. Town officials hope to install a monitoring well by the end of March, she said. "We want to know the extent and the depth - the geometry of the aquifer, how much water it contains and how much water you can pull from it," Grantham said. She said they will also examine flow directions and where the aquifer is replenished to protect water from contamination. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 3 11!2113 3:28 PM Abstract (Document Summary) In 2002, Town of Newfield residents saw the beginnings of closure to decades of water mismanagement in the Shelter Valley neighborhood. Since 1975, water supplied to residents in Shelter Valley has routinely failed state and federal health standards. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 3of3 I1/2/133:28PM Jacksonville rebounding since leaks The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Wilson, Adam Date: Dec 31, 2003 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 339 Document Text Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - While the ban on MTBE could possibly effect the pocketbooks of people at the pump, it can't come soon enough for the residents of this hamlet in the Town of Ulysses. The community has been plagued since the 1970s by a series of MTBE -laden gasoline leaks from the fuel tanks of the Nice N Easy convenience store at 1854 Jacksonville Road. For more than 10 years, a half-dozen houses sat vacant, their owners forced to leave by the contaminated drinking water in the wells. In 1988 the Mobil Corporation purchased these homes, and has recently had them demolished, but residents say irs taken a long time for the hamlet to rebound. "Houses are selling again," said Richard Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association, "and at dose to the average price of houses in the surrounding area. Thars the good news." But economic recovery does not come cheaply. The series of spills led residents to invest heavily in a new municipal water system that is scheduled to be operational in January and will eventually provide service to about 300 households. While Exxon -Mobil still owns six Jacksonville properties, and is still required by law to test the land for new contamination, the corporation is under no obligation to provide financial assistance to the town for the construction of the new water district. "Exxon is not a part of this," said Coogan. "We've been given a zero percent loan from (the state) for $3.5 million" But even if all 300 households pay the estimated $1,100 to hook to the waterline, the $3.5 million price tag for the waterline itself represents an additional $12,000 that each home will have to pay over the next 30 years. "No. It's not cheap," said Coogan. "But a lot of the wells around here have problems. Not just MTBE problems, but poor flow problems. A lot of them were hand -dug, which means other types of contamination problems. And it's time, you know? Its really time to move forward." Contact: awilson@ithaca.gannett.com. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) 1 of 2 11/2/13 1:57 PM Jacksonville rebounding since leaks - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.comrithacajoumal/doc/377951767.him... While Exxon -Mobil still owns six Jacksonville properties, and is still required by law to test the land for new contamination, the corporation is under no obligation to provide financial assistance to the town for the construction of the new water district. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:57 PM Jacksonville water on ice The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Jan 22, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 559 Document Text Recent cold snap delays project By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Bills have already arrived for Jacksonville residents in Water District 3, but water from the new system will not be running for months. Construction began last year on the project, after six years of lobbying by the hamlet's community association. Clean water has been an issue here ever since a fuel leak from an Exxon Mobil station contaminated wells in the 1970s. The new district will pump in water from Bolton Point water treatment plant in the Town of Ithaca and be available to about 330 residents. The project has been slowed by problems, but the latest snag rests with residents and the weather. It's a "funny dilemma," said Richard Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association and chairman of Ulysses' planning board. The pipes must be sanitized before water can be pumped into the homes. That can't be done until weather temperatures climb above 32 -degrees Fahrenheit, said Paul Tunison, the Bolton Point plant's general manager. If not, the water would freeze during the 48 hours it takes to complete the process. When the sanitation is complete, residents have to be ready to accept the water into their homes immediately, Coogan said. "The tricky part is we don't have any users hooked up," he said. "Once you sanitize the lines, the line's got to be used. If you don't use the lines, the sanitation breaks down." At least 50 residents, spanning the length of the system, need to connect their pipes to the system before the process can be complete, Coogan said. He's not sure how many people are ready to hook up, either from indecision or lack of interest. Jim Moe, a 45 -year resident of Jacksonville Road, doesn't want the new water source. "I've got a beautiful well," he said. "I don't care about water from the lake." He doesn't have to take the water. But each resident in the district will pay $256 a year for the next three decades to repay a $2.65 million no -interest state loan used to fund project, Coogan said. A $73 operation and maintenance fee will also be charged each year. That price could vary, depending on the number of people connecting or disconnecting from the water district. ISA Babcock Breeders' departure could mean prices would go up for residents. If more homes are built in the area, the price would go down. Water District 3 was first proposed in the 1970s and again in the 1980s, but was turned down. "In the '80s what they tried to do was to get the entire town to pay for the water district," Coogan said. "Whether the 1 of 2 1112113 1:44 PM Jacksonville water on ice - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377893870.him... water was coming to you or not you had to pay. That's why it largely was defeated." Coogan's association spent years making a case for the water district, gamering grants for well testing and showing price comparisons on wells versus water district costs. The town board passed a resolution in February 2001, backed by petitions from Jacksonville area residents, to design the district. But in 2002, they encountered protests from Woolf Lane residents who didn't want the town's pumping station in their neighborhood. Residents thought the water district would bring unwanted development, threaten property values and create noise. That behind him, Coogan said he believes water should be running by April. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Recent cold snap delays project By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Bills have already arrived for Jacksonville residents in Water District 3, but water from the new system will not be running for months. The new district will pump in water from Bolton Point water treatment plant in the Town of Ithaca and be available to about 330 residents. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is pmhibked without permission. 2 of 2 11/2113 1:44 PM Hamlet ready for water flow The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Mar 22, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Wont Count: 671 Document Text Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Municipal water is only weeks away for Ulysses residents who live in the hamlet of Jacksonville and along Route 96 within Water District No. 3. The final phase of cleaning the pipes - chlorination from a storage tank on Van Doms Comers Road at Iradell - should be completed by the end of next week, said Paul Tunison, general manager of the Town of Ithaca's Bolton Point Water System. The storage tank was disinfected late last week. Pipes between Balton Point and the tank were cleaned two weeks ago as the temperature rose. Once the chlorination process is complete, homeowners who have the proper plumbing in place can switch from well water to district water. "It should only be about a 10 -minute process," Richard Coogan, president of the Jacksonville Community Association, said of switch. Construction began last year on Water District No. 3, the final stages slowed by cold weather in January. The Jacksonville Community Association had been working six years before that to see the project take shape. Water became a major issue years ago, after a gas leak from the former Exxon Mobil station at the comer of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road contaminated wells in the 1970s. The new district will pump in water from the Bolton Point water treatment plant. About 50 people have requested permits from the town of Ulysses to conned to the water district, including several in the past week. Coogan said. Pipes from the main line to houses are in the ground, but residents have to pay a plumber to conned them to the system. Wayne Bertelsen, who has lived on Route 96 since 1978, has already connected his home to the system and is ready for the day district water is available. The Bertelsens' well was not contaminated by the gas leaks. "We're keeping our well so well have two sources of water," he said. But Bertelsen was behind the push to change from well water to municipal water. "Town water is generally a boon to property values," he said. The new system should also increase water pressure for the area, Bertelsen said. His only concern is that his front yard, which was dug up for the project, will be set right before the contractor, R. Myers Construction, based in Rochester, leaves. About 330 users were initially identified for this district. But not everyone in the community is ready to make the switch. Some residents have decided to stay with their own wells. Beverly Golden and her husband, James, who have lived on Jacksonville Road for 28 years, aren't sure they'll switch to the new system. Their well was not contaminated like their neighbors across the street, who brought a lawsuit against the Mobil Corporation, Beverly Golden said. Mobil now owns five properties across the road, which once belonged to their neighbors. 1 of 2 1 ] /2/13 2:55 PM Hamlct ready for water flow - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http:Hpqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377826513.htm... Still there is a need for a new water source. The water's high sulfur content makes it smell like rotten eggs in the summer, Beverly Golden said. "I have been using bottled water for years," she added. But now that she and her husband are both in their 70s, they're not sure they want to deal with changing systems. "I'm sure any younger couple is going to be excited about being able to get good water," she said. "1 know bringing the water up through (Jacksonville) has brought a good deal of excitement." Residents and business owners within District No. 3 already have received their first bills for the project. Each resident in the district, regardless of whether they conned to the new water system, will pay $256 a year for the next three decades to repay a $2.65 million no -interest state loan used to fund the district. A $73 operation and maintenance fee will also be charged for the life of the system. The prices are subject to change as new users join the district or those in the district leave the area. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com Municipal water system for Jacksonville in final stages Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The final phase of cleaning the pipes - chlorination from a storage tank on Van Doms Comers Road at Iradell - should be completed by the end of next week, said Paul Tunison, general manager of the Town of Ithaca's Bolton Point Water System. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:55 PM Jacksonville water The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Date: Mar 31, 2004 Start Page: A.7 Section: Editorials Text Word Count: 478 Document Text Relief will finally flow Many municipal water projects are built to enable expanded residential or commercial development. In the Town of Ulysses, a new water district will free many families from being forced to drink bottled water - and will alleviate nagging worries from many other residents about decades -old underground petroleum pollution. Thanks to an ongoing effort by Ulysses town officials and the cooperation of their counterparts in the Town of Ithaca, a $3.5 million public water project is nearly complete. Lines, pumping stations and holding tanks have been tested and chlorinated. Residents may be able to use the new system as early as next week. Funded by an interest-free state loan to the Town of Ulysses, this water project taps into the Town of Ithaca's lines on West Hill and extends northward to Jacksonville and beyond. The water will come from the Bolton Point intermunicipal treatment plant on the east shore of Cayuga Lake. When the new Ulysses water district project is up and running, it is expected to provide water for up to 300 Ulysses homes and businesses. The $3.5 million cost of such a project is high for a small town such as Ulysses, even with an interest-free loan. Yet the need is clear. During the 1970s, underground gasoline tanks began leaking at a former Mobil station at 1874 Jacksonville Road. Spilled gasoline spread underground and contaminated several nearby wells. Residents in seven homes had to abandon their dwellings because of the contamination. Mobil bought those properties in 1988 and recently demolished all but one of the buildings, which was a historic church meetinghouse on Jacksonville Road. Despite environmental cleanups, pollution still lingers underground there. However, the cast iron pipes in the new water system will be impervious to any petroleum pollution. Once the system is complete, homeowners are responsible to pay for connections from the municipal water lines to their homes. The cost could range from less than $1,000 to several thousand dollars, depending on how far a dwelling is set back from the road. But such an investment ensures clean and plentiful water. "It's a miserable thing not to be able to use the water out of your tap," said Diane Hillmann, a Jacksonville resident who has had to drink bottled water for years due to contamination concerns. Hillman has already had a line installed to connect her house to the municipal system. 'This will free me from all that equipment - and all those large blue bottles in my kitchen. I'm really looking forward to it." Besides the spilled gasoline, many Jacksonville wells have problems with flow rates, salt, sulfur and other contamination problems such as nitrates and coliform pollution. Jacksonville Community Association President Richard Coogan appropriately summed up the project by acknowledging that the water system isn't cheap, but given the problems with wells, "It's really time to move forward." Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) of 2 11/2/13 1:51 PM Jacksonville water -'The Ithaca Journal: Archives hUp:llpqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doe/377968113.htm... Besides the spilled gasoline, many Jacksonville wells have problems with flow rates, salt, sulfur and other contamination problems such as nitrates and coliform pollution. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:51 PM Water begins to flow The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Apr 9, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 652 Document Text First homes hooked up to new Route 96 water district By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Looking past the peeling white paint and dirty cream siding, Charles Schlough found something "attractive" in the old-style home sitting close to the edge of Route 96 in the hamlet of Jacksonville. The house at 1845 Trumansburg Road - badly in need of repair - was one of several in the Ulysses hamlet on land affected by gas leaks that have plagued the community for more than 30 years. On Thursday, the house was connected to the long-awaited Water District #3, which now offers residents and businesses in the community municipal water from Bolton Point Water System in the Town of Ithaca. A total of six homes were connected on Thursday, Town of Ulysses Supervisor Doug Austic said. About 65 permits plumbing permits have gone out to residents who are within the water district, Ulysses Clerk Marsha Georgia added. The water district - which runs from the border of Ulysses and Ithaca - currently has 278 curb stops for homes and business to connect with. Austic said he hopes the water district will revitalize the community and attract others to refurbish rundown properties in the area. He'd also like to see land purchased by ExxonMobil along Jacksonville Road back in use. "We're pushing for it, but they aren't extremely receptive," he said. Patty Delaney, an EoconMobil Corporation spokeswoman said: "At this time, we have no plans for the property." The Mobil Oil Corporation bought sox properties in the late 1980s as part of a legal settlement after gas leaks contaminated the ground water in the 1970s. The Kraft family home at 1857 Trumansburg Road - which is across from the Exxon gas station - was one of the affected properties bought in 1989 by the company. Joseph Mikula said he first discovered a problem at his mother and stepfather's bungalow house when gas fumes overtook him in the shower. The noxious fumes made him pass out. John and Anna Kraft - now deceased - moved to Trumansburg but soon became homesick for the community they'd timed in for more than 20 years. In 1990, they bought their house and land back. The Department of Conservation installed a filtration system in the yard to clean the groundwater and a cistern was also added, Mikula said. Currently, Mikula is currently trying to sell the property for $55,000. Even with news of the water district, he said he is having a hard time. "We got no takers for a long time because of the gas spill," Mikula said. In the last three months, he received two offers from potential buyers. Both buyers dropped their bids on the house after the Health Department told them about the contamination problems. Mikula said. "The health department is aggravating because 10 years ago my mom and dad bought it back and the health department allowed them to move in," he said. "If it isn't good for other people, why did they allow my mom and dad to move back in?" Mikula is still deciding whether he will have the house connected to the water system or wait for a buyer. I of 2 1112/ 13 2:17 PM Water begins to flow - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377832166.htm... Schlough's land - two houses down from the Kraft's - wasn't affected by spills in the 1970s, but groundwater was contaminated when gas additive methyl tertiary butyl ether began leaking in 1998. The house was one of two that was given a complex filtration system in March 2000 by the Department of Environmental Conservation to clean the water, said spokeswoman Maureen Wren. That fad didn't bother Schlough when he bought the property in August 2003 and began refurbishing it. He hopes the house he bought for "a bit more" than its assessed value - $42,000 - will sell for around $120,000. "I would never have done this if public water wasn't available," the Trumansburg resident said of the project. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) First homes hooked up to new Route 96 water district By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - Looking past the peeling white paint and dirty cream siding, Charles Schlough found something "attractive" in the old-style home sitting close to the edge of Route 96 in the hamlet of Jacksonville. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:17 PM Jacksonville celebrates water win The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: May 24, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 568 Document Text Journal Staff JACKSONVILLE - The introduction of municipal water in Jacksonville was cause for a party Sunday as residents along the newly established water district celebrated the end of a 30 -year battle for water. "Should we get champagne or drink water?" was the question Nancy Leach posed to her husband, Robert, when they switched to municipal water last Thursday. The couple has spent 19 years and raised four children at 4430 Jacksonville Road, a few hundred feet from the Exxon Mobil gas station where the water problems started. A gas leak from the site -on the comer of Route 96 and Jacksonville Road - contaminated wells in the 1970s. Residents proposed Water District #3 then and again in the 1980s, but were turned down. The Jacksonville Community Association picked up the project again and worked six years before the project took shape and was finally completed in April. In the meantime, Mobil provided bottled water for residents like the Leaches whose ground was contaminated by the gasoline. Water is still provided today, Nancy Leach said. An extensive filter system was also in her basement for six years. Ground contamination was not the only problem for the family. Their well water had a high concentration of iron and sulfur. Pipes and shower heads needed replacing regularly as did the water -stained bathroom fixtures, clothes and dishes. Running water into a Gear glass appeared cloudy all the time, Leach added. With the municipal water, the family had cloudy water at first when running hot water, but it soon cleared up. Now the water is "crystal dear." "It's nice not having that smell," Leach added, referring to the sulfur. "You kind of get used to it." But visitors quickly noticed. "It's embarrassing," she said. About 80 permits have been requested for residents to switch from well water to municipal water. There are 367 users - residents and business within the district -who will pay whether they hook up to the service or not. A $2.65 million, no -interest state loan, which officials thought could be paid back during the next 30 years, will now have to be paid in 20 years. Supervisor Doug Austic said he doesn't believe it will increase the the bill - $256 this year - beyond $300 next March. Payments on the loan begin next year and will increase in size in accordance with the variable loan agreement. Austic said money collected from the first bill would be used to defray the cost of the first loan payment next year. Residents' bills cannot exceed $650 a year per user. A $73 operation and maintenance fee will also be charged for the life of the system. Both the loan payments and maintenance fees could increase or decrease depending on the number of users on the system. The cost is all worth it to Mike and Jodele Marshall. The family - who have lived at 1839 Trumansburg Road since 1974 - had been hauling water from Jodele Marshall's mother's home in Ithaca due to the water quality. The hard well water was plagued with iron algae. 1 of 2 11 /2/13 1:50 PM Jacksonville celebrates water win - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchivercom/ithacajoumal/doc/377974773.him... The first thing Mike Marshall noticed when he switched to municipal water was the increased water pressure. But the best part of having new water was just being able to "walk past the kitchen sink and get a drink of water," he said. "This is a real treat," Jodele Marshall said. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) The couple has spent 19 years and raised four children at 4430 Jacksonville Road, a few hundred feet from the Exxon Mobil gas station where the water problems started. Pipes and shower heads needed replacing regularly as did the water -stained bathroom fixtures, dothes and dishes. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:50 PM Jacksonville: The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Jul 6, 2004 Start Page: B.3 Section: Local Text Wont Count: 585 Document Text You've come a long way baby By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff It doesn't take long for cars to rush through the hamlet of Jacksonville, situated alongside Route 96 in Ulysses. But the tiny community has become a focal point of activity as municipal water was recently added, new sidewalk was poured, and plans for the future discussed. "Right now we are collecting as much information as we can," said Richard Coogan, Ulysses' deputy supervisor and president of the Jacksonville Community Associa-tion. 'The town recognizes that the hamlet of Jacksonville would be the next logical place for growth." Ulysses officials have designated the hamlet as a high-density residential and business districL With the municipal water line, they hope people will be drawn to the community and then businesses will follow. "One of the things that came up is that we just don't have the population density to support a business," Coogan said. That wasn't always the case. "In the late 1800s, it was almost a self-sufficient community," Jacksonville historian and lifelong resident Nancy Dean said. The community was settled along the Ithaca -Geneva Turnpike in 1799 and was briefly known as Van Cortlandt Village for Col. Philip Van Cortlandt who was awarded the land after the Revolutionary War, Dean said. Van Cortlandt never settled in the area. But others came and built inns and taverns as stagecoach stops along the way. In time, blacksmiths, a school, general stores, a creamery, a potash factory and an egg pickling plant found their way to the community. Dean said. "Because there wasn't the water power, Jacksonville didn't grow like Trumansburg," Dean added. Still, families continued to come to the area. Jacksonville has been home to Virginia Luce for 55 years. "We were looking for a house and we were just fortunate enough to hear about the house in Jacksonville and bought it in 1949 and were still here" she said. She and her husband, William Jr., moved from Ithaca but continued running the Luce Dairy Co. there. For that reason, she had two phones in her house. One to call Ithaca and one for calling Trumansburg. "There was one telephone system," she said of the Trumansburg Telephone Co. "To reach Ithaca or anywhere other than Ithaca it was long distance." Fellow Jacksonville resident Charles Dykes was able to influence the telephone company in Ithaca to bring a line to I of 2 11/2/13 2:05 I'M Jacksonville: - The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377915898.htm... Jacksonville. Those who needed to call Ithaca and its surrounding communities got a second phone connected to that line to avoid the long distance charges. The community also had it's own school that served first -through seventh- graders. The two -room school house stood next to the Jacksonville Community Church on Route 96. Nancy Dean was a student there in the 1950s. She said about 30 children comprised the seven grades while she was there. The children matriculated through the schools and then were either bused to the Trumansburg school district or their parents drove them to Ithaca. The school closed in 1962 because of the dwindling number of children. Jacksonville became more a bedroom community after World War II. Businesses were sold or closed and few remain today. The Ithaca -Geneva Turnpike, now Route 96, was widened in the earlier 1950s. "it was a nice quiet country road," Luce said. "The state of New York decided it needed to be wider ... which was a terrible mistake for the village. It removed a row of trees, removed the sidewalks. So then it left us a kind of gaping whole." Contact: mreaves@ithaca.ganneft.com Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) In time, blacksmiths, a school, general stores, a creamery, a potash factory and an egg pickling plant found their way to the community, Dean said. "Because there wasn't the water power, Jacksonville didn't grow like Trumansburg" Dean added. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 2:05 PM Ulysses might add water district The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author: Reaves, Michele Date: Jul 24, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 473 Document Text Expansion would conned Trumansburg, Jacksonville By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff ULYSSES - With the Jacksonville water district in place, Ulysses officials are looking to create Water District No. 5, connecting the Jacksonville district to Trumansburg's system. The connection would give Trumansburg a new backup water source. Ulysses residents along Waterburg, Podunk and Indian Fort roads, not already hooked into a system created by Trumansburg, would be allowed to hook up to municipal water. "We're still negotiating on how it would work," Trumansburg Mayor John Levine said. The current village waterline extends out to Ulysses, connecting with a well on Indian Fort Road, Levine said. The well served as the village's water source until the 1960s. The well on Indian Fort Road now serves as the village's backup water source. The water line runs out South Street to Podunk and Waterburg roads. From Waterburg, it connects to Indian Fort Road and runs out along Route 227 to the Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services residential building. About 60 homes in Ulysses are connected to the Trumansburg system, paying an out -of -district fee for service, Supervisor Doug Austic said. Ulysses residents have to prove hardship in order to conned to Trumansburg's water system. "When a bunch of people asked to hook up last year, the town agreed to form a water district," Levine said. Problems with the water table caused wells to fail, Levine said. Construction to conned Water District No. 3 with Water District No. 5 should take place next year, Austic said. A mile -long line is needed to conned Water District No. 3, which ends at Cold Springs and Durling roads, to Water District No. 5. The connection will cost about $300,000; a large percentage of that will be paid for by the village, Austic said. Problems with the getting chlorine distributed in the line may make it necessary for the project to happen sooner, though. There are few people on the higher end of the line, which reaches up to Cold Springs and Durling roads, connected to the Jacksonville system, Austic said. If the 60 homes in Water District No. 5 were connected, then water would run evenly throughout the entire system. Austic said more homes are connecting to the line so this may not be a problem in the near future. He added that the lost to residents should be cheaper when the town's water district is finally created. The district should be in place by this fall after village and town board members come to a legal agreement. I of 2 11 /2/13 2:14 PM Ulysses might add water district -'The Ithaca Journal: Archives http://pgasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/.1779875g7.htm... Ulysses residents who receive Trumansburg water pay between $60 and $75 a quarter for water, Levine said. Once the water tower project is complete. Trumansburg residents rates will "go up substantially" to pay off the $1 million loan. The rate increase will not go into affect until the 2005 budget period. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Expansion would connect Trumansburg, Jacksonville By MICHELE REAVES Journal Staff ULYSSES - With the Jacksonville water district in place, Ulysses officials are looking to create Water District No. 5, connecting the Jacksonville district to Trumansburg's system. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2of2 11/2/132:14 PM New users hooking up to Jacksonville water The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Author. Reaves, Michele Date: Oct 20, 2004 Start Page: B.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 569 Document Text Journal Staff ULYSSES - Six months have passed since water began flowing in Ulysses' Water District No. 3 and work in the area has not slowed. 'We're still hooking up people out there," said Supervisor Doug Austic. Since the districts completion, 107 residents and business owners have connected their property to the water line, according to town clerk Marsha Georgia. Plumbing permits are also being sold regularly, though many have bought them and then not switched from their well to the municipal water system. Water is supplied currently from the Six Mile Creek Reservoir, the City of Ithaca's water source, Paul Tunison, general manager of the Bolton Point Water System. The Town of Ithaca contracted the city to supply a portion of its water until a new line was connected to the Bolton point plant. The connection should be complete in December. There were 367 users identified for the water district. Residents have said cost and satisfaction with their well has kept some on their own water source. Part of the continued work on the system involves problems sending chlorine along the length of the line the runs along Route 96 in the Town of Ithaca and Ulysses, as well as adjacent streets to Jacksonville. Water - supplied by the City of Ithaca and bought through the Town of Ithaca - had been pumped daily to the district's water tank on Van Doms Comers Road. The heavily chlorinated water wasn't reaching the tank or moving well along the water lines, Austic said. Austic said the problem was not critical because the water still passed bacteria tests. But the chlorine level did not meet Tompkins County Health Department standards. To fix the problem, engineers increased the amount of water being pumped up the system and towered the amount of water retained in the tank, he said. "If we had more people, we'd be better off too," Austic added of residents drawing water higher up on the system Whether residents and businesses within the system use the water or not, they could see their bill increase. Austic estimated the cost at $300 next year, as the first bill is due on a $2.65 million no -interest state loan used to fund the project. The bill was $256 earlier this year. But the loan now must be repaid in the next 20 years instead of 30 years as town officials originally planned. A $73 operation and maintenance fee will also be charged for the life of the system. Austic said he plans to use part of the water fund's balance to lower the cost. An exact amount will be determined later within the budget process. A budget workshop meeting is scheduled at 7 p.m. Oct. 25. 1 of 2 11/2/13 1:53 PM New users hooking up to Jacksonville water - The Ithaca Journa... http://pgasb.pgarchiver comrithacajoumal/doc/377940413.him... Austic also told board members he'd like the town to purchase a truck, which would be shared between the water district manager and the zoning officer. Austic currently serves as the town's water district manager. He said paying $0.37 per mile for town employees to drive around town cost about $900 last month and between $1,200 and $1,500 in previous months. "That's a lot of gas," Austic said on Monday of the money spent. "You could buy your own truck." In the town's tentative budget, $20,000 was budgeted in the zoning and building equipment lines for the vehicle. Austic said buying the truck through state bidding may lower the cost to about $15,000. Contact: mreaves@ithaca.gannett.com Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Since the district's completion, 107 residents and business owners have connected their property to the water line, according to town clerk Marsha Georgia. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 1:53 PM Ulysses, T -burg seek solution for proposed water district The Ithaca Journal - Ithaca, N.Y. Date: Aug 12, 2006 Start Page: 6.1 Section: Local Text Word Count: 626 Document Text Journal Staff An informal joint committee composed of Ulysses and Trumansburg officials met for the first time this week to grapple through the complexities of a proposed water district and to try and meet each other half way on several disagreements. The proposed Water District Number 5 would cost the town about $4.8 million and would provide water service to Ulysses residents who are currently not being served by any municipality. The proposed water district is 14 miles of pipe that loops in and out around Trumansburg and stretches from Jacksonville to Taughannock State Park. Water districts provide water service within one or more municipalities. The cost of the water service is paid by a tax or fee levied within the district. Ulysses Supervisor, Douglas Austic, estimates that about 30 percent of the town's residents are in need of the municipal water service. In the 2000 census the town's population was 4,476 with 1,490 owner -occupied residences and 506 renter -occupied households. Controversy arose this summer when Austic applied for the state funds for the district without a vote from the town board. The move upset officials and residents. "He gives no explanation," said Ulysses board member Lucia Tyler. "He just says that he thinks it was the best for the town, and he is not apologetic about this at all. It's turned out to be somewhat divisive." The state approved Austic's plan, giving the town a 30 -year no interest loan to complete the district. Officials with the village, which already has a water system, said that the proposed district will absorb a fourth of their water customers and raise rates for their remaining users. The newly formed joint committee was created to help mend fences and improve talks between the town and village about the water project. "It's a horrible deal for everybody else in the village," said Trumansburg Mayor, John Levine. Levine estimates that rates for the remaining village residents will increase by 40 percent, a figure Austic disputes. "Most of the cost of the water system are fixed like service and staff," Levine said. "Basically we will have three-quarters of the people paying 100 percent of the cost." Levine admits that a new water district will provide some town residents with much needed water and would potentially make the town more attractive to developers. "This is why it's not so simple to work out," said Tyler, who is a member of the joint committee. "Because it does solve some problems with bad water in the town." Tyler and Levine said Austic's plan still leaves some town residents without municipal water. Residents on Dubois Road toward Ithaca would not be served by the proposed water district. The informal joint committee met Monday to discuss options for making Water District Number 5 less painful for the village and still beneficial to town residents who need the water. Levine said solutions could be as simple as making adjustments to the current plan or as aggressive as putting in a 1 of 2 1112/13 3:31 PM Ulysses,T-burg seek solution for proposed water district - The 1... completely new application with the state next year. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377896113.htm... Austic said the current deal is the best the town will get and that the town and village are better served by pushing forward with his plan. "The village's water cost was going to increase anyway because their current water system is old and will require updating," he said. "With my plan they get a second source of water from a completely new system." Levine expects the committee to meet for several months. Their next meeting is Aug. 23. "Given the amount of money at stake and given the effect on the village's water users, in good conscience I can't go ahead until I'm really sure that whatever we're doing is the best thing for the village residents," he said. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. Abstract (Document Summary) Because it does solve some problems with bad water in the town. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11/2/13 3:31 PM Ulysses water district bill surprises town board - The Ithaca Jou... hup.//pgasb.pgarchiver.com/ithacajoumal/doc/377954778.htm... Abstract (Document Summary) Both the loan payments and maintenance fees could increase or decrease depending on the number of users on the system. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction ar distribution is prohibited without permission. 2 of 2 11 /2/13 2:56 PM